Noble Lies, Noble Lives

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Re: Noble Lies, Noble Lives

Postby Bob » Fri Dec 13, 2013 9:14 pm

anon wrote:I think the stories we tell ourselves, especially the ones we unquestionably believe, create our experiences. "Raw awareness" may involve no stories, but the stories' power will return, once you begin living your day-to-day life again. Just reading this post involves stories, which help to determine your present experience while you read. For instance you have an idea of who I am and where I'm coming from. You have an idea of what it is you're doing here, and why you will or will not respond to this post. You will feel certain emotions while you read this post (more so if I praise or insult you), and those emotions have been shaped by an endless series of stories that other have told you and that you have told yourself.

If it's not clear, I think all such stories are acts of the imagination.

This has been an idea that has been occupying my thoughts for some time too - as may be apparent in several of my posts. I regarded myself just as a storyteller but I came to realise that we all are, even if most of us only tell ourselves those stories, except perhaps for an inner circle or a partner, who we share our stories with. The more we share these stories, the more feedback we receive, which is often what we avoid. However, it is the fact that we tell ourselves stories that makes us open to other stories, and it is this aspect of "reality" that makes us selective with regard to the reality we prefer.

Strangely, we cannot avoid telling ourselves these stories and the use of logic and rationality only preoccupies us for a short period of time and then we're back with the stories (and with the endless repeats). In fact, those people who are openly critical of this are often those who are the most under the influence of their stories. The imagination is a good thing, if we could only be very aware of the fact that we are continually telling stories and sometime we confabulate - even to ourselves. The human being is very often not the sentient being he would like to be, but we have to practice sentience to be good at it.
The only wisdom we can hope to acquire
Is the wisdom of humility: humility is endless.
TS Eliot
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Re: Noble Lies, Noble Lives

Postby anon » Sat Dec 14, 2013 12:11 am

Bob wrote:
anon wrote:I think the stories we tell ourselves, especially the ones we unquestionably believe, create our experiences. "Raw awareness" may involve no stories, but the stories' power will return, once you begin living your day-to-day life again. Just reading this post involves stories, which help to determine your present experience while you read. For instance you have an idea of who I am and where I'm coming from. You have an idea of what it is you're doing here, and why you will or will not respond to this post. You will feel certain emotions while you read this post (more so if I praise or insult you), and those emotions have been shaped by an endless series of stories that other have told you and that you have told yourself.

If it's not clear, I think all such stories are acts of the imagination.

This has been an idea that has been occupying my thoughts for some time too - as may be apparent in several of my posts. I regarded myself just as a storyteller but I came to realise that we all are, even if most of us only tell ourselves those stories, except perhaps for an inner circle or a partner, who we share our stories with. The more we share these stories, the more feedback we receive, which is often what we avoid. However, it is the fact that we tell ourselves stories that makes us open to other stories, and it is this aspect of "reality" that makes us selective with regard to the reality we prefer.

Strangely, we cannot avoid telling ourselves these stories and the use of logic and rationality only preoccupies us for a short period of time and then we're back with the stories (and with the endless repeats). In fact, those people who are openly critical of this are often those who are the most under the influence of their stories. The imagination is a good thing, if we could only be very aware of the fact that we are continually telling stories and sometime we confabulate - even to ourselves. The human being is very often not the sentient being he would like to be, but we have to practice sentience to be good at it.

I agree, Bob.
"Distraction is the only thing that consoles us for our miseries, and yet it is itself the greatest of our miseries." - Blaise Pascal

"The bombs we plant in each other are ticking away." - Edward Yang

"To a fly that likes the smell of putrid / Meat the fragrance of sandalwood is foul. / Beings who discard Nirvana / Covet coarse Samsara's realm." - Saraha
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