The best and the worst book you've read?

Share and discuss.

The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby brevel_monkey » Fri Oct 01, 2010 4:48 am

What's the best book you've read? What's one to avoid? Why?

Sell it to us! (Or stop is from buying it!)

Best:
When Broken Glass Floats - Charithy Him (http://www.betterworldbooks.com/when-br ... 22106.aspx)
I went through a period of reading stories from the Khmer Rouge era, this was by far the best from the grizzly era. Going beyond being horrific personal story, it gives a brilliant amount of detail about khmer culture and tradition and tells the tale of how an entire culture was dessicated.

One to avoid:
The Constant Gardener - John Le Carre (http://www.betterworldbooks.com/the-con ... 03900.aspx)
I haven't seen the film yet. But the book started off with 200 pages of desperate housewives then devolved in to a poorly written thriller based in Western Europe. Given the subject matter, a huge dissapointment for me.

other good books:

Pearl S Buck - the Good Earth (http://www.betterworldbooks.com/the-goo ... 00189.aspx)

Morally ambiguous in several ways, it tells the story of a chinese peasant in the pre-communist era. The best 'rags to riches' story I've ever read.

Ma Jian - Red Dust ( http://www.betterworldbooks.com/red-dus ... 20238.aspx )

A very interesting account of a writer's travels around China in the Deng Xiaoping era - and a very rare insight in to the country at that time.
Life is infinitely stranger than anything which the mind of man could invent. We would not dare to conceive the things which are really mere commonplaces of existence. If we could fly out of that window hand in hand, hover over this great city, gently remove the roofs, and peep in at the queer things which are going on, the strange coincidences, the plannings, the cross-purposes, the wonderful chains of events, working through generations, and leading to the most outre results, it would make all fiction with its conventionalities and foreseen conclusions most stale and unprofitable.
- Sherlock Holmes, A Case of Identity
User avatar
brevel_monkey
'
 
Posts: 1443
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 3:01 pm
Location: London, UK

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby jonquil » Fri Oct 01, 2010 8:54 pm

Just to let you know, I have been racking my brain trying to think of the worst book I ever read and I just can't pin it down yet. That might be because I'm careful to find out about a book before I read it, but I think there had to have been some hated books that teachers forced me to read.

I have some bests though. Dostoyevsky's The Idiot, The Brothers Karamazov; Thomas Mann's Doktor Faustus; John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath, The Log from the Sea of Cortez; Lampedusa's The Leopard (book and film); Lem's Solaris (book and Tarkovsky's film); Graham Greene's Monsignor Quixote; Arthur Koestler's Darkness at Noon; Hermann Hesse's Narcissus and Goldmund, Steppenwolf, The Glass Bead Game; stories by Jorge Luis Borges; the complete O. Henry: Mark Twain's Huck Finn, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court: Dietrich Knickerbocker's History of New York; Madeleine L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time; Charles Dickens' Our Mutual Friend -- to name a few.
"Sur le volcan ne pousse pas l'herbe" (Grass does not grow on a volcano). - Ivor Cutler on his bald pate
User avatar
jonquil
Philosopher
 
Posts: 3546
Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2010 12:57 am
Location: Greenest city in the world!

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby PavlovianModel146 » Sat Oct 02, 2010 2:17 am

The best book I have ever read is either, Don Quixote, by Cervantes or Candide by Voltaire. You've probably read both of those by now, but I would say that if it weren't for those books, satire would be almost non-existent. Additionally, even though those novels make reference to things that happened in history, many of the observations can still be seen as holding true and applicable to this day. That fact is quite fascinating because it means that the observations that the authors thought they were making related to specific historical events actually apply to humanity as a whole.

...Or, maybe that was intended.


As far as a worst book is concerned, that's kind of tough because I have a tendency to avoid finishing books that suck. I'm probably going to have to turn to books that we read in High School for this one, so I'll say Romeo & Juliet. Unfortunately, the plot of that book is a rancid piece of shit and if Romeo were to exist in the present day, he'd probably be one of those whiny little emo bitch-boys that are constantly getting their asses handed to them. Actually, now that I think about it, their asses aren't even worth kicking because you'd probably just end up getting sticky from and staining your clothes with their cheap hair product. Best to just stay away from them.

That's Romeo.

Mercuito was the only compelling character in the whole goddamn thing, so of course, he had to get killed.

The biggest problem is that they killed themselves over one another. The thing that one must understand about most (MOST) High School children is the fact that they are emotionally and socially retarded, in varying ways and to varying degrees. So, the idea that one should (or even could) get so emotionally hung up over the death of another person that they have physically seen for a cumulative thirty-eight seconds that they kill themselves shouldn't be taught.

In fact, anything involving suicide or people who happen to be emotional outliers shouldn't be taught in High School because knowing about that kind of bullshit is what spawns trends like, "Goth," "Emo," "Vampire," and God knows what else. The fashion and customs of these kids becomes so much more ridiculous year after year that the cutting off of one's own penis and use of it as a necklace is probably going to be a fad before long.

On the other hand, some of the kids that get their ideas from this sort of drivel do commit suicide, so I suppose that at least infinitesimally counters over-population and reduces the pool of people competing for a scarce amount of resources. They don't even compete anyway because their parents give them everything, and in exchange for what, so that their parents (who they hate) have to be embarassed to be seen in public with them?

The fuck kind of trade-off is that? Here is food, clothing, shelter and emotional nurture and in exchange all I need you to do is bad mouth capitalist consumerism and talk about how the whole world is meaningless and how you'd prefer to be dead in front of my boss. While you're at it, can you briefly discuss those points with my golf buddies if you happen to see them? Actually, it would be better if you tell the NORMAL children of my golf buddies all about it, so they can tell their parents, so that I can have my fucking parenting questioned when I'm trying to putt!!!

I think I may have gone a little off-track here.

The point is, Romeo & Juliet sucks and encourages one to be a whiny little bitch.
"Love is the gravity of the Soul" - Abstract -/-/1988 - 3/11/2013 R.I.P

Image
User avatar
PavlovianModel146
Ringing The Bell
 
Posts: 7137
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2007 4:56 am
Location: Ohio

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby jonquil » Sat Oct 02, 2010 2:14 pm

Churro the Viscous wrote:Best book: The Gospel According to Jesus Christ by Jose Saramago
Worst book: Dante's Inferno by Dante

Just was on a 9-hour greyhound bus ride.
Read Fahrenheit 451 on the bus.
Great premise.
Horrible writing.


Odd. F451 read well for me, I'm not sure why. I've always tended to like Bradbury. As for Dante, I always did better reading about the Inferno, same as with Kant. I never read Saramago but the info on wiki makes him sound interesting.
"Sur le volcan ne pousse pas l'herbe" (Grass does not grow on a volcano). - Ivor Cutler on his bald pate
User avatar
jonquil
Philosopher
 
Posts: 3546
Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2010 12:57 am
Location: Greenest city in the world!

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby jonquil » Sat Oct 02, 2010 8:17 pm

Churro the Viscous wrote:saramago was my favorite living author...until he died this year.

anyway, 451 just went by too fast for me.
it was told so quickly, as if the writer were in a hurry to get the story out.
(which, not surprisingly, he was: he wrote it on pay-by-the-half-hour typewriters)


Did you read Saramago in Portuguese or in translation? I keep wondering if you are Portuguese yourself.
"Sur le volcan ne pousse pas l'herbe" (Grass does not grow on a volcano). - Ivor Cutler on his bald pate
User avatar
jonquil
Philosopher
 
Posts: 3546
Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2010 12:57 am
Location: Greenest city in the world!

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby PavlovianModel146 » Sat Oct 02, 2010 10:58 pm

Churro the Viscous wrote:saramago was my favorite living author...until he died this year.

anyway, 451 just went by too fast for me.
it was told so quickly, as if the writer were in a hurry to get the story out.
(which, not surprisingly, he was: he wrote it on pay-by-the-half-hour typewriters)


Not only that, but with the exception of F451, Bradbury was better known for his short stories. "There Will Come Soft Rains," is probably my favorite short story of his, should either of you (Inclusive to yourself and Jonquil) ever get the chance to read it.

Here's a link to it, only four pages long:

http://jerrywbrown.com/datafile/datafil ... adbury.pdf
"Love is the gravity of the Soul" - Abstract -/-/1988 - 3/11/2013 R.I.P

Image
User avatar
PavlovianModel146
Ringing The Bell
 
Posts: 7137
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2007 4:56 am
Location: Ohio

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby jonquil » Sun Oct 03, 2010 6:14 pm

PavlovianModel146 wrote:
Churro the Viscous wrote:saramago was my favorite living author...until he died this year.

anyway, 451 just went by too fast for me.
it was told so quickly, as if the writer were in a hurry to get the story out.
(which, not surprisingly, he was: he wrote it on pay-by-the-half-hour typewriters)


Not only that, but with the exception of F451, Bradbury was better known for his short stories. "There Will Come Soft Rains," is probably my favorite short story of his, should either of you (Inclusive to yourself and Jonquil) ever get the chance to read it.

Here's a link to it, only four pages long:

http://jerrywbrown.com/datafile/datafil ... adbury.pdf


Great story. It appears that Bradbury is a great one for showing metaphorically what the apocalyptic future of mechanism looks like when the machine is emptied of humans. His story "The Pedestrian" is very cautionary in this regard as well. [See: http://englischlehrer.de/texts/pedestrian.php] The horror is in the emptiness of the metal shells that represent what humans become without hearts and souls. To quote PK Dick: "the real horror ... is not that the police car has its own tropism as it hounds the protagonist but that, within the car, there is a vacuum. A place unfilled. The absence of something vital -- that is the horrific part, the apocalyptic vision of a future nightmare. But I, myself, foresee something more optimistic: Had I written that story I would have had a teenager behind the wheel of the police car -- he has stolen it while the policeman is in a coffee shop on his lunch break, and the kid is going to resell it by tearing it down into parts. This may sound a little cynical on my part, but wouldn't this be preferable? As we say in California, where I live, when the police come to investigate a burglary of your house, they find, when they are leaving, that someone has stripped the tires and motor and transmission from their car, and the officers must hitchhike back to headquarters. This thought may strike fear in the hearts of the establishment people, but frankly it makes me cheerful. Even the most base schemes of human beings are preferable to the most exalted tropisms of machines. I think this, right here, is one of the valid insights possessed by some of the new youth: Cars, even police cars, are expendable; can be replaced. They are really all alike. It is the person inside who, when gone, cannot be duplicated at any price. Even if we do not like him we cannot do without him. And once gone, he will never come back." (emphasis mine)
"Sur le volcan ne pousse pas l'herbe" (Grass does not grow on a volcano). - Ivor Cutler on his bald pate
User avatar
jonquil
Philosopher
 
Posts: 3546
Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2010 12:57 am
Location: Greenest city in the world!

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby Only_Humean » Wed Oct 20, 2010 10:34 am

brevel_monkey wrote:What's the best book you've read? What's one to avoid? Why?


Tough call on the best. Probably "V" by Thomas Pynchon, one of those big books that sprawls and ties stories together so loosely and cleverly that you barely notice the joins. I've just finished reading 2666 by Bolano, it's similar and I enjoyed it, I think. Also, The Discovery of Heaven by Harry Mulisch, very similar (and ignore the film they made of it, it's horrible. Even with Stephen Fry as one of the leads).

Worst - The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists. A "classic" of left-wing literature, apparently, with rave reviews on the cover, it's execrable, plodding Marxism-for-dummies with stilted dialogue and clumsy internal monologues. Obviously written by someone who cares, but... ugh.

Bradbury's written some fantastic short stories. I love The Wonderful Ice-Cream Suit.
Image

The biology of purpose keeps my nose above the surface.
- Brian Eno
User avatar
Only_Humean
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 6198
Joined: Mon Jun 22, 2009 10:53 am
Location: Right here

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby oldschoolhero » Thu Oct 21, 2010 3:02 am

favorite book: mother night - kurt vonnegut.
worst book ever: any other book by kurt vonnegut. just kidding, the worst book ever is actually who moved my cheese...
tolerance is the graveryard of defects.
User avatar
oldschoolhero
 
Posts: 165
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 1:54 am
Location: I'm hungry. Can I have some shoes?

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby Khrone » Sun Oct 31, 2010 3:18 am

best: Rant, An Oral Biography Of Buster Casey-Chuck Palahniuk
worst: Either Pride and Prejudice-Jane Austen or The Scarlett Letter-Nathanial Hawthorne
Sincerly
-Khrone
User avatar
Khrone
 
Posts: 324
Joined: Mon Jul 27, 2009 9:34 pm

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby PavlovianModel146 » Sun Oct 31, 2010 3:58 am

The Scarlet Letter could have been okay, but some parts were too over the top.
"Love is the gravity of the Soul" - Abstract -/-/1988 - 3/11/2013 R.I.P

Image
User avatar
PavlovianModel146
Ringing The Bell
 
Posts: 7137
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2007 4:56 am
Location: Ohio

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby jonquil » Sun Oct 31, 2010 5:04 am

PavlovianModel146 wrote:The Scarlet Letter could have been okay, but some parts were too over the top.


If you approach The Scarlet Letter through the character of Chillingworth, it becomes much more interesting, fascinating in fact.
"Sur le volcan ne pousse pas l'herbe" (Grass does not grow on a volcano). - Ivor Cutler on his bald pate
User avatar
jonquil
Philosopher
 
Posts: 3546
Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2010 12:57 am
Location: Greenest city in the world!

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby Khrone » Wed Nov 03, 2010 1:46 am

jonquil wrote:If you approach The Scarlet Letter through the character of Chillingworth, it becomes much more interesting, fascinating in fact.

If it had been from his viewpoint it would certainly have been better
Sincerly
-Khrone
User avatar
Khrone
 
Posts: 324
Joined: Mon Jul 27, 2009 9:34 pm

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby nano-bug » Wed Nov 03, 2010 11:24 am

I'm going to recommend the best two modern ones:

American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis

Fight Club By Chuck Palahniuk

Both are fun and smart.

The worst book I forced on myself. Tom Clancy let his name be put on books that were entirely written by no talent people.

I can't even describe how corny the story was. I just remember the author would often finish the sentence with "Like that." Never once did "LIke That" mean anything. I would stare at it and say "Like that, what?"

(A great book is one that you re-read because the themes forever affect your life. Passages play out in your mind, like a song gets stuck.)
Highly adaptable. Yes. Wait! What? Yes. He, herself, is a head fuck. Well, will you look at this little train of thought?
User avatar
nano-bug
Philosopher
 
Posts: 3174
Joined: Fri Jul 21, 2006 5:35 pm
Location: The Virtuplex

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby Khrone » Wed Nov 03, 2010 10:08 pm

Forgot to mention, Animal Farm by Orwell is in my top 3 as well
Sincerly
-Khrone
User avatar
Khrone
 
Posts: 324
Joined: Mon Jul 27, 2009 9:34 pm

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby nano-bug » Thu Nov 04, 2010 10:59 am

If anyone read the catcher in the rye, have you also read Franny and Zoey?

Have you read 1984? What is the last line about Big Brother?

Has anyone read A Clockwork Orange but not seen the movie?

Does anyone know what current target market drives the book industry today? Sex, Age?

Do you think vampires should be written about more?

Can a book that's only sold 2000 books nationwide still be considered a bestseller?
Highly adaptable. Yes. Wait! What? Yes. He, herself, is a head fuck. Well, will you look at this little train of thought?
User avatar
nano-bug
Philosopher
 
Posts: 3174
Joined: Fri Jul 21, 2006 5:35 pm
Location: The Virtuplex

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby jonquil » Thu Nov 04, 2010 2:59 pm

Ah, questions.

nano-bug wrote:If anyone read the catcher in the rye, have you also read Franny and Zoey?


Yes, good stuff.

Have you read 1984? What is the last line about Big Brother?


Yes. Do you love BB too?

Has anyone read A Clockwork Orange but not seen the movie?


No. Care to comment?

Does anyone know what current target market drives the book industry today? Sex, Age?


I call it celebrity-itis, all media creations to drive ratings and sales. There is no book too dumb for the American people since certain elites and special interest groups drive sales by buying books in bulk and also own the media where "reviews" are written. The government and the CIA also exert pressure on what gets published.

Do you think vampires should be written about more?


LOL.

Can a book that's only sold 2000 books nationwide still be considered a bestseller?


Read what I wrote about the way book sales and advertising are manipulated.
"Sur le volcan ne pousse pas l'herbe" (Grass does not grow on a volcano). - Ivor Cutler on his bald pate
User avatar
jonquil
Philosopher
 
Posts: 3546
Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2010 12:57 am
Location: Greenest city in the world!

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby nano-bug » Sat Nov 06, 2010 6:17 am

jonquil wrote:Ah, questions.

nano-bug wrote:If anyone read the catcher in the rye, have you also read Franny and Zoey?


Yes, good stuff.

Yup, good pure stuff
Have you read 1984? What is the last line about Big Brother?


Yes. Do you love BB too?

Of course I do love BB.

Has anyone read A Clockwork Orange but not seen the movie?


No. Care to comment?

Doctor gave Burgess a short time to live. Burgess had regrets about never writing a book. So he wrote one real fast. His health conditions impoved and he didn't die. Going on to write more books.

A Clockwork orange is an experiment with language. Not many would risk this, unless they had nothing to lose, like facing death.

At first the words are weird. By the end, you are tempted to use those words in everyday conversation. The thought of those almost leaving your tongue . . .


Does anyone know what current target market drives the book industry today? Sex, Age?


I call it celebrity-itis, all media creations to drive ratings and sales. There is no book too dumb for the American people since certain elites and special interest groups drive sales by buying books in bulk and also own the media where "reviews" are written. The government and the CIA also exert pressure on what gets published.

Middle aged women.

Do you think vampires should be written about more?


LOL.

Haha, too.

Can a book that's only sold 2000 books nationwide still be considered a bestseller?


Read what I wrote about the way book sales and advertising are manipulated.


A best selling author might buy his own book to get it on the list for the sake of possible word of mouth momentum.

Book sales are not annouced like movie revenue. To get a look at those figures you would have to pay for a $60,000 service.

A book that wins an big award sometimes stuggles to sell 500 copies. A book that sells 2000 would be considered a best seller when compared to that.

Point me to what you wrote, please.
Highly adaptable. Yes. Wait! What? Yes. He, herself, is a head fuck. Well, will you look at this little train of thought?
User avatar
nano-bug
Philosopher
 
Posts: 3174
Joined: Fri Jul 21, 2006 5:35 pm
Location: The Virtuplex

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby fuse » Sat Nov 06, 2010 7:20 am

I've re-read Herman Hesse's Demian a few times. That one's always stuck with me. The first book that really hit me hard was Camus's The Stranger. Read it when I was 14/15. I think I was mildly depressed when I read it -- or after I read it -- can't remember. Brave New World, which I much preferred over 1984, has also got to be at the top of my list. East of Eden by Steinbeck was good. Recently read Ender's Game for the first time and I think it would have been among my favorites if I had read it when I was younger. It's like a better, science-fiction Harry Potter.


I don't actually read much, though. And when I do, I'm pretty rigorous in choosing the next book. So much like jonquil it's difficult for me to pick out which books were worst, because I can't think of a book I've read that wasn't worth it.
User avatar
fuse
Philosopher
 
Posts: 4650
Joined: Thu Jul 20, 2006 5:13 pm

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby jonquil » Sat Nov 06, 2010 3:23 pm

fuse wrote:I've re-read Herman Hesse's Demian a few times. That one's always stuck with me. The first book that really hit me hard was Camus's The Stranger. Read it when I was 14/15. I think I was mildly depressed when I read it -- or after I read it -- can't remember. Brave New World, which I much preferred over 1984, has also got to be at the top of my list. East of Eden by Steinbeck was good. Recently read Ender's Game for the first time and I think it would have been among my favorites if I had read it when I was younger. It's like a better, science-fiction Harry Potter.


I don't actually read much, though. And when I do, I'm pretty rigorous in choosing the next book. So much like jonquil it's difficult for me to pick out which books were worst, because I can't think of a book I've read that wasn't worth it.


jonquil likes your list. The only ones I haven't read are Brave New World and Harry Potter. If you've read Demian, then you should also read Narcissus and Goldmund and The Glass Bead Game. Hesse just gets better and better with every book.
"Sur le volcan ne pousse pas l'herbe" (Grass does not grow on a volcano). - Ivor Cutler on his bald pate
User avatar
jonquil
Philosopher
 
Posts: 3546
Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2010 12:57 am
Location: Greenest city in the world!

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby fuse » Sun Nov 07, 2010 3:05 am

jonquil wrote:
fuse wrote:I've re-read Herman Hesse's Demian a few times. That one's always stuck with me. The first book that really hit me hard was Camus's The Stranger. Read it when I was 14/15. I think I was mildly depressed when I read it -- or after I read it -- can't remember. Brave New World, which I much preferred over 1984, has also got to be at the top of my list. East of Eden by Steinbeck was good. Recently read Ender's Game for the first time and I think it would have been among my favorites if I had read it when I was younger. It's like a better, science-fiction Harry Potter.


I don't actually read much, though. And when I do, I'm pretty rigorous in choosing the next book. So much like jonquil it's difficult for me to pick out which books were worst, because I can't think of a book I've read that wasn't worth it.


jonquil likes your list. The only ones I haven't read are Brave New World and Harry Potter. If you've read Demian, then you should also read Narcissus and Goldmund and The Glass Bead Game. Hesse just gets better and better with every book.

Yes, I'm reading a book called Ringworld right now (I've been on a science fiction kick and I learned about Ringworld b/c it was part of the inspiration behind the Halo video game series). Next on my list is Steppenwolf. You can bet I'll get to Narcissus and Goldmund and The Glass Bead Game eventually. Also, I noticed The Brothers Karamazov and The Grapes of Wrath on your list and it reminds me that I've been meaning to read them both for a while now.
User avatar
fuse
Philosopher
 
Posts: 4650
Joined: Thu Jul 20, 2006 5:13 pm

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby jonquil » Sun Nov 07, 2010 3:16 am

fuse wrote:
jonquil wrote:
fuse wrote:I've re-read Herman Hesse's Demian a few times. That one's always stuck with me. The first book that really hit me hard was Camus's The Stranger. Read it when I was 14/15. I think I was mildly depressed when I read it -- or after I read it -- can't remember. Brave New World, which I much preferred over 1984, has also got to be at the top of my list. East of Eden by Steinbeck was good. Recently read Ender's Game for the first time and I think it would have been among my favorites if I had read it when I was younger. It's like a better, science-fiction Harry Potter.


I don't actually read much, though. And when I do, I'm pretty rigorous in choosing the next book. So much like jonquil it's difficult for me to pick out which books were worst, because I can't think of a book I've read that wasn't worth it.


jonquil likes your list. The only ones I haven't read are Brave New World and Harry Potter. If you've read Demian, then you should also read Narcissus and Goldmund and The Glass Bead Game. Hesse just gets better and better with every book.

Yes, I'm reading a book called Ringworld right now (I've been on a science fiction kick and I learned about Ringworld b/c it was part of the inspiration behind the Halo video game series). Next on my list is Steppenwolf. You can bet I'll get to Narcissus and Goldmund and The Glass Bead Game eventually. Also, I noticed The Brothers Karamazov and The Grapes of Wrath on your list and it reminds me that I've been meaning to read them both for a while now.


Whenever you get around to reading any of those books, I would love to discuss them if you wish. That is some great literature. The Grapes of Wrath is my favorite book OF ALL TIME, and all the others are close to that. Happy reading!
"Sur le volcan ne pousse pas l'herbe" (Grass does not grow on a volcano). - Ivor Cutler on his bald pate
User avatar
jonquil
Philosopher
 
Posts: 3546
Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2010 12:57 am
Location: Greenest city in the world!

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby Bluff » Thu Jan 06, 2011 12:44 am

For the moment I'll say The Odyssey has been my best read so far, for no other reason other than I just remember thoroughly enjoying it all the way through

Like others, the actual bad books I've read were either not finished or have been banished from memory but I'll say The Da Vinci Code and Angels and Demons mainly because they just left a bad taste in my mouth, like eating junk food, kinda tasty but bad.

Fuse mentioned Demian, I've got to say the work I've read so far of Hesse just simply irritates me, he's just too...pansey-ish.

But my reading habits are terribly unimaginative, I tend to just to scour the "classics" section and pick an oldie but today I bought two fairly contemporary works by a guy called Houellebecq - Atomised and Platform, enjoying Atomised so far but I've also seen the film. Good shit.

8)
User avatar
Bluff
 
Posts: 289
Joined: Tue Aug 17, 2010 5:40 pm

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby nano-bug » Thu Jan 06, 2011 1:28 am

Bluff wrote:For the moment I'll say The Odyssey has been my best read so far, for no other reason other than I just remember thoroughly enjoying it all the way through

Like others, the actual bad books I've read were either not finished or have been banished from memory but I'll say The Da Vinci Code and Angels and Demons mainly because they just left a bad taste in my mouth, like eating junk food, kinda tasty but bad.

Fuse mentioned Demian, I've got to say the work I've read so far of Hesse just simply irritates me, he's just too...pansey-ish.

But my reading habits are terribly unimaginative, I tend to just to scour the "classics" section and pick an oldie but today I bought two fairly contemporary works by a guy called Houellebecq - Atomised and Platform, enjoying Atomised so far but I've also seen the film. Good shit.

8)


Houellebecq: I read his Elementary Particles. What I thought was an above average book turned out to be a book I frequently think about.
Highly adaptable. Yes. Wait! What? Yes. He, herself, is a head fuck. Well, will you look at this little train of thought?
User avatar
nano-bug
Philosopher
 
Posts: 3174
Joined: Fri Jul 21, 2006 5:35 pm
Location: The Virtuplex

Re: The best and the worst book you've read?

Postby Bluff » Tue Jan 11, 2011 2:38 am

nano-bug wrote:Houellebecq: I read his Elementary Particles. What I thought was an above average book turned out to be a book I frequently think about.


Just found out this is the same book as the one I've just read: Atomised. I enjoyed, it's been a while since I blasted through a book so quick, I'll think I'll mull it over for a couple of days, I think I'll re-read Brave New World too because I felt this was somewhat aimed at being a prequel to it...
User avatar
Bluff
 
Posts: 289
Joined: Tue Aug 17, 2010 5:40 pm

Next

Return to Art, Music, and Entertainment



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users