A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

This is the main board for discussing philosophy - formal, informal and in between.

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Sat Feb 22, 2020 8:52 am

...Some people just can't take a hint.



To return to the theme of a "Guide to Ethical Decision-making" it should be noted that to make a wise and good Ethical decision, it helps to know one's Ethics. Then one recognizes whether the decision one is making is Ethical.

Then, for example, one recognizes early whether one wants to vote for a guy who regards women as merely sexual objects. [Recall an Access Hollywood video that came out three days before the 2015-2016 selection of a candidate to head their party. In the video a candidate is distinctly heard to say: "I can grab women by the cr==ch ..." Those who did not mind having a crude (con-artist money-launderer, who didn't pay his sub-contractors for their work), in the highest office of their country went right ahead and made him their candidate. Others voted in the election for someone of this character anyway.] Did they know Ethics?

An excellent way to know Ethics is to study the content of the References listed in the signature below. The material there is clear and written in plain, easy-to-read language.

:idea: At the very outset of Basic Ethics: a systematic approach, in the Foreword, a philosophical argument for its concept of Meta-Philosophy is offered. {How often have you read some Meta-Philosophy?} Then value-theory is offered as meta-Ethics. Then it gets to Ethics. ...a logical procedure.
Once Ethics is explained and understood practical applications -- such as how to decide who to vote for -- are discussed.
The comments in that booklet on Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan turn out to be quite relevant these days! 8)

Also see: http://www.wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadehar ... ETHICS.pdf - which employs the literary device of a dialog, or conversation.

Tell us your impressions and views on the topic......
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
thinkdr
Thinker
 
Posts: 800
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 7:05 pm

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Sun Mar 01, 2020 8:45 am

In an earlier post I commented:
thinkdr wrote:...Perhaps the whole program can be summed up in 7 imperative words:

Be kind. Do no harm. Grow morally.


If one wants to write about Ethics, consider that the structure of it can be simplified into these three parts.

I) Being kind.

II) Doing no harm.

III) Growing morally.

The Golden Rule and its variants would be discussed in volume one. This guide to Ethical decision-making suggests that you treat others as you would want to be treated[/b

Upon each encounter or interaction with others, one is to ask oneself: How can I create value here and now so that each of us can be a winner!? Peter Demerest has titled this "The Central Question of Life."

Also in that section would be an explanation of how kindness can be immoderate:overdone. Good manners, however, are always in style. In Oriental cultures people bow, nod their heads, as a sign of respect when encountering one another. It helps to hold the culture together.

This part of the book would also discuss in depth Humility; and Moral Courage (as exhibited by 'whistle-blowers' who want to keep their jobs but who are moved by their conscieence to expose wrong-doing and corruption.)

What it means in practice to avoid harming, and to avoid being offensive, would be the content of the second volume or subsection of the book....


Now I offer some further reflections regarding the Moral Principle: DO NO HARM!

To do harm to someone is to cause (or her) to be worse off than before.

If a Quality Life {a QL} has, say, six components, and as a result of something you said or did this individual-you-may-have-harmed had four of the components before, and now has only three of them, then it is the case that you did harm to him. He is worse off than before.

One of the components of a QL is well-being. That concept was discussed in THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS booklet. (Well-being itself has several sub-components.) Another component of a QL is: a sense of purpose.

An ideal goal of an ethical world is that eventually [b]everyone enjoys a QL., i.e., everyone has well-being, a sense of financial security, quality time with those they love, peace-of-mind, happiness, etc.

Do you have any comments, or additions, to help us understand the concepts of "harming," "well-being" or anything else relevant to the principles of Ethics?

Speak up. Let's hear your views.
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
thinkdr
Thinker
 
Posts: 800
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 7:05 pm

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby iambiguous » Sun Mar 01, 2020 9:44 pm

thinkdr wrote:
Now I offer some further reflections regarding the Moral Principle: DO NO HARM!

To do harm to someone is to cause (or her) to be worse off than before.

If a Quality Life {a QL} has, say, six components, and as a result of something you said or did this individual-you-may-have-harmed had four of the components before, and now has only three of them, then it is the case that you did harm to him. He is worse off than before.

One of the components of a QL is well-being. That concept was discussed in THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS booklet. (Well-being itself has several sub-components.) Another component of a QL is: a sense of purpose.

An ideal goal of an ethical world is that eventually everyone enjoys a QL., i.e., everyone has well-being, a sense of financial security, quality time with those they love, peace-of-mind, happiness, etc.

Do you have any comments, or additions, to help us understand the concepts of "harming," "well-being" or anything else relevant to the principles of Ethics?

Speak up. Let's hear your views.


Again, there's how you think about human morality in what I construe to be your "general description intellectual contraption" above.

Then there is how I insist on bringing theoretical assessments of this sort out into the world of the..."particular context".

Consider:

John is about to be executed for killing Jim. Some insist that the execution itself does harm to their own rendition of a civilized society. Others insist that, on the contrary, harm -- a grave injustice -- is done to the victim and his loved ones if the ultimate penalty is not imposed.

Then both camps go back a forth with a whole slew of specific points, aimed at shifting harm from one side to the other: https://deathpenalty.procon.org/

After all, look at the harm that is done to John's wife and kids. His friends and loved ones. He is executed but they pay a price as well. And they are often completely innocent.

All I do here, in turn, is to suggest that in many important respects, our own morality and value judgments are rooted more in the life that we live -- in dasein -- than in any theoretical/philosophical/political argument that can be made. Arguments which can never take into account all of the hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of existential variables that go into the making of any particular "I" confronting a particular situation involving the death penalty.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
User avatar
iambiguous
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 36116
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 8:03 pm
Location: baltimore maryland

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby surreptitious75 » Sun Mar 01, 2020 10:59 pm

In Islam when someone has been murdered the judgement is delivered by the victims own family
They can forgive him and let him go or else find him guilty and give him life or the death penalty
And if they choose forgiveness that will count in their favour on the day of judgement before God

One of the terrorists responsible for the Indonesian bombing was forgiven this year by the son of one of the men he murdered
He will have to serve out his sentence as he was already in prison but that son certainly deserves Paradise if it actually exists
To forgive the man who murdered your own father is truly remarkable and is probably beyond almost anyones ability to do so
A MIND IS LIKE A PARACHUTE : IT DOES NOT WORK UNLESS IT IS OPEN
surreptitious75
Philosopher
 
Posts: 1393
Joined: Sun Aug 27, 2017 5:48 pm

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Tue Mar 03, 2020 3:23 am

Well said! That man who forgave the murderer of his father sets a good example for the rest of us.

Also, this may be of interest.

I came upon some quotes from a wise man named Yochnan Posner. Perhaps these words can serve as guides to good decision-making:

“To the ancients, poverty and suffering were unfortunate facts of life for the unlucky to bear alone. [Today we have] the concept of social responsibility

“…Early societies considered human history as fixed in an endless cycle of war and conquest, and that it is fruitless to hope for more.”

“We can, must, and will change the world for the better/; war will eventually cease. Justice and kindness will eventually prevail. We can escape the cycle by having respect for every person’s life, by having a balance between work and leisure, by having a guiding purpose, and by believing in progress --- Y. Posner


Your thoughts on these themes?
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
thinkdr
Thinker
 
Posts: 800
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 7:05 pm

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Fri Mar 06, 2020 11:57 pm

In the previous post I brought up various concepts.

For example, social responsibility, justice, balance, purposefulness, and progress.

Also mentioned was the diminishing of the waging of war, and eventual cessation of war altogether. http://www.worldwithoutwar.com

Is anyone here interested in discussing any of these topics further?? ...What are you interested in? Speak up. Let us know.

My major concern is Moral Philosophy, theoretical and applied. I'd like to know: do you care about ethics?
Also, if you have read any of the selections listed below, please give me your impressions of it.
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
thinkdr
Thinker
 
Posts: 800
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 7:05 pm

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Tue Mar 10, 2020 9:32 am

A reporter named Jenny Anderson, writing for an internet publication titled QUARTZ, informed us of the following research findings:
In 2012, Oliver Scott Curry was an anthropology lecturer at the University of Oxford. One day, he organized a debate among his students about whether morality was innate or acquired. One side argued passionately that morality was the same everywhere; the other, that morals were different everywhere.
“I realized that, obviously, no one really knew, and so decided to find out for myself,” Curry says.

Seven years later, Curry, now a senior researcher at Oxford’s Institute for Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology, can offer up an answer to the seemingly ginormous question of what morality is and how it does—or doesn’t—vary around the world.

Morality, he says, is meant to promote cooperation. “People everywhere face a similar set of social problems, and use a similar set of moral rules to solve them,” he says as lead author of a paper recently published in Current Anthropology. “Everyone everywhere shares a common moral code. All agree that cooperating, promoting the common good, is the right thing to do.”

For the study, Curry’s group studied ethnographic accounts of ethics from 60 societies, across over 600 sources.


One statement in particular caught my eye: the scientist noted that "...All agree that cooperating, promoting the common good, is the right thing to do.

Do you, Gentle Reader, agree?

I'd love to know if the concept in that selected quote is what you employ as a guide to ethical decision-making. If it is, tell us specifically how. :?:
:arrow: How do you personally promote the common good, and/or encourage cooperation?
O:)
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
thinkdr
Thinker
 
Posts: 800
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 7:05 pm

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Sat Mar 21, 2020 12:13 am

When confronted with an ethical dilemma with regard to which one may care enough to get involved, here are some guidelines:

Ethical behavior is the product of moral sensitivity, (= recognition of the Intrinsic worth of each individual). of moral judgment, moral focus (motivation), and of moral character.

The following is a quote from a book by the late Rushworth Kidder. He was for many years the Executive Director and President of The Institute for Global Ethics: The book’s title is: Ethical Decision Making and Behavior.

Increase your sensitivity to potential ethical issues through perspective-taking, using moral terminology, and being sensitive to the relevant issues, and to the presence of moral emotions like anger, disgust, guilt, or sympathy.

Improve your ability to make moral judgments by creating an ethical environment that provides ethical role models and guidelines, continuing your education with a special focus on ethics, considering the needs and perspectives of broader audiences, and basing your decisions on widely accepted moral principles and guidelines.

Foster your moral motivation and that of followers by rewarding ethical choices, responding to moral emotions, and controlling negative feelings.

Your chances of following through on ethical decisions (moral character) are higher if you demonstrate virtue, believe you have some control over events in your life, and develop the necessary skills to put your plan into action.
Decision-making guidelines can help you make better ethical choices. Possible ethical decision-making formats include Kidder’s ethical checkpoints, the SAD formula, Nash’s 12 questions, and the case study method. The particular format you choose is not as important as taking a systematic approach to ethical decision making.

Whatever format you follow, make every effort to gather in-depth, current, and accurate information.

Creativity is as vital in making ethical decisions as it is in generating new products and programs. Sometimes you can come up with a “third way” that resolves ethical conflicts.

Moral dilemmas often involve clashes between two core (good) values. Common right-versus-right dilemmas are truth versus loyalty, short term versus long term, individual versus community, and justice versus mercy.

Think of ethical deliberation as an ongoing process. You may go through a sequence of steps and use them again. Return to your decision later to evaluate and learn from it. As soon as one ethical crisis passes, there’s likely to be another on the horizon.

Don’t expect perfection. As a leader, make the best choice you can after thorough deliberation but recognize that sometimes you may have to choose between two flawed alternatives.
]

SOURCE: http://www.uk.sagepub.com/upm-data/39590_Chapter7.pdf See pp. 29-30.
For details and deeper explanations you will want to read the entire chapter 7 of that book. It offers the pros and the cons which a research process entails. It provides arguments for each claim as to which is the effective procedure when resolving moral dilemmas. This Chaper 7 is illustrated with case studies. Reflecting upon these sharpens your moral decision-making capabilities.

Feedback?

Tell us, did you once resolve a moral dilemma? We welcome suggestions from your own experience in ethical decision-making!
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
thinkdr
Thinker
 
Posts: 800
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 7:05 pm

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Tue Mar 24, 2020 12:29 am

DEFINING ETHICS

Ethics is about evaluating moral values and principles, and is concerned with working out a basis on which to follow these principles. These principles are neither rules nor absolutes; they are rather voluntary guidelines designed to make life easier, more comfortable, and more trouble-free. To comply with the moral principles, is "right." Not to, is "wrong."

Compassionate acts, such as are seen when a person gives a helping hand to another individual, something that occurs every day, are evidence of an objective moral order. Allow me to explain: Human beings want to survive. Actually they want more than mere survival. We are pre-wired to seek our personal benefit, of which survival is a minimum necessary requirement.

What does it take to survive? Well, it is a fact of Biology that for a cell in our body to be healthy it helps if the cells surrounding it are healthy. In the same way, if you, or I, or any individual, gets in trouble then we need our neighbors and family to help us out. We need the people around us. Let's call them "our support group."

Isn't it so that each of the people around us has people around them who could serve as their support group? This keeps them strong. If one of the people around us, if anyone our support group has an infectious disease it is going to threaten the health of others in the group and make them less strong. This is just plain common sense!

So, we deduce, since you need the people around you as your suport, you also need the people around them. And where does it stop? It doesn't. Therefore by logical reasoning we conclude that we need the entire human species as our "support group."

It would seem that this is a basic fact of empirical ethics: The human race is a support group for each human individual.

We are, in conclusion, interdependent. [Let's be mindful of this so that we may have awareness.] And thus it is in our personal best interest to cooperate.

Hence, let us seek harmonious cooperation; and we will be "doing the right thing."

The essence of my theory is that "Ethics" is a perspective ...a perspective on a human individual, or group of them. It arises when we view the human being as highly valuable, of indefinitely-high value. Also, the theory indicates that - if we are ethical - we will make things better, morally better. We are to add value if we want to be ethical. Lots of implications may be deduced from that definition (of the concept "Ethics") and from that basic idea: Make things better!

One of them is: Do no harm! This in turn implies a renunciation of violence, cruelty, ruthless exploitation, greed, self-mutilation, lack of humility, etc.

What do you think with regard to any of these matters? Your comments, questions, and diiscussion are most welcome. Speak up.
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
thinkdr
Thinker
 
Posts: 800
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 7:05 pm

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Sun Apr 12, 2020 8:53 am

On abortion and euthanasia -- an analysis

The question is asked by Surreptitious:

While most of us agree that murder is wrong ….morally wrong, what about the matter of the legalization of abortion – or the issue of euthanasia? There are those who think these acts constitute murder.

Person A says both abortion and euthanasia are instances of murder and neither of them should be legalized.

Person B says that both abortion and euthanasia should be legalized; neither of them is murder.

How can we demonstrate logically that one is definitely right ethically, and one is definitely wrong - and which would it be?
Can such a proposition actually be demonstrated?


The answer is to define our central terms with precision.
Therefor, let us define the term “murder”in a measurable and concise way –and refer only to murder in the first degree:

Def. 1. “Human being" as understood here is "an individual having a personality.'
Def. 2. “Murder” [according to the Merriam Webster Dictionary] is defined as:
The killing of another human being with malice aforethought, characterized by deliberation or premeditation.

Thus, murder, by definition, is the premeditated killing of another person (an individual with personality) involving along with it some malice and some deliberation.


[It is also murder in the first degree if the muDrer occurs during the 3commission of another serious crime, as robbery or arson (first-degree murder, or murder one), and murder by intent but without deliberation or premeditation (second-degree murder, Murdertwo). So murder, occurring spontaneously in a fit of rage, is murer in the second degree. .
Juries may decide that the killing was accidental and this might, in U.S. law, be labeled ‘Murder in the third degree.”]



Murder is morally wrong. Since neither a woman’s decision to abort her fetus, nor the process of euthanasia, involve any malice they are not examples of murder. With regard to the woman …it is, after all, her body – especially if the procedure is done before the fetus displays any signs of consciousness. If her doctor, for humanitarian reasons justifiably decides to perform a surgery late in the term it is ethical but perhaps earns a lower degree of morality than if the procedure takes place early in the pregnancy.
The woman has the same right to have an abortion as a man has the right to decide to have a vasectomy or any other elective surgery on his own body.

Any free person given oxygen in a medical setting has a right either to pull the oxygen mask off his face or to decline the offer of being put on a ventilator. This is equivalent to the right to ask to be put on hospice since one is suffering constant physical pain. Both are cases of voluntary suicide, in a sense, akin to euthanasia.

Comments?
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
thinkdr
Thinker
 
Posts: 800
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 7:05 pm

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby iambiguous » Sun Apr 12, 2020 6:58 pm

thinkdr wrote:
The answer is to define our central terms with precision.
Therefor, let us define the term “murder”in a measurable and concise way –and refer only to murder in the first degree:

Def. 1. “Human being" as understood here is "an individual having a personality.'
Def. 2. “Murder” [according to the Merriam Webster Dictionary] is defined as:
The killing of another human being with malice aforethought, characterized by deliberation or premeditation.

Thus, murder, by definition, is the premeditated killing of another person (an individual with personality) involving along with it some malice and some deliberation.


Definitional morality?!
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
User avatar
iambiguous
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 36116
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 8:03 pm
Location: baltimore maryland

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Sun Apr 12, 2020 9:04 pm

iambiguous wrote:
thinkdr wrote:
The answer is to define our central terms with precision.
Therefor, let us define the term “murder”in a measurable and concise way –and refer only to murder in the first degree: ...

...Thus, murder, by definition, is the premeditated killing of another person involving along with it some malice and some deliberation.


Definitional morality?!



Thank you for your question.

Bertrand Russel showed us how to do an analysis. Would anyone deny that he was a philosopher?
Analytic Philosophy proceeds by defining terms. This is also essential to the method of science.


Does anyone else have any questions or comments? Reviews? Interpretations? Improvements to suggest?
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
thinkdr
Thinker
 
Posts: 800
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 7:05 pm

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby iambiguous » Sun Apr 12, 2020 9:32 pm

iambiguous wrote:
Definitional morality?!



thinkdr wrote:Thank you for your question.

Bertrand Russel showed us how to do an analysis. Would anyone deny that he was a philosopher?
Analytic Philosophy proceeds by defining terms. This is also essential to the method of science.


Okay, let's focus in on a context in which particular behaviors come into conflict over that which is deemed to be either morally right or morally wrong. And then discuss how an analysis from Bertrand Russell...an analysis derived from definitions...coupled with all that science might inform us of, can aid and abet us in either reconciling these conflicting goods or even in resolving them.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
User avatar
iambiguous
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 36116
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 8:03 pm
Location: baltimore maryland

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Mon Apr 13, 2020 7:46 pm

In your thread in re "Man amidst Mankind" your dilemma seems to be how to make an intelligent distinction between the personal self [the 'me' that you know] and the roles that you play [such as U.S. citizen, male, white guy, member of the human race], etc.

The genius philosopher, Robert S. Hartman, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_S._Hartman gave us a way to do that when he invented/discovered the three basic dimensions of value on the values spectrum. They are S, E, and I - which are abbreviations for Systemic Value, Extrinsic Value, and Intrinsic Value.

Your dilemma is resolved by comprehending that your Self can be analyzed all three ways: Systemically you are a statistic "one organism among billions," "a member of the human species," "a white male, with all the privileges that bestows," etc.

Extrinsically you are, say for example, a "father," "a barber," "a writer," "a Martin Heidegger fan," "someone with a good memory, and a keen sense of smell," "at times I'm quite a gambler, although I'm usually risk-aversive," etc., etc.

Intrinsically you are the one who tells himself, who affirms "I am that I am." "I'm my self-identity, my moral principles and high standards: I won't shop-lift even if tempted, I won't cheat," etc." "I feel good-will toward everyone," "I radiate love," "I am glad I have some responsibility." "I'm ready to help out if I can," Etc., etc.

You may say to yourself: "All of the above comprise my self-concept."

Bottom line: we all have multiple selves.

...And we'll never leave this world alive! True security is to realize: there is no security. We are all vulnerable, fallible, and - unless we have the gifts of a Mark Twain, an Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli, or a Plato, who will remember us 100 years from now? Only our legacy lives on.

Comments?
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
thinkdr
Thinker
 
Posts: 800
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 7:05 pm

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby iambiguous » Wed Apr 15, 2020 6:15 pm

thinkdr wrote: In your thread in re "Man amidst Mankind" your dilemma seems to be how to make an intelligent distinction between the personal self [the 'me' that you know] and the roles that you play [such as U.S. citizen, male, white guy, member of the human race], etc.


Actually, it is more about how the two become intertwined for any particular "I" out in any particular world such that the myriad variables that come to encompass "I", first genetically, and then memetically [historically, culturally and experientially], in a world bursting at the seams with contingency, chance and change, would impact one's reaction to conflicting goods in that given set of circumstances.

And here I suggest to others that they themselves choose that context.

Instead...

thinkdr wrote: The genius philosopher, Robert S. Hartman, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_S._Hartman gave us a way to do that when he invented/discovered the three basic dimensions of value on the values spectrum. They are S, E, and I - which are abbreviations for Systemic Value, Extrinsic Value, and Intrinsic Value.

Your dilemma is resolved by comprehending that your Self can be analyzed all three ways: Systemically you are a statistic "one organism among billions," "a member of the human species," "a white male, with all the privileges that bestows," etc.

Extrinsically you are, say for example, a "father," "a barber," "a writer," "a Martin Heidegger fan," "someone with a good memory, and a keen sense of smell," "at times I'm quite a gambler, although I'm usually risk-aversive," etc., etc.

Intrinsically you are the one who tells himself, who affirms "I am that I am." "I'm my self-identity, my moral principles and high standards: I won't shop-lift even if tempted, I won't cheat," etc." "I feel good-will toward everyone," "I radiate love," "I am glad I have some responsibility." "I'm ready to help out if I can," Etc., etc.

You may say to yourself: "All of the above comprise my self-concept."

Bottom line: we all have multiple selves.

...And we'll never leave this world alive! True security is to realize: there is no security. We are all vulnerable, fallible, and - unless we have the gifts of a Mark Twain, an Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli, or a Plato, who will remember us 100 years from now? Only our legacy lives on.

Comments?


Okay, but what do your points here actually have to do my post above:

"...let's focus in on a context in which particular behaviors come into conflict over that which is deemed to be either morally right or morally wrong. And then discuss how an analysis from Bertrand Russell...an analysis derived from definitions...coupled with all that science might inform us of, can aid and abet us in either reconciling these conflicting goods or even in resolving them."

Or, better still, let's focus in on a context pertaining to your "analysis" derived from your definitions coupled with all that science might have to offer in regard to either reconciling or resolving conflicting behaviors derived from conflicting value judgments pertaining to a context of your choice.

From my frame of mind, you still want the discussion to revolve largely around "serious philosophers" exchanging "general description intellectual contraptions" about ethics.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
User avatar
iambiguous
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 36116
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 8:03 pm
Location: baltimore maryland

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Fri Apr 17, 2020 2:43 am

iambiguous wrote:
thinkdr wrote:
Bottom line: we all have multiple selves. ...And we... are all vulnerable, fallible, and ...100 years from now only our legacy lives on


Okay, but :... from my frame of mind, you still want the discussion to revolve largely around "serious philosophers" exchanging "general description intellectual contraptions" about ethics.


WTF

Yes, at this site I want to do philosophy; and if it can be done seriously, so much the better. Once here I gave an illustrative dilemma to resolve, and no interest was shown in that thread. I presented a real-life, dramatic example, but it didn't help:No one cared about it. It was about a Woman's Health counselor who had an STD from an ex-boyfriend; and she had a counselee who came in with an STD she caught from the same guy. I titled the thread "How Resolve This Dilemma?" Only about ten people opened it up to read it. No one had any comment on it.


I requested, iambiguous, that you initiate a thread or a post on ethics which does things your way, without the "intellectual contraptions" that I have, which either irritate you, or 'turn you off.' That way we will both be happy.

Good luck with your thread!
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
thinkdr
Thinker
 
Posts: 800
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 7:05 pm

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Sat Apr 18, 2020 2:11 am

See the reviews of a precious book by Schoof & Clark entitled Living a Richer Life.
https://www.amazon.com/product-reviews/ ... ewpoints=1
Then decide if you want to read it.

It contains some valuable guides to Ethical decision-making.
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
thinkdr
Thinker
 
Posts: 800
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 7:05 pm

Previous

Return to Philosophy



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot]