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The Printing Press

PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2020 11:42 pm
by Fixed Cross
I was discussing to promethean about the deep state, and how its inception is attributable to the printing press, which prompted the English ruling class to pre-emptively construct a state-critical apparatus so as to produce before the public could get organized around its own ideas, a manufacture of consent, as Chomsky put it.

I went to look closer at the period of the printing press, which wiki gives as 1440.
Unwittingly at first I went to google 15th century philosophers. Google didn't seem aware that this means from the 1400s not the 1500s, so I went to 13th century philosophers and saw a list of ecclesiastical honorables, in short, Aristoteleans. Id been there before, during my study of philosophers in alphabetical order last year, which was what prompted me to buy the works of Francis Bacon (I had not arrived at the B yet, so, no) - I had noticed that the philosophers were all most all both Aristotelean and Christian; Aristotle had completely usurped this millennium with thousands of wise men whom we all now consider to be less even than trite. All that had existed for many centuries was the process of copying Aristotelean volumes into new, slightly enhanced Aristotelean volumes, all of which say very little to inspire a thought process in the world. But then comes the printing press!

Suddenly, documents must be produced to be sold.
And fast!

It is not out of the ballpark to assume that the revival of philosophy is to be attributed to the technological advance of mass-publication, I am sure many have come to this conclusion before; the birth of bread writing freed us from Aristotle.
Not long after 1440, Machiavelli was born and the rest is history. Francis Bacon took the hint and understood that thought doesn't need to be aimed at refining the consequences of pre-established categories, substances, qualities and attributes, but can also be aimed at the future, as conquest. Thought as a form of conquest, inductive methods, the production of the scientific method, the unification of thought and power, and the disclosing of the concept of a makable future.

Nietzsche once quipped that the printing press has been the greatest disaster to ever befall mankind, and nowadays its hard not to agree to some point. But if it weren't for this hype-producing magical object, humanity might simply have been too lazy to emerge from the dark ages.

Re: The Printing Press

PostPosted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 12:11 am
by Meno_
Fixed Cross wrote:I was discussing to promethean about the deep state, and how its inception is attributable to the printing press, which prompted the English ruling class to pre-emptively construct a state-critical apparatus so as to produce before the public could get organized around its own ideas, a manufacture of consent, as Chomsky put it.

I went to look closer at the period of the printing press, which wiki gives as 1440.
Unwittingly at first I went to google 15th century philosophers. Google didn't seem aware that this means from the 1400s not the 1500s, so I went to 13th century philosophers and saw a list of ecclesiastical honorables, in short, Aristoteleans. Id been there before, during my study of philosophers in alphabetical order last year, which was what prompted me to buy the works of Francis Bacon (I had not arrived at the B yet, so, no) - I had noticed that the philosophers were all most all both Aristotelean and Christian; Aristotle had completely usurped this millennium with thousands of wise men whom we all now consider to be less even than trite. All that had existed for many centuries was the process of copying Aristotelean volumes into new, slightly enhanced Aristotelean volumes, all of which say very little to inspire a thought process in the world. But then comes the printing press!

Suddenly, documents must be produced to be sold.
And fast!

It is not out of the ballpark to assume that the revival of philosophy is to be attributed to the technological advance of mass-publication, I am sure many have come to this conclusion before; the birth of bread writing freed us from Aristotle.
Not long after 1440, Machiavelli was born and the rest is history. Francis Bacon took the hint and understood that thought doesn't need to be aimed at refining the consequences of pre-established categories, substances, qualities and attributes, but can also be aimed at the future, as conquest. Thought as a form of conquest, inductive methods, the production of the scientific method, the unification of thought and power, and the disclosing of the concept of a makable future.

Nietzsche once quipped that the printing press has been the greatest disaster to ever befall mankind, and nowadays its hard not to agree to some point. But if it weren't for this hype-producing magical object, humanity might simply have been too lazy to emerge from the dark ages.



Such 'laziness' would have been preferable to the anxiety ridden opposite , of, what's prevent today.

By far, if there ever could have been any 'democratically' arranger vote on the matter.

Of course, with a contemporaneous aesthetic impression withstanding.

The age of illuminated texts did offer with while comfort to the multitude of faithful!