The 3 Christs of Ypsilanti

The origins of the imperative, "know thyself", are lost in the sands of time, but the age-old examination of human consciousness continues here.

The 3 Christs of Ypsilanti

Postby Karpel Tunnel » Tue Apr 09, 2019 11:17 am

This was a book written by a psychologist who brought together three men who each believed they were Jesus. He decided to try this when he heard about how when two women who each believed they were the Virgin Mary were brought together, one of them gave up her delusion. So he thought it might be a good intervention for the three men.

I find myself thinking that the dialogue here, in certain specific interactions, is structurally similar to, and heading closer to, the types of arguments the three Christs got into when they first encountered each other. Similar anger and categorizations of the others. They eventually calmed down, having each decided the other two were mental patients or dead or being operated by machines.
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Re: The 3 Christs of Ypsilanti

Postby Meno_ » Tue Apr 09, 2019 3:35 pm

But were they pastored by religious or treated by psychiatrist?

Because, if the later, a religious well known notion could have been brought up, to try breaking the delusion, that Christ is a state of mind. not a persona, fitting in with the relifious archetype of the Trinity, which has been induced by rote into any deeply religious person.

It is evident that people afflicted with religious mania are prone to personify and identify with Christ.

Any shrink should know this.
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Re: The 3 Christs of Ypsilanti

Postby Karpel Tunnel » Tue Apr 09, 2019 3:42 pm

Meno_ wrote:But were they pastored by religious or treated by psychiatrist?

They were under psychiatric/psychological care.

Because, if the later, a religious well known notion could have been brought up, to try breaking the delusion, that Christ is a state of mind. not a persona, fitting in with the relifious archetype of the Trinity, which has been induced by rote into any deeply religious person.
I think a believer could have taken that tack with them. But I think that their particular belief - it's been a long time since I read this - meant that they each as individuals considered themselves special.

It would have been odd for the psychologist - who I don't think was a believer in any version of Christianity - to approach the issue theologically.

But it certainly might have helped them interpersonally. Of course the idea was that the interpersonal conflict might lead them to question their own individual beliefs. And, of course, you're right there might have been a few ways for them to rationalize/readjust their beliefs in the face of mirrored souls.

It is evident that people afflicted with religious mania are prone to personify and identify with Christ.

Any shrink must know this .
Sure, that wasn't the novel part. The novel part was seeing if faced with people with the same delusion, this might shake their delusions loose. It did not work. There were moments when it seemed to bring one or two of them to question their own belief, but this did not last.

I think it was an interesting idea. And there are many situations where seeing people with similar cognitive bad habits can make it easier to break one's own bad patterns.

Here, at ILP, I don't see it working in some of the more outlandish cases.
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Re: The 3 Christs of Ypsilanti

Postby Meno_ » Tue Apr 09, 2019 4:12 pm

The sad part is, that the church can not change it's teaching methodology, leading to a probable conclusion that they see religious mania associated with the magic of miracles , which rests on a non-differentiable presumption.

In fact the basis lays on biblical references , such as Moses and the burning Bush, the parting of the see.
Basing thinking on visionary per(pre)ception, as modus operans, is like leading a blind person into a maze.

The legitimacy of the Church teaching depends on this. This is considered a necessary and inconvenient method to save the normal churchgoer , who does not. fall prey to such equally necessary presumptive teachings.
Presumptions , though, are far more necessary, refer to the modern idea, that 'if god did not exist, He would need to be created'.
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Re: The 3 Christs of Ypsilanti

Postby Karpel Tunnel » Tue Apr 09, 2019 10:31 pm

Meno_ wrote:The sad part is, that the church can not change it's teaching methodology, leading to a probable conclusion that they see religious mania associated with the magic of miracles , which rests on a non-differentiable presumption.
I find it hard, fairly often, to know exactly what you mean. It seems like you are saying that the way the church teaches leaves people open to being like those three men. But actually it doesn't, since the current church does not allow for reincarnation. On the general issue, or drawing conclusions based on revelation or private experiences, this does create swingroom, though most of us make all sorts of decisions on similar grounds, religious or not. They just tend not to be metaphysical decisions.
In fact the basis lays on biblical references , such as Moses and the burning Bush, the parting of the see.
Basing thinking on visionary per(pre)ception, as modus operans, is like leading a blind person into a maze.
If you have not been mentored, have little experience, get no feedback, do not try to see what the revelations provide as information and what happens when you work with it. Like shamans, say, or sunyasi.
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Re: The 3 Christs of Ypsilanti

Postby Meno_ » Wed Apr 10, 2019 2:01 am

Actually I was a practicing Catholic most of my life, so I was thought .All the other stuff You write, goes by me as well.

Familiarity with other faiths has bearing on our life , as well, so i guess
Inter-disciplar is the best I can describe myself .

Tha shamanic experience , similarly has been a worthwhile experience.
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