Note to all billionaires especially those with holdings 50 b

Discussion of the recent unfolding of history.

Re: Note to all billionaires especially those with holdings

Postby ralfy » Tue Oct 08, 2019 4:22 am

Meno_ wrote:
ralfy wrote:
Meno_ wrote:
I think so as well, with that point probably passed with ex
President Carter's push for growth limits and conservation.
He became an unpopular one-termer, for this , for the most part.


This contradicts your earlier statement, that these limits can be expanded.


Good Observation:

Sure for at least 2 reasons.

The first is an anti derivative differentiation toward an absolute .
In Marxian terms , it is through the concept of diminishing returns that a perpetual expansion of value has to take place. But incrementability subscribes to divisibility of available assets against demand.

If markets are not growing at the same rate as the supply is either over or underproduced, the producer will fix prices by dumping oversupplies into waste, rather then reduce prices.

The divisbility of supply, will tend to represent a model of infinite progression, where there never will be an absolute lack of supply, only the prices put on them will rise accordingly.

This is the whole idea behind the NWO, primarily, and secondarily, the threat of nuclear world war.

The other rationale is purely philosophical, and it has to do with Trumpism's neo-Kantian resurgence, which does emphasize negative values associated with ontological negation and contradictions in material synthesis , that structuralism has not been able to edify.

The contradiction of having reached limits and being unlimited by it's perpetual mobility toward an unreachable absolute are both contradictory and not.


Even if prices are removed, there will still be an absolute lack of supply because of physical limitations.
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Re: Note to all billionaires especially those with holdings

Postby Meno_ » Tue Oct 08, 2019 3:50 pm

there are two ways to go after this the first is if you keep halving the supply, you never run out. At least not until the planetary orbit keeps us fairly safe.
We can subsist on far less by wasting far less.

The second is the misconception about saving supplies.


Once there was a man a fairly good and heroic man, trying to do good and he lived with his father in law who was a Chinese emperor.
This is a story my old grandad told me.
This simply heroic man did something useful and life saving for the emperor, and the emperor told him he would grant him anything he wished for. (Within reason)
So the guy thought about it and said all I want is one grain of rice on a square on a chess board.
Then 2 grains on the second square 4 on the third and so on until all the squares are covered.
The emperor thought his sin in law lost it, and readily agreed, thinking what a fool ,he could have asked for half the kingdom.
So the order was given to comply, and the emperor went to sleep.

Next morning, alarmed underlings woke up the emperor in great frenzy and told him that there is no amount of rice in China to be able to provide enough rice for the hero.
The emperor was incredulous.

Well doubling shows the same propensity to halving, but upwards. There is physically no limit either forwards or backwards to reach an absolute supply.
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Re: Note to all billionaires especially those with holdings

Postby Meno_ » Mon Oct 14, 2019 6:50 pm

The number of billionaires world wide is increasing, directly corresponding to the effects of evaluating currencies. Low end billionaires like Trump and Oprah, (around 2 nil.) are dwarfed by top of the line ones like the Wal-Mart' s and the like.

Millionites are becoming mere upper middle class figures, still clunking to less subtle forms of identification , such as ascribing social class with the car they drive.


The United States has the most billionaires in the world, with 420 more than the next closest country, China, according to Wealth-X's 2019 Billionaire Census report. There are 705 billionaires in the United States, 285 in China, 146 in Germany, 102 in Russia, and 97 in the United Kingdom.

The combined net worth of US billionaires exceeds the total billionaire wealth of the next eight highest-ranked countries (China, Germany, Russia, United Kingdom, Switzerland, Hong Kong, India, and Saudi Arabia).

The report further stated that the top 15 countries accounted for 75 percent of the global billionaire population. Collectively, the 1,942 billionaires in these 15 countries are worth $6.8 trillion — that accounts for 79 percent of total global billionaire wealth in 2018.

Here are the top 15 countries with the most billionaires in 2019.

1. United States
Jeff Bezos
Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos. Getty
Number of billionaires: 705

Total billionaire wealth: $3,013 billion

Richest Individual: Jeff Bezos ($118 billion)

2. China
Jack Ma
Jack Ma. VCG/VCG via Getty Images
Number of billionaires: 285

Total billionaire wealth: $996 billion

Richest Individual: Jack Ma ($41.8 billion)

3. Germany
dieter schwarz
Dieter Schwarz. http://www.60pages.com/north-and-south/
Number of billionaires: 146

Total billionaire wealth: $442 billion

Richest Individual: Dieter Schwarz ($23.6 billion)

4. Russia
moscow russia skyline
Moscow, Russia. Shutterstock
Number of billionaires: 102

Total billionaire wealth: $355 billion

Richest Individual: Leonid Mikhelson ($21.6 billion)

5. United Kingdom
Jim Ratcliffe
Jim Ratcliffe. AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth
Number of billionaires: 97

Total billionaire wealth: $209 billion

Richest Individual: Jim Ratcliffe ($18.7 billion)

6. Switzerland
ernesto bertarelli
Ernesto Bertarelli. AP PhotoKEYSTONE/Dominic Favre
Number of billionaires: 91

Total billionaire wealth: $240 billion

Richest Individual: Ernesto Bertarelli ($16 billion)

7. Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Hong Kong. Jessica Hromas/Getty Image
Number of billionaires: 87

Total billionaire wealth: $259 billion

Richest Individual: Li Ka-Shing ($30.8 billion)

8. India
Mukesh Ambani
Mukesh Ambani. Reuters/Amit Dave
Number of billionaires: 82

Total billionaire wealth: $284 billion

Richest Individual: Mukesh Ambani ($49.5 billion)

9. Saudi Arabia
saudi arabia
Saudi Arabia. adznano3/Shutterstock
Number of billionaires: 57

Total billionaire wealth: $147 billion

Richest Individual: Alwaleed Al Saud ($14.7 billion)

10. France
bernard arnault
Bernard Arnault. Reuters
Number of billionaires: 55

Total billionaire wealth: $195 billion

Richest Individual: Bernard Arnault ($88.5 billion)

11. United Arab Emirates
04_Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque_Abu Dhabi_United Arab Emirates
Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. TripAdvisor
Number of billionaires: 55

Total billionaire wealth: $165 billion

Richest Individual: Majid Al Futtaim ($5.13 billion)

12. Brazil
Jorge Lemann
Jorge Paulo Lemann. Scott Olson/Getty
Number of billionaires: 49

Total billionaire wealth: $154 billion

Richest Individual: Jorge Paulo Lemann ($22.4 billion)

13. Italy
Giovanni Ferrero
Giovanni Ferrero. REUTERS/Giorgio Perottino
Number of billionaires: 47

Total billionaire wealth: $141 billion

Richest Individual: Giovanni Ferrero ($24.2 billion)

14. Canada
Canada
Canada. Flickr/Kris Arnold
Number of billionaires: 45

Total billionaire wealth: $87 billion

Richest Individual: Sherry Brydson ($8.39 billion)

15. Singapore
Wee Cho Yaw
Wee Cho Yaw. Reuters
Number of billionaires: 39

Total billionaire wealth: $84 billion

Richest Individual: Wee Cho Yaw ($8.53 billion)



More: CEO World Contributor contributor 2019 Billionaire
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Re: Note to all billionaires especially those with holdings

Postby Meno_ » Mon Oct 14, 2019 6:53 pm

[quote="Meno_"]The number of billionaires world wide is increasing, directly corresponding to the effects of evaluating currencies. Low end billionaires like Trump and Oprah, (around 2 nil.) are dwarfed by top of the line ones like the Wal-Mart' s and the like.

Millionites are becoming mere upper middle class figures, still clunking to less subtle forms of identification , such as ascribing social class with the car they drive.


The United States has the most billionaires in the world, with 420 more than the next closest country, China, according to Wealth-X's 2019 Billionaire Census report. There are 705 billionaires in the United States, 285 in China, 146 in Germany, 102 in Russia, and 97 in the United Kingdom.

The combined net worth of US billionaires exceeds the total billionaire wealth of the next eight highest-ranked countries (China, Germany, Russia, United Kingdom, Switzerland, Hong Kong, India, and Saudi Arabia).

The report further stated that the top 15 countries accounted for 75 percent of the global billionaire population. Collectively, the 1,942 billionaires in these 15 countries are worth $6.8 trillion — that accounts for 79 percent of total global billionaire wealth in 2018.

Here are the top 15 countries with the most billionaires in 2019.

1. United States
Jeff Bezos
Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos. Getty
Number of billionaires: 705

Total billionaire wealth: $3,013 billion

Richest Individual: Jeff Bezos ($118 billion)

2. China
Jack Ma
Jack Ma. VCG/VCG via Getty Images
Number of billionaires: 285

Total billionaire wealth: $996 billion

Richest Individual: Jack Ma ($41.8 billion)

3. Germany
dieter schwarz
Dieter Schwarz. http://www.60pages.com/north-and-south/
Number of billionaires: 146

Total billionaire wealth: $442 billion

Richest Individual: Dieter Schwarz ($23.6 billion)

4. Russia
moscow russia skyline
Moscow, Russia. Shutterstock
Number of billionaires: 102

Total billionaire wealth: $355 billion

Richest Individual: Leonid Mikhelson ($21.6 billion)

5. United Kingdom
Jim Ratcliffe
Jim Ratcliffe. AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth
Number of billionaires: 97

Total billionaire wealth: $209 billion

Richest Individual: Jim Ratcliffe ($18.7 billion)

6. Switzerland
ernesto bertarelli
Ernesto Bertarelli. AP PhotoKEYSTONE/Dominic Favre
Number of billionaires: 91

Total billionaire wealth: $240 billion

Richest Individual: Ernesto Bertarelli ($16 billion)

7. Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Hong Kong. Jessica Hromas/Getty Image
Number of billionaires: 87

Total billionaire wealth: $259 billion

Richest Individual: Li Ka-Shing ($30.8 billion)

8. India
Mukesh Ambani
Mukesh Ambani. Reuters/Amit Dave
Number of billionaires: 82

Total billionaire wealth: $284 billion

Richest Individual: Mukesh Ambani ($49.5 billion)

9. Saudi Arabia
saudi arabia
Saudi Arabia. adznano3/Shutterstock
Number of billionaires: 57

Total billionaire wealth: $147 billion

Richest Individual: Alwaleed Al Saud ($14.7 billion)

10. France
bernard arnault
Bernard Arnault. Reuters
Number of billionaires: 55

Total billionaire wealth: $195 billion

Richest Individual: Bernard Arnault ($88.5 billion)

11. United Arab Emirates
04_Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque_Abu Dhabi_United Arab Emirates
Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. TripAdvisor
Number of billionaires: 55

Total billionaire wealth: $165 billion

Richest Individual: Majid Al Futtaim ($5.13 billion)

12. Brazil
Jorge Lemann
Jorge Paulo Lemann. Scott Olson/Getty
Number of billionaires: 49

Total billionaire wealth: $154 billion

Richest Individual: Jorge Paulo Lemann ($22.4 billion)

13. Italy
Giovanni Ferrero
Giovanni Ferrero. REUTERS/Giorgio Perottino
Number of billionaires: 47

Total billionaire wealth: $141 billion

Richest Individual: Giovanni Ferrero ($24.2 billion)

14. Canada
Canada
Canada. Flickr/Kris Arnold
Number of billionaires: 45

Total billionaire wealth: $87 billion

Richest Individual: Sherry Brydson ($8.39 billion)

15. Singapore
Wee Cho Yaw
Wee Cho Yaw. Reuters
Number of billionaires: 39

Total billionaire wealth: $84 billion

Richest Individual: Wee Cho Yaw ($8.53 billion)


At 3 % interest one billion can generate this much net a day:

=82, 191.00 ~ eighty two thousand one hundred ninety one dollars
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Re: Note to all billionaires especially those with holdings

Postby Meno_ » Mon Oct 14, 2019 7:11 pm

Here is what it cost to shelter LA's homeless-half of all US homeless:

https://laist.com/2018/06/22/heres_what ... helter.php



That is 657 million a year for half of US population per year. Double that is 1,314 billion a year. for total US approx. population for housing.Food may be double that , so maybe 3 billion or 150,000 dollars a day for the complete package per day.

Now, added to the argument that according to civic analysis, it would cost less to cover that then to manage the homeless population per municipal law, the question becomes inescapable , why prefer homelessness ?

The answer given by Silhouette, , that such a move would prove ideologically unproductive or logically unsound , makes some kind of sense.


I or, may be that such move would be overtly idiosyncratic.
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Re: Note to all billionaires especially those with holdings

Postby Meno_ » Wed Oct 16, 2019 8:23 pm

Here is one billionaire? Whom we all know by now, whose tax returns are being opened to scrutiny, and how it is beginning to shed some light into generally accepted business practices at the higher levels:

TRUMP, INC.

Never-Before-Seen Trump Tax Documents Show Major Inconsistencies

The president’s businesses made themselves appear more profitable to lenders and less profitable to tax officials. One expert calls the differing numbers “versions of fraud.”


One of President Donald Trump’s signature skyscrapers, at 40 Wall Street in New York. Documents reveal Trump shared conflicting cost and occupancy figures for the building with lenders.(

Documents obtained by ProPublica show stark differences in how Donald Trump’s businesses reported some expenses, profits and occupancy figures for two Manhattan buildings, giving a lender different figures than they provided to New York City tax authorities. The discrepancies made the buildings appear more profitable to the lender — and less profitable to the officials who set the buildings’ property tax.

For instance, Trump told the lender that he took in twice as much rent from one building as he reported to tax authorities during the same year, 2017. He also gave conflicting occupancy figures for one of his signature skyscrapers, located at 40 Wall Street.

Lenders like to see a rising occupancy level as a sign of what they call “leasing momentum.” Sure enough, the company told a lender that 40 Wall Street had been 58.9% leased on Dec. 31, 2012, and then rose to 95% a few years later. The company told tax officials the building was 81% rented as of Jan. 5, 2013.

A dozen real estate professionals told ProPublica they saw no clear explanation for multiple inconsistencies in the documents. The discrepancies are “versions of fraud,” said Nancy Wallace, a professor of finance and real estate at the Haas School of Business at the University of California-Berkeley. “This kind of stuff is not OK.”

New York City’s property tax forms state that the person signing them “affirms the truth of the statements made” and that “false filings are subject to all applicable civil and criminal penalties.”

The punishments for lying to tax officials, or to lenders, can be significant, ranging from fines to criminal fraud charges. Two former Trump associates, Michael Cohen and Paul Manafort, are serving prison time for offenses that include falsifying tax and bank records, some of them related to real estate.

“Certainly, if I were sitting in a prosecutor’s office, I would want to ask a lot more questions,” said Anne Milgram, a former attorney general for New Jersey who is now a professor at New York University School of Law.

Trump has previously been accused of manipulating numbers on his tax and loan documents, including by his former lawyer, Cohen. But Trump’s business is notoriously opaque, with records rarely surfacing, and up till now there’s been little documentary evidence supporting those claims.

That’s one reason that multiple governmental entities, including two congressional committees and the office of the Manhattan district attorney, have subpoenaed Donald Trump’s tax returns. Trump has resisted, taking his battles to federal courts in Washington and New York. And so the question of whether different parts of the government can see the president’s financial information is now playing out in two appeals courts and seems destined to make it to the U.S. Supreme Court. Add to that a Washington Post account of an IRS whistleblower claiming political interference in the handling of the president’s audit, and the result is what amounts to frenetic interest in one person’s tax returns.

ProPublica obtained the property tax documents using New York’s Freedom of Information Law. The documents were public because Trump appealed his property tax bill for the buildings every year for nine years in a row, the extent of the available records. We compared the tax records with loan records that became public when Trump’s lender, Ladder Capital, sold the debt on his properties as part of mortgage-backed securities.

ProPublica reviewed records for four properties: 40 Wall Street, the Trump International Hotel and Tower, 1290 Avenue of the Americas and Trump Tower. Discrepancies involving two of them — 40 Wall Street and the Trump International Hotel and Tower — stood out.

Trump’s personal attorney at the time, Michael Cohen, keeps watch as supporters lay hands on the then-presidential nominee. “It was my experience that Mr. Trump inflated his total assets when it served his purposes,” Cohen later testified, “and deflated his assets to reduce his real estate taxes.” (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)

There can be legitimate reasons for numbers to diverge between tax and loan documents, the experts noted, but some of the gaps seemed to have no reasonable justification. “It really feels like there’s two sets of books — it feels like a set of books for the tax guy and a set for the lender,” said Kevin Riordan, a financing expert and real estate professor at Montclair State University who reviewed the records. “It’s hard to argue numbers. That’s black and white.”

The Trump Organization did not respond on the record to detailed questions provided by ProPublica. Robert Pollack, a lawyer whose firm, Marcus & Pollack, handles Trump’s property tax appeal filings with the city, said he was not authorized to discuss the documents. A spokeswoman for Mazars USA, the accounting firm that signed off on the two properties’ expense and income statements, said the firm does not comment on its work for clients. Executives with Trump’s lender, Ladder Capital, declined to be quoted for the story.

In response to ProPublica’s questions about the disparities, Laura Feyer, deputy press secretary for New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, said of the Trump International Hotel and Tower, “The city is looking into this property, and if there has been any underreporting, we will take appropriate action.”

Taxes have long been a third rail for Trump. Long before he famously declined to make his personal returns public, a New York Times investigationconcluded, Trump participated in tax schemes that involved “outright fraud,” and that he had formulated “a strategy to undervalue his parents’ real estate holdings by hundreds of millions of dollars on tax returns.” Trump’s former partners in Panamaclaimed in a lawsuit, which is ongoing, that Trump’s hotel management company failed to pay taxes on millions in fees it received. Spokespeople for Trump and his company have denied any tax improprieties in the past.

In February, Cohen told Congress that Trump had adjusted figures up or down, as necessary, to obtain loans and avoid taxes. “It was my experience that Mr. Trump inflated his total assets when it served his purposes,” Cohen testified, “and deflated his assets to reduce his real estate taxes.”

The two Trump buildings with the most notable discrepancies shared a financial trait: Both were refinanced in 2015 and 2016 while Trump was campaigning for president. The loan for 40 Wall Street — $160 million — was then the Trump Organization’s biggest debt.

The fortunes of 40 Wall Street have risen and fallen repeatedly since it was constructed in 1930. Once briefly in the running to become the world’s tallest skyscraper (before being eclipsed by the Chrysler Building and then others), the 71-story landmark had an illustrious history before falling into disrepair as it changed hands multiple times.

Trump says in his book “Never Give Up” that he took over 40 Wall Street for $1 million during a down market in 1995. Others have reported the price as $10 million. Trump gave the property his signature treatment, decking out the lobby in Italian marble and bronze and christening it “The Trump Building.” Tenants such as American Express moved in.

But the rent rolls suffered when big-name tenants fled to Midtown in the years after the Sept. 11 attacks. Less blue-chip operations replaced them. In recent years, there were more setbacks. About two years ago, for example, high-end food purveyor Dean & Deluca canceled plans to locate an 18,500-square-foot emporium on the higher-priced first floor. The space remains empty.

The building at 40 Wall was underperforming, charging below-market rents, according to credit-rating agency Moody’s. Its profits were lagging.

Trump’s company, which has sometimes struggled to obtain credit because of his history of bankruptcies and defaults, turned for relief to a financial institution where Donald Trump had a connection: Ladder Capital, which employs Jack Weisselberg, the son of the Trump Organization’s longtime CFO, Allen Weisselberg. Ladder is a publicly traded commercial real estate investment trust that reports more than $6 billion in assets. In 2015, and still today, Jack Weisselberg was an executive director whose job was to make loans.

Trump and Jack Weisselberg had history together. Jack was at UBS, in its loan origination department, in 2006, when the Swiss bank loaned Trump $7 million for his piece of the Trump International Hotel and Tower. Allen Weisselberg had bought a condo from Trump in one of his buildings for a below-market price of $152,500 in 2000. He deeded it to Jack three years later for about $148,000. Jack sold the unit for more than three times as much in 2006. (Jack Weisselberg declined to comment on Ladder’s loans or his relationship with the Trump Organization.)

Even with a sympathetic lender, the struggles at 40 Wall Street would normally raise questions. Trump’s representatives needed to demonstrate signs of the building’s financial health if they wanted a new loan with a lower interest rate.

They had a compelling piece of data, it seemed. Trump’s team told Ladder that occupancy was rebounding after registering a lackluster 58.9% on Dec. 31, 2012. Since then, Trump representatives reported, the building had signed new tenants. Income from them hadn’t fully been realized yet, largely because of free-rent deals, they said. But after 2015, they predicted, revenues would surge.

“That’s a selling point for people in the business,” said Riordan, who was previously the executive director of the Rutgers Center for Real Estate. Borrowers “want to show tremendous leasing momentum.” The steepness of such a rise in occupancy at the Trump building was unusual, Riordan and other experts said.

Documents submitted to city property tax officials show no such run-up. Trump representatives reported to the tax authorities that the building was already 81% leased in 2012.

“What is bizarre is that you have these tax filings that are totally different,” Riordan said. A gap of at least 10 percentage points between the two occupancy reports persisted for the next two years, before the figures in the tax and loan reports synced in January 2016.

The portrayal of a rapid rise in occupancy, and the explanation that income would soon follow, were critical for the refinancing. Indeed, Ladder’s underwriters were predicting that 40 Wall Street’s profits would more than double after 2015. Having reviewed Trump’s financial statements and rent roll, they estimated the building would clear $22.6 million a year in net operating income.

Ladder needed credit ratings agencies like Moody’s and Fitch to endorse its income expectations and give the loan a favorable rating, which would in turn make it easier for the next step of the plan: to package the loan as part of a bond, a so-called commercial mortgage-backed security, and sell it to investors. Without the expected rise in income, Riordan said, the loan size or terms would likely have needed to be renegotiated to satisfy the ratings agencies and investors, which would mean less favorable terms for Trump and Ladder. “There was a story crafted here,” Riordan said. “It’s contradicted by what we see in the tax filings.”

Wallace, the University of California professor, added: “Especially in underwriting loans, you are supposed to truthfully report.” Both the lender and the borrower are required to supply accurate information, she said.

Moody’s and Fitch analysts found the underwriter’s projections slightly too rosy, but Fitch conferred an investment-grade rating on the loan, allowing it to proceed as planned. Trump ultimately received a 10-year loan with a lower interest rate than the building previously had as well as terms that would allow him to defer paying off much of the principal until the end of the loan.

Once granted, the loan to 40 Wall Street ran into trouble: The year after it went through, the loan servicer put it on a “watch list” because of concerns that the building wasn’t making sufficient profit to pay the debt service with enough of a margin. It stayed on the list for three months. (Trump’s company has continued making payments.)

As of 2018, the most recent year available, the building had never met the underwriters’ profit expectations, trailing by more than 8%, according to data from commercial real estate research service Trepp. Experts say that, given the amount of research underwriters do, a property typically meets their expectations fairly quickly.

The 40 Wall Street documents contain discrepancies related to costs as well as to occupancy. Generally, there are “more opportunities to play games on the expense side,” said Ron Shapiro, an assistant professor at Rutgers Business School and a former bank senior vice president, “particularly because there are many more kinds of expenses.”

Comparing specific expense items in both sets of records is challenging, because accountants may group categories differently in reports to tax and loan officials. But some differences on 40 Wall Street documents elicit head-scratching.

For example, insurance costs in 2017 were listed as $744,521 in tax documents and $457,414 in loan records.

Then there was the underlying lease. Trump technically doesn’t own 40 Wall Street. He pays the wealthy German family that owns the property for the right to rent the building to tenants. In 2015, both Trump’s report to tax authorities and a key loan disclosure document asserted that Trump’s company paid $1.65 million for these rights that year. But a line-by-line income and expense statement, which Trepp gathered from what the company reported to the loan servicer, reported the company paid about $1.24 million that year.

“I don’t know why that would be off,” said Jason Hoffman, who is chair of the real estate committee for a professional association of certified public accountants in New York state. Like other experts, he said there are legitimate reasons why tax and loan filings might not line up perfectly. But Hoffman said the firm where he works makes sure the numbers match when it prepares both tax and loan documents for a client — or that it can explain why if they don’t.

Financial information for the Trump International Hotel and Tower raises similar questions. Trump owns only a small portion of the building, which is located on Columbus Circle: two commercial spaces, which he rents out to a restaurant and a parking garage. Trump’s company told New York City tax officials it made about $822,000 renting space to commercial tenants there in 2017, records show. The company told loan officials it took in $1.67 million that year — more than twice as much. In eight years of data ProPublica examined for the Columbus Circle property, Trump’s company reported gross income to tax authorities that was typically only about 81% of what it reported to the lender.

Trump appeared to omit from tax documents income his company received from leasing space on the roof for television antennas, a ProPublica review found. The line on tax appeal forms for income from such communications equipment is blank on nine years of tax filings, even as loan documents listed the antennas as major sources of income.

Trump has an easement to lease the roof space; he doesn’t own it. But three tax experts, including Melanie Brock, an appraiser and paralegal who has worked on hundreds of New York City tax cases, told ProPublica that the income should still be reported on the tax appeals forms.

It’s hard to guess what might explain every inconsistency, said David Wilkes, a New York City tax lawyer who is chair of the National Association of Property Tax Attorneys. But, he added, “My gut reaction is it seems like there’s something amiss there.”

Tax records for Trump personally and for his business continue to be subjects of contention in multiple investigations. The Justice Department has intervened in the investigation by the Manhattan district attorney, whose office has sought Trump’s personal tax returns. Congressional lawmakers investigating his business dealings have sought documents from his longtime accountant, Donald Bender, a partner at Mazars. Trump is fighting the subpoenas in court. (Bender did not respond to requests for comment.)

Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., chairman of the House Oversight Committee, has said the committee is seeking to determine if Cohen’s testimony about Trump inflating and deflating his assets was accurate. Cummings asked for Mazars’ records related to Trump entities, as well as communications between Bender and Trump or Trump employees since 2009.

Such communications, the subpoena stated, should include any related to potential concerns that information Trump or his representatives provided his accountants was “incomplete, inaccurate, or otherwise unsatisfactory.”





Trump, Inc. at ProPublica
155 Ave of the Americas, 13th Floor
New York, NY 1001
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Re: Note to all billionaires especially those with holdings

Postby Meno_ » Fri Nov 08, 2019 1:30 am

Billionair's club running scared?

Recently Michael Bloomberg announced he may be running on the Democratic ticket against Trump, as Trump expressed a sexual to ' The Apprentice' as the 'Presidential Apprentice' after he leaves the White House.

Ahhhhhhh! Seriously?



Michael Bloomberg reportedly preparing for presidential run – live

Billionaire former New York mayor expected to file paperwork designating himself as a Democratic candidate next we

Bernie on Bloomberg: ‘The billionaire class is scared’

Like fellow progressive 2020 candidate Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders has responded to news the Michael Bloomberg may be entering the 2020 race with a bring-it-on attitude.

Sanders’ campaign manager Faiz Shakir also said, in a statement: “More billionaires seeking more political power surely isn’t the change America needs.”
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Re: Note to all billionaires especially those with holdings

Postby Meno_ » Sun Nov 10, 2019 6:55 pm

Can Bloomberg buy himself the presidency for 15 billion dollars?


There are dozens of Cambridge Analytica startups, egagernto get into the political business. Cambridge was getting ten million per interference, and as long as a buck remains to be made, entrepreneurs will sell their souls to jump into the frey. With increasing computational efficiency, the difference between political principal movements will reach the insignificant, defeating rhetoric in favor of the hermetic secondary process.

Signification is a synthetic form of identity politics, which may change into an extrinsic control vehicle.
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Re: Note to all billionaires especially those with holdings

Postby Meno_ » Wed Nov 13, 2019 12:12 am

Could Bloomberg become Perez in "20?

Yes. He could make a deal even Trump couldn't refuse.

He pays Trump 15 bil. For guarantee Trump not only be impeached , but convicted BY the senate.

No questions, or insurance required.

The only caveat: Bloomberg offers immunity for ALL charges against Trump, or, the charges may simply be dropped.
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