Black holes quasar

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Black holes quasar

Postby Artimas » Tue Jan 15, 2019 5:21 pm

So I was just thinking about black holes the other day and about how they suck up everything including light and when the black hole gets full of matter it converts that matter into pure energy called a quasar and burps it out. So I was thinking that if a black hole turns hard matter into pure energy/light that the black hole would be losing mass/weight due to its burping and conversion of energy.

So do black holes not actually grow, long term? Do they not have a stronger pull from sucking up planets or is that planet converted and spit out and the black hole keeps its normal force.

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Re: Black holes quasar

Postby Serendipper » Wed Jan 16, 2019 1:04 am

Artimas wrote:So I was just thinking about black holes the other day and about how they suck up everything including light and when the black hole gets full of matter it converts that matter into pure energy called a quasar and burps it out. So I was thinking that if a black hole turns hard matter into pure energy/light that the black hole would be losing mass/weight due to its burping and conversion of energy.

So do black holes not actually grow, long term? Do they not have a stronger pull from sucking up planets or is that planet converted and spit out and the black hole keeps its normal force.

It's true that black holes suck in matter, but far more of the matter in the vicinity is accelerated around and is simply flung out rather than being sucked into the event horizon, so I think of them more as tornadoes than vacuum cleaners. The light from a quasar is more likely from the matter swirling around the black hole than emanating from the black hole itself.

Black holes radiate Hawking Radiation https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawking_radiation and are expected to evaporate eventually.

Matter is energy. I think of matter as energy with a bit more energy :) E=mc^2 and E=hf, so m=hf/c^2 and we see that mass is a function of frequency and 2 constants. h is Planck's constant and c is the speed of light, which is thought to be constant in a vacuum (vacuum defined as the absence of anything with charge).
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Re: Black holes quasar

Postby Artimas » Wed Jan 16, 2019 6:51 am

Serendipper wrote:
Artimas wrote:So I was just thinking about black holes the other day and about how they suck up everything including light and when the black hole gets full of matter it converts that matter into pure energy called a quasar and burps it out. So I was thinking that if a black hole turns hard matter into pure energy/light that the black hole would be losing mass/weight due to its burping and conversion of energy.

So do black holes not actually grow, long term? Do they not have a stronger pull from sucking up planets or is that planet converted and spit out and the black hole keeps its normal force.

It's true that black holes suck in matter, but far more of the matter in the vicinity is accelerated around and is simply flung out rather than being sucked into the event horizon, so I think of them more as tornadoes than vacuum cleaners. The light from a quasar is more likely from the matter swirling around the black hole than emanating from the black hole itself.

Black holes radiate Hawking Radiation https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawking_radiation and are expected to evaporate eventually.

Matter is energy. I think of matter as energy with a bit more energy :) E=mc^2 and E=hf, so m=hf/c^2 and we see that mass is a function of frequency and 2 constants. h is Planck's constant and c is the speed of light, which is thought to be constant in a vacuum (vacuum defined as the absence of anything with charge).


Thanks for the response and clearing things up for me. It's all very interesting.

A "god" who deserves worship will be humble enough to reject it; A "god" who demands worship will not be worthy of it.

All smoke fades, as do all delicate mirrors shatter.

"My ancestors are smiling on me, Imperials. Can you say the same?"

"Science Fiction today ~ Science Fact tomorrow"

Change is inevitable, it can only be delayed or sped up. Choose wisely.

Truth is pain, and pain is gain.


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Artimas
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Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2014 12:47 pm
Location: Earth, Milky Way

Re: Black holes quasar

Postby Serendipper » Wed Jan 16, 2019 7:17 am

Artimas wrote:Thanks for the response and clearing things up for me. It's all very interesting.

You're welcome and I agree! :)
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