Trump enters the stage

Discussion of the recent unfolding of history.

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Fri Mar 01, 2019 5:10 pm

TRUMP EFFECT
Trump learns the limits of personal power, at home and beyond
Analysis: It may have been one of the worst weeks of Trump's presidency, concentrated in just a few harrowing days.

President Donald Trump boards Air Force One after his summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Hanoi, Vietnam, on Feb. 28, 2019.Leah Millis / Reuters
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March 1, 2019, 6:10 AM ET
By Jonathan Allen
HANOI, Vietnam — President Donald Trump touched down in Washington a few hours ago having endured a brutal stretch overseas in which the limits of his power at home and abroad, and the perils of his personal conduct, were revealed all at once and in humiliating fashion.

Here in Southeast Asia, half a world away from home, Trump behaved solicitously toward a notorious dictator before backing away from what even his staunchest allies saw as a potentially calamitous nuclear deal only at the last minute, leaving himself no obvious path forward for an elusive goal — bringing North Korea back into the community of nations — that has been a central piece of his foreign policy agenda.


"High-level diplomacy can carry high-level risks," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said in a nod to the breakdown in negotiations, "but the president is to be commended for walking away when it became clear insufficient progress had been made on de-nuclearization."

Back home, Trump's former personal lawyer and fixer, Michael Cohen, was laying out a narrative of Trump as the consummate "con man," while fellow Republicans declined to defend the president's behavior, began to distance themselves more clearly from his effort to use executive authority to build a border wall and cheered his failure to strike a deal with Kim.

It may have been one of the worst weeks of Trump's presidency, concentrated in just a few harrowing days.

On Wednesday, in compelling congressional testimony, Cohen portrayed the president as a businessman who played fast and loose with tax laws, his charity's money and payments to contractors, and as a candidate who had little regard for the law in directing Cohen to provide hush money to cover up alleged marital infidelity, pursuing a real estate development in Moscow during the 2016 election and discussing the benefits of WikiLeaks releasing stolen Democratic National Committee emails to help his fortunes.


The public session brought signs Trump was losing some steam — albeit at the margins — with his cheering section: fellow Republicans in Congress.

Rather than defend Trump, House Republicans on the Oversight and Reform Committee chose to attack Cohen's character — a tacit acknowledgment that protecting the president's reputation was a more difficult charge.

And while the dam has hardly broken, Trump is seeing more cracks in the coalition of Republicans willing to support the national emergency he declared to fund a border wall without congressional consent.

On Thursday, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., took to the Senate floor to offer an admonition to Trump, asking him to reconsider the move.


"There has never been an instance where a president of the United States has asked for funding, Congress refused it and the president then has used the National Emergency Act to justify the funding anyway," Alexander said.

Alexander stopped short of saying he would vote for a House-passed resolution terminating the emergency declaration, but he escalated the pressure on Trump from within his own party to abandon his plan to execute an end-run around Congress, with the effort to nullify his emergency declaration now potentially just one GOP vote away from approval. On Tuesday, with Trump in Vietnam, 13 House Republicans voted with a unified House Democratic Caucus to cancel the emergency.

Ron Bonjean, a former Republican congressional leadership aide and a partner at the firm Rokk Solutions, said the resistance to Trump within the GOP won't get worse if he retains the backing of the party's core voters.

"He’s actually getting rather light Senate Republican pushback on the emergency declaration compared to what it could be at this moment by circumventing Congress," Bonjean said. "As long as the base stays with the president, most Republicans are not breaking from Trump for fear of facing a primary challenge back home."


Bonjean added that while many Republicans weren't sure what to make of the Kim summit at the outset, "walking away from Hanoi early was considered a smart thing to do for the country and he deserves the praise for not reaching for a deal that wasn't there to be made."

Not only was Trump, the leader of the free world, unable to bend Kim, the tin pot dictator of one of the world's last remaining "rogue" nations, to his will, Kim left the deal-seeking Trump walking away from the altar amid a dispute between the two countries over just what was in dispute.

To add intellectual insult to injured American pride, Trump said that he believed North Korea's Kim Jong Un's claim not to have known anything about the treatment of Otto Warmbier, an American who died shortly after returning home from more than a year in captivity in North Korea — an assertion of ignorance that former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Bill Richardson said was "totally impossible."

Former Vice President Joe Biden, who served for many years as the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said Thursday that he hopes the summit debacle was a teaching moment for Trump.

"I hope I don't come across as condescending, because I don't mean it," Biden, who is considering a run for president in 2020, said. "I hope the president has learned a really important lesson: Diplomacy matters, preparation matters."

Another thing Trump learned for sure: Spending a few days on the road can't keep you from enduring a truly terrible week in Washington, too.

Jonathan Allen
Jonathan Allen is a Washington-based national political reporter for NBC News who focuses on the president
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Re: Trump enters the stage- getting steamy

Postby Meno_ » Sat Mar 02, 2019 12:12 am

Boy , this what has attained the dimension of a saga, with twists and turns of already epic proportions, gearing up to a great nest seller , with millions at stake in possible profits, this is the latest flabbergasting page Turner to befuddle an already complex plot:




Trump's 'love letter' book claim the latest attack on Michael Cohen after testimony
MICHAEL COLLINS AND WILLIAM CUMMINGS AND SEAN ROSSMAN | USA TODAY | 55 minutes ago


Michael Cohen testified in front of the House Oversight and Reform Committee on Wednesday. Cohen called Trump a 'conman,' a 'cheat,' and 'fundamentally disloyal.'
USA TODAY
President Donald Trump accused his former personal attorney Michael Cohen of previously pushing a book about his administration that contradicted the scathing testimony Cohen delivered before a House committee about his former boss on Wednesday.


It was the latest in a string of attacks on Cohen, who said the president directed him to lie to Congress while tying him to several criminal investigations that have shadowed his presidency.

In a series of posts on Twitter Friday morning, Trump called the manuscript a "love letter to Trump."

"Wow, just revealed that Michael Cohen wrote a 'love letter to Trump' manuscript for a new book that he was pushing," the president tweeted. "Written and submitted long after Charlottesville and Helsinki, his phony reasons for going rogue. Book is exact opposite of his fake testimony, which now is a lie!"


In another tweet, Trump said the manuscript was submitted to publishers "a short time ago" and called on Congress to demand a copy.

Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's former lawyer, speaks briefly to the media as he leaves a closed-door hearing of the House Intelligence Committee accompanied by his lawyer, Michael Monico, of Chicago, Thursday, Feb. 28, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's former lawyer, speaks briefly to the media as he leaves a closed-door hearing of the House Intelligence Committee accompanied by his lawyer, Michael Monico, of Chicago, Thursday, Feb. 28, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington.
JACQUELYN MARTIN, AP
"Your heads will spin when you see the lies, misrepresentations and contradictions against his Thursday testimony," he wrote. "Like a different person! He is totally discredited!"

Cohen acknowledged during his testimony before a House committee on Wednesday that he had been approached with offers for a movie and book deal. Under questioning by Republican lawmakers, he refused to say he would not continue to pursue such a deal in the future.

The proposed book Trump was referring to in his tweets is apparently the same manuscript that Cohen shopped around to several publishers last year.


The book, which was to be called "Trump Revolution: From the Tower to the White House, Understanding Donald J. Trump," promised a candid but mostly flattering look at Trump through the eyes of his longtime attorney and professional "fixer," according to multiple published reports.

Cohen testimony: Donald Trump slams Michael Cohen testimony as 'shameful,' accuses him of lying

Michael Cohen's testimony prompts a new: In web of Trump investigations, is anyone safe?

Cohen reportedly even reached an agreement with Hachette Book Group's Center Street subsidiary to publish the memoir, but the deal fell apart after word got out that he was under investigation by federal authorities and the FBI had raided his law office.

The Daily Mail of London reported Thursday it had reviewed a copy of the proposal and that Cohen had nothing but good things to say about Trump in it.

Cohen conceded Trump could be "an exceedingly tough boss," according to the publication, but he rejected unflattering characterizations that Trump is crazy and dumb, paranoid, in over his head and a TV-addicted liar who hates the media.



Michael Cohen testifies before Congress about President Donald Trump
"All of these things have been said about my longtime boss, Donald J. Trump," Cohen wrote, according to the Daily Mail. "None of it is true. Except maybe that last one – about the media. Trump does believe that reporters are out to get him, and for a very good reason. Many of them are."

Cohen also promised chapters on first lady Melania Trump and Trump’s children, as well as his role in arranging hush-money payments to Stormy Daniels, a stripper and adult-film actress who says she had a sexual encounter with Trump, the paper said.

Lanny J. Davis, an attorney for Cohen, issued a statement Friday saying Cohen decided in 2018 against taking a "substantial advance" for a book proposal.

“In other words, POTUS has yet lied again...but what’s the difference between 9000 or 9001 lies?” the statement reads.


Cohen: Michael Cohen, President Trump's former lawyer, ends 3 days of 'excruciating' testimony with another scheduled

Cohen hearing: Lynne Patton pushes back at Rep. Tlaib's 'prop' label, defends appearance at Cohen hearing

The book came up at Wednesday's hearing, in which Cohen called his ex-boss a con man and a cheat.

Rep. Carol Miller, R-W.V., asked Cohen: "Isn’t it true you tried to sell a book about your time with President Trump entitled 'Trump Revolution: From the Tower to the White House, Understanding Donald J. Trump?'"


"Yes, that happened," said Cohen, who disclosed he was offered close to $750,000 for the book, but turned it down.

The focus on the apparent contradictions between Cohen's testimony and the reported contents of his manuscript is the latest salvo from Trump and his supporters in their campaign to discredit Cohen and minimize the damage from his testimony.

Trump last referred to Cohen as his attorney in April before hiring Rudy Giuliani, who as recently as May referred to Cohen as "an honest, honorable lawyer." But after it became clear that Cohen was cooperating with special counsel Robert Mueller in the wake of the FBI raid, Trump's team began the assault on Cohen's credibility.

Those attacks ratcheted up after Democrats gained control of the House in the 2018 midterm election and it began to appear likely that Cohen would be asked to testify in a public hearing.


Gaetz: Rep. Matt Gaetz says he personally apologized to Michael Cohen after tweeting apparent threat

'A baseless criminal referral': Republicans accuse Michael Cohen of perjury in letter to AG

After Cohen pleaded guilty to lying about efforts to build Trump Tower Moscow, the president said Cohen was a "weak person" who was "lying" to "get a reduced sentence."

By December Giuliani was calling Cohen "pathetic" and a "serial liar." That same week, Trump called his former attorney a "rat" in a tweet, borrowing an expression from movie mobsters for someone who agrees to cooperate with law enforcement.

From Trump fixer to flipper:Timeline of Michael Cohen's role in Russia probe

Remember, Michael Cohen only became a “Rat” after the FBI did something which was absolutely unthinkable & unheard of until the Witch Hunt was illegally started. They BROKE INTO AN ATTORNEY’S OFFICE! Why didn’t they break into the DNC to get the Server, or Crooked’s office?

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 16, 2018
On the eve of Cohen's testimony, Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Florida, posted a tweet that appeared to threaten Cohen with the potential disclosure of damaging personal information. Gaetz deleted the tweet and said he apologized to Cohen, but concerns that he was trying to intimidate a witness have prompted a House ethics complaint and an inquiry by the Florida Bar.


During the hearing on Wednesday, Republicans on the House Oversight and Reform Committee repeatedly went after Cohen's credibility, arguing that lawmakers should not trust the word of a man who was just convicted of lying to Congress.

"You're a pathological liar. You don't know truth from falsehood," Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., told Cohen. Gosar said it was important to remember "the old adage that our moms taught us" and pointed to a poster with Cohen's face and the words "Liar, liar pants on fire."

"No one should ever listen to you and give you credibility. It's sad," Gosar said.

Plaskett: Stacey Plaskett has had enough of Jim Jordan. Her 'eye roll' says it all

After the hearing, Reps. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, and Mark Meadows, R-N.C., accused Cohen of lying during his testimony. The two staunch Trump supporters detailed their allegations in a 30-page letter to Attorney General William Barr outlining a number of Cohen's comments they claim to be lies. Jordan, the top Republican on the committee, and Meadows asked that Cohen be investigated for perjury and making false statements.

"His testimony included intentionally false statements designed to make himself look better on a national stage," they wrote.


Lanny Davis, an attorney for Cohen, said in a statement that the partisan referral was a "sad misuse of the criminal justice system."

"Mr. Cohen testified truthfully before the House Oversight Committee. He took full responsibility for his guilty pleas," Davis said.

Contributing: Christal Hayes

Originally Published 4 hours ago
Updated 54 minutes ago






© Copyright Gannett 2019


This is very lame, since any employee who values an employer's trust , will play up to him with kindness and positivity.

However again, it doesent take extreme politocal insight to find a reversal where that employer tries to use that employee in a negative way, detrimental to his well being, and ultimately abandoning him when pushed to a corner.

I think some of these ironclad but manageable geniuses , instead of degrading the public intelligence of sentiment, should take a survey of possible reactions to untried rhetoric.

I think both men are in a corner, and the sad part, of playing ill suited roles they were enticed for, did not correctly match their supposed qualifications.

That Cohen was a lawyer, shows a weakness to subscribe unto a misgivings agenda, not to mention proper lack of platform.

More and more, the qualifying issue of the lack of legal sophistication on Trump's part , in addition to proper political acumen, is becoming increasingly an Achilles heel for him.

The scenario of entities, organizations or personages owning him is turning into a likely visible scenario.
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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Sun Mar 03, 2019 4:57 pm

In Hanoi and at home, the Trump show flops
By Pat Wiedenkeller, CNN
Updated 9:31 AM EST, Sun March 03, 2019




(CNN) What a big double bill it was -- President Donald Trump taking the world stage for a nuclear summit with Kim Jong Un of North Korea, just as his former fixer-lawyer, Michael Cohen, was appearing before a Congressional committee for a one-man revue about schemes, lies and porn-star payoffs.

Two shows, same theme, wrote Frida Ghitis: a President exposed. "A clear portrait of a morally hollow presidency."

"Cohen described a man devoid of principles and determined to win in pursuit of money, power and prestige," Ghitis said. "And, in Hanoi, we saw the risks of having such a man as President."

She was referring, in part, to Trump's "shameful" betrayal of an American citizen, Otto Warmbier, when Trump told the world that he accepted the dictator's word that Kim didn't know North Korea had fatally tortured Warmbier. "Trump has a well-established affinity for dictators, and he's known for taking their word over that of his own experts," she noted, citing his absolutions of Vladimir Putin and Mohammed bin Salman.

No deal
Dealmaker Trump left Vietnam empty-handed. But Nathan Park insisted it's Kim Jong Un who should be feeling the pressure now. "Trump and his unconventional approach to diplomacy represented the best chance for North Korea to win any concession from the United States." And the explosive allegations on Capitol Hill ("an administration beginning to teeter," wrote Nicholas Kristof in the New York Times) could mean that Kim doesn't have much time.

Trump might have felt sunnier about things earlier in the week when he tweeted about a Fourth of July bash he was planning at the Lincoln Memorial, featuring an "address by your favorite President, me!" But Dean Obeidallah wondered: "Perhaps, come July 4th, Trump wants the American people to show him the same 'love' and 'great fervor, as Trump put it, that North Koreans have for Kim?!"

Mother tongue
Reyna Grande arrived in the U.S. from Mexico speaking not a word of English. On the first day of school, "my 5th-grade teacher pointed to the farthest corner of her classroom and sent me there. She ignored me for the rest of the year." Grande and her siblings soon became English dominant, rejecting their mother as "a symbol of what we didn't want to be -- a working-class, uneducated, non-English-speaking immigrant."

Grande later regretted what she did. And it bothered her for years, until she had children of her own and did something about it. Hers is a moving and thought-provoking story. Read it and tell us your own stories of speaking a different language in America.

Ted Turner: Protect this land we love
CNN founder Ted Turner was joyful over Tuesday's House passage of a sweeping public lands and conservation bill, but added, "there is much left to be done." "I urge all of us who care about this beautiful country, whether it be because you like to hunt, fish, hike, swim, paddle, watch wildlife, farm, or ranch, to look for those ways that we can connect with each other, and together, protect and steward this land that we all love."

'Liar, liar?'
Elijah Cummings, Democrat and chairman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee, said lawmakers questioning Michael Cohen Wednesday were after the truth, which the witness insisted he was providing about Donald Trump. "He is a racist, he is a con man, and he is a cheat," said Cohen, who is facing prison time for lying to Congress earlier.

"Liar, liar, pants on fire," said Arizona Republican, Paul Gosar. For real.

Republicans certainly stuck to their "partisan food fight," David Axelrod noted. But "listening to Cohen today describe the tasks Trump assigned to him, it occurred to me that lying was an essential demand of the job," he wrote. "Who do you assign such tasks? A Boy Scout? A nun?"

Republicans have a point, wrote Scott Jennings: "if you lie to Congress once, why are you allowed to come back and try again?" His advice: "Ignore Cohen's petty personal asides. Ignore the partisan Democrats bloviations. And wait for a reliable narrator — Robert Mueller — to give us the truth."

Not really, wrote Holman W. Jenkins, in the Wall Street Journal: "the Mueller report will settle nothing." And when the elite media allows the extent to which the FBI meddled in the 2016 presidential race to surface, he maintained, Trump will get reelected.

If he doesn't? Cohen struck an ominous note as the hearing ended. He said he feared that if Trump loses re-election, "there will never be a peaceful transition of power." It was a thought that echoed former Obama administration official, Joshua Geltzer, writing for CNN days earlier—and the reason that "four key sets of governmental actors across the United States" should commit now to steps to thwart Trump if he refuses to step down.

More good reads on the hearing:

Andrea Gonzalez-Ramirez, in Refinery 29: The Freshman Congresswomen Did Their Damn Job At Cohen's Hearing

Michael D'Antonio: I was one of the 500 people Michael Cohen threatened.

Privileged men, poor women
Three powerful men made headlines for sickening reasons last week. New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft and ex-hedge fund manager Jeffrey Epstein--were linked to separate sex-trafficking investigations, and rapper R. Kelly was charged with criminal sexual abuse. (Kraft says he is innocent and pleaded not guilty to soliciting prostitution, Epstein got his plea deal in 2008 and R. Kelly denies the allegations.)

What do the accusations have in common? "The systematic exploitation of young girls and women who often are poor, vulnerable, ignored and silenced," wrote Roxanne Jones. "Each of these cases points to a disturbing story of just how easily justice is denied to certain women in America, and how invisible these women remain -- often in their own communities -- despite all the high-profile marches and equality movements."

Raul Reyes wrote that Trump's Labor Secretary, Alexander Acosta, needs to resign: he was the Miami US Attorney who cut the deal--kept hidden from Epstein's victims-- that let Epstein dodge a life sentence. Epstein served just 13 months in the private wing of the Palm Beach County jail. A federal judge recently ruled federal prosecutors broke the law on Acosta's watch. Acosta's betrayal is "worthy of bipartisan outrage and should offend every American father and mother," Reyes wrote.

Bernie Sanders has a problem
CNN's town hall with Senator Bernie Sanders on Monday night showed him picking up where he left off in 2016, Errol Louis wrote. But his talking points about income inequality, health care, education and corporate greed—are now Democratic boilerplate. "It's not that Bernie went centrist; instead, the center moved toward him." Can he persuade voters he's the best salesman for ideas now copied by others?

And those Democratic ideas—like the Green New Deal and Medicare for all-- cost money, wrote libertarian economist Jeffrey Miron and Laura Nicolae. With huge debt levels, "restoring fiscal sanity in the United States requires significant cuts to federal entitlement spending."

On Friday, Washington's Gov. Jay Inslee became the 13th Democrat to throw a hat in the ring for 2020. Noting the huge Democratic presidential field, along with the 14 candidates who ran in Tuesday's mayoral election in Chicago and the 17 who vied for public advocate in New York, Jill Filipovic saw encouraging signs of America's "move away from political apathy"

2019's jaw-dropping Black History Month
February, a month ordinarily devoted to celebration and reflection on black history, this time delivered a "dizzying national reckoning" on racial reality, wrote historian Peniel Joseph: "Politicians in blackface, a white actor who confessed to murderous racist impulses, a black actor who," authorities say "faked his own hate crime, films about race touching off a firestorm at the Oscars and white fragility about confronting racism unfolding in real-time in the House of Representatives during the Michael Cohen hearing."

That last comment referred to Republican Rep. Mark Meadows asking HUD official Lynne Patton to stand behind him during the Cohen hearing to somehow prove that Trump is no racist. Rep. Rashida Tlaib rebuked him for using a black woman as a prop. Meadows' indignant self-defense, wrote Kashana Cauley in the New York Times, might have been more convincing if not for his repeated comments in 2012 about sending President Obama "back home to Kenya." Tlaib apologized, but she got it right the first time, Cauley said. (It was left to Rep. Elijah Cummings to calm the waters after the flare up, a rare moment of "civility and grace in Washington," noted Jen Psaki.)
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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Sun Mar 03, 2019 8:55 pm

POLITICO

Warner: ‘Enormous amounts of evidence’ of possible Russia collusion
By KELSEY TAMBORRINO

03/03/2019 12:24 PM EST

Mark Warner
Sen. Mark Warner said he’d never seen “this much outreach to a foreign country“ as there was on the Trump 2016 campaign. | AP Photo/Alex Brandon

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The top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee said Sunday lawmakers have found "enormous amounts of evidence" into potential collusion between the presidential campaign of Donald Trump and the Russians during the 2016 election.

Mark Warner of Virginia made his remarks in response to an assertion that there is "no factual evidence of collusion" from the Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.), who is chairman of the Intelligence Committee.



As evidence, Warner cited on NBC's "Meet the Press" ongoing negotiations about Trump Tower and the dump of WikiLeaks material.

"Where that evidence leads, in terms of a conclusion ... I'm going to reserve judgment, until I'm finished," Warner said.

But he added: "There's no one that could factually say there's not plenty of evidence of collaboration or communications between Trump Organization and Russians."

CPAC

Trump delivers scorched-earth speech as he tries to regain footing
By ANDREW RESTUCCIA
Warner's House Intelligence Committee counterpart, Adam Schiff, said Sunday on CBS‘ "Face the Nation" that there's both "direct evidence" and "abundant circumstantial evidence" of collusion with Russia.

The California Democrat said "there is direct evidence" in emails from the Russians offering dirt on Hillary Clinton in what is described as the "Russian government effort to help elect Donald Trump."

"They offer that dirt. There is an acceptance of that offer in writing from the president's son, Don Jr., and there is overt acts in furtherance of that," Schiff said. "That is the meeting at Trump Tower and all the lies to cover up that meeting at the Trump Tower, and apparently lies that the president participated in."

Asked Sunday by NBC host Chuck Todd whether a Russia conspiracy without any actual evidence of a crime being committed could lead to impeachment of the president, Warner again said he would wait to reach his conclusion but qualified his statement by looking at history.

"I have never, in my lifetime, seen a presidential campaign, from a person of either party, have this much outreach to a foreign country and a foreign country that the intelligence community, and our committee has validated, intervened, massively, in our election and intervened with an attempt to help one candidate, Donald Trump, and to hurt another candidate, Hillary Clinton," he said.

Story Continued Below

Warner also said that some of the "key people" the Senate committee wants to talk to are "caught up" in the Mueller criminal investigations.

"Those criminal investigations need to conclude, before we get a chance to talk to them," he said.

For his part, Trump has continued to call any and all suggestions of collusion to be part of a witch hunt against him. On Sunday, he tweeted: “I am an innocent man being persecuted by some very bad, conflicted & corrupt people in a Witch Hunt that is illegal & should never have been allowed to start.

This story tagged under:
Mark Warner Russia Donald Trump Donald Trump 2020 Adam Schiff
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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Mon Mar 04, 2019 3:21 pm

House Judiciary Chair Jerry Nadler says it's 'clear' Trump obstructed justice, plans 'abuse of power' probe
WILLIAM CUMMINGS | USA TODAY | 20 minutes ago

Corrections and clarifications: A previous version of this story incorrectly identified the Trump Organization's chief financial officer.


House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler on Sunday stepped up his rhetoric about potential criminal wrongdoing by President Donald Trump and said he plans to request documents from more than 60 people linked to the president.

Nadler, D-N.Y., said during an interview on ABC's "This Week" that congressional Republicans "spent two years shielding the president from any proper accountability."

"It’s our job to protect the rule of law. That’s our core function. And to do that we are going to initiate investigations into abuses of power, into corruption and into obstruction of justice," Nadler said.


On Monday the House Judiciary Committee plans to issue document requests from over 60 people connected to the White House and the Trump Organization, he said. Among those individuals are the president's oldest son, Donald Trump Jr., and Allen Weisselberg, the chief financial officer for the Trump Organization. Nadler expected that the full list of names would be made public on Monday.

"It’s very clear that the president obstructed justice," Nadler said, citing Trump's frequent attacks on special counsel Robert Mueller; his alleged request that the FBI go easy on former national security adviser Michael Flynn; and his admission that one reason he fired FBI director James Comey was to stop "the Russian thing."

"The White House seems to have used its power for personal enrichment in violation of the emoluments clause of the Constitution," Nadler said. If the reports are true that Trump ordered his son-in-law Jared Kushner to be given a top-secret security clearance over the objections of the White House counsel and his intelligence advisers, that would constitute another abuse of power, he said.

But the congressman cautioned that "impeachment is a long way down the road."

"We don’t have the facts yet, but we’re going to initiate proper investigations," he said. "Before you impeach somebody, you have to persuade the American public that it ought to happen."


Nadler said that crimes and impeachable offenses are "two different things."

Robert Mueller investigation: Key players in 2016 election probe

In response to Nadler's comments, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy. R-Calif., said Sunday on "This Week" that he believes "Congressman Nadler decided to impeach the president the day the president won the election."

McCarthy said "there's nothing that the president did wrong," and he accused Nadler of starting fresh investigations because he does not believe Mueller will conclude there was collusion between Russians and the Trump campaign.

On Sunday, Trump tweeted, "After more than two years of Presidential Harassment, the only things that have been proven is that Democrats and other broke the law." He did not elaborate on what crimes he believes Democrats had committed.

"I am an innocent man being persecuted by some very bad, conflicted & corrupt people in a Witch Hunt that is illegal & should never have been allowed to start - And only because I won the Election! Despite this, great success!" the president said.


After more than two years of Presidential Harassment, the only things that have been proven is that Democrats and other broke the law. The hostile Cohen testimony, given by a liar to reduce his prison time, proved no Collusion! His just written book manuscript showed what he.....

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) March 3, 2019
...said was a total lie, but Fake Media won’t show it. I am an innocent man being persecuted by some very bad, conflicted & corrupt people in a Witch Hunt that is illegal & should never have been allowed to start - And only because I won the Election! Despite this, great success!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) March 3, 2019
Trump also repeated an argument he first made last week that testimony from his former attorney Michael Cohen before the House Oversight and Reform Committee was contradicted by a book manuscript he had written before the FBI raided his home, hotel room and offices in April 2018.

In his testimony, Cohen called Trump a "racist" a "liar" and a "cheat." But the manuscript for the book, which was to be called "Trump Revolution: From the Tower to the White House, Understanding Donald J. Trump," painted a largely flattering portrayal of Trump, according to multiple published reports.

Trump's 'love letter' book claim: The latest attack on Michael Cohen after testimony

Cohen's testimony prompts new question: In web of Trump investigations, is anyone safe?

When asked about Cohen's testimony, Nadler said Trump's former fixer "directly implicated" the president in "various crimes."

He said the "major one" was the campaign finance violation Cohen pleaded guilty to that involved paying an adult film star weeks ahead of the 2016 election to remain silent about an alleged past affair with Trump. Cohen claims the president directed him to make the payment.


"Seeking to sabotage a fair election would be an impeachable offense," Nadler said Sunday.

McCarthy said the payment was a "personal issue."

"If it’s a finance campaign, those are fines," McCarthy said, despite the fact that the violation to which Cohen pleaded guilty was a felony. "Those aren’t impeachable."

McCarthy also pushed back at the notion that Trump's granting of a security clearance to Kushner was an abuse of power.

"The president has the legal authority to do it," McCarthy said.

During an interview on CNN's "State of the Union," Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., said Cohen had a "checkered past" and "an ax to grind."

Kennedy said that he would rely on Mueller's conclusions regarding any potentially illegal acts by the president.

'Shameful': Donald Trump slams Michael Cohen testimony, accuses him of lying

More: Michael Cohen testimony's biggest bombshells

Sen. Mark Warner, the ranking member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, also took a wait-and-see approach Sunday on "State of the Union," although he said that he believes there is "lots of evidence" that the Trump campaign conspired with Russia to influence the 2016 election.

The Virginia Democrat cited Cohen's testimony that Trump deceived the public during the campaign about his efforts to build a Trump Tower in Moscow; that Roger Stone told him in advance about WikiLeaks publication of stolen emails; and that Trump knew about Trump Jr.'s meeting with Russians offering "dirt" on Hillary Clinton.

"Anyone that says there's no evidence of collaboration, there's plenty of evidence," Warner said. "The question is, what kind of full conclusion do we reach? And I'm going to reserve my judgment on that conclusion until we finish our investigation."

The chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said on "This Week" that Democrats also plan to investigate "allegations that the Russians have been laundering money through the Trump Organization." If true, Schiff said that would constitute "a profound compromise of this president."

But Schiff also planned to wait on the Mueller report.

"While there is abundant evidence of collusion, the issue from a criminal point of view is whether there is proof beyond a reasonable doubt of a criminal conspiracy. And that is something that we will have to await Bob Mueller’s report and the underlying evidence to determine," he said.

More: Robert Mueller has spent two years investigating Trump, and he hasn't said a word. It's possible he never will.



© Copyright Gannett 2019
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Re: Trump enters the stage docs request Mueller nearly ready

Postby Meno_ » Tue Mar 05, 2019 12:34 am

RUSSIA INVESTIGATION
House Democrats demand documents on Trump-Putin talks
The Washington Post reported in January that Trump personally intervened to hide details of a meeting with the Russian president.

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., speaks to reporters at the Capitol on Jan. 17, 2019.Alex Wong / Getty Images
SHARE THIS —
March 4, 2019, 3:12 PM ET
By Allan Smith
The Democratic chairmen of three key House committees on Monday requested a trove of documents from the White House and State Department on President Donald Trump's meetings and phone calls with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

The chairmen — Reps. Adam Schiff of California, Elijah Cummings of Maryland, and Eliot Engel of New York — are also asking that the translators present for the meetings and calls be made available for interviews with their committees. The three lawmakers respectively chair the House Intelligence, Oversight, and Foreign Affairs panels.


Their letter follows another to the White House last month in which they sought answers to several questions about the records of Trump's communications with Putin. The White House did not respond by the given due date of last Friday.

The chairmen wrote to acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo that they are now expanding their investigation and asking for more documents and interviews to assist in their examination of the meetings and calls. The Democrats wrote that they want to know how the communications have affected U.S. foreign policy and whether the president or his administration have tried to conceal records of talks between the two leaders, in violation of federal law.

"According to media reports, President Trump, on multiple occasions, appears to have taken steps to conceal the details of his communications with President Putin from other administration officials, Congress, and the American people," the chairmen wrote. "The President reportedly seized notes pertaining to at least one meeting held with President Putin and directed at least one American interpreter not to discuss the substance of communications with President Putin with other federal officials."

"These allegations, if true, raise profound national security, counterintelligence, and foreign policy concerns, especially in light of Russia’s ongoing active measures campaign to improperly influence American elections," they added.


In January, The Washington Post reported that Trump personally intervened to hide details of meetings with the Russian president, such a sit-down between the two leaders in Hamburg, Germany, in 2017. The Post reported that Trump went to "extraordinary lengths" to keep conversations with Putin under wraps, with current and former U.S. officials telling the publication that in Hamburg, Trump went as far as confiscating notes from his interpreter and barring the interpreter from discussing details of the meeting with other administration officials.

In another high-profile instance, Trump didn't allow Cabinet officials or any aides into the room during a two-hour conversation with Putin during their summit in Helsinki, Finland, last summer. Only a translator were present, and several officials have since said they were never able to get a reliable readout of the meeting, the Post reported.

Trump told Fox News host Jeanine Pirro in January that he was not "keeping anything under wraps" and he "couldn't care less" about transcripts of the interview being made public.

"Anybody could have listened to that meeting," he said of the Helsinki meeting. "That meeting is up for grabs."


Democrats voiced a much different view of the matter.

"When he takes the interpreter's notes and wants to destroy them so no one can see what was said in written transcript, you know it raises serious questions about the relationship between this president and Putin," Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., told ABC's "This Week" in January.

The chairmen's request comes hours after House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., made a request for documents from more than 80 people or entities connected to the president as part of that committee's Trump investigation.

“I cooperate all the time with everybody,” Trump said Monday in response to Nadler's request, adding, "You know, beautiful thing, no collusion. It’s a total hoax."


Allan Smith is a political reporter for NBC News
© 2019 NBC UNIVERSAL


Next: rebuke from Trump's own party:





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Donald Trump's emergency order hits wall with GOP senators. What's next?
DEBORAH BARFIELD BERRY AND MICHAEL COLLINS | USA TODAY | 1 hour ago


Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski says she will vote to terminate President Donald Trump's emergency declaration on border security. (Feb. 26)
AP
WASHINGTON – Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has made it clear to President Donald Trump that he has a choice: Move ahead with his declaration of a national emergency at the southern border and face a potential rebuke from his own party – or shift gears.


McConnell acknowledged Monday the Senate is likely to pass a resolution to block Trump’s emergency declaration.

“I think what is clear in the Senate is there will be enough votes to pass the resolution of disapproval, which will then be vetoed by the president,” McConnell told reporters in Kentucky. “And then, in all likelihood, the veto will be upheld in the House.”

Trump has threatened to veto the resolution if it reaches his desk. Even so, congressional approval of the measure would mark a turning point in his presidency. Not only would it be the first time Trump has issued a veto, it would put him at odds with members of his own party over how to deliver one of the key promises of his 2016 presidential campaign.

Republicans say that while they support Trump’s objective – building a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border – several have serious reservations about declaring a national emergency to free up billions of dollars for the structure. Some lawmakers also have raised concerns that Trump is taking money from key military programs to fund the barrier.

Trump declared a national emergency along the border on Feb. 15 to free up billions of dollars for a border wall. The decision came after Congress refused to give him the $5.7 billion he had demanded for the barrier.

Trump said he wants the wall to stop drugs and gangs from coming into the U.S., even though an analysis of data indicates the vast majority of narcotics enters through country ports of entry, not the wide swaths of border in between where additional barriers could be erected, experts say.

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., is the latest GOP senator to voice objections to an emergency declaration. Paul said during a speech in Kentucky on Saturday that approving the emergency declaration would be tantamount to giving “extra-Constitutional powers to the president” – something he said he’s unwilling to do.

“I can’t vote to give the president the power to spend money that hasn’t been appropriated by Congress,” Paul said, as reported by the Bowling Green Daily News. “We may want more money for border security, but Congress didn’t authorize it. If we take away those checks and balances, it’s a dangerous thing.”

Some House Republicans made the same argument last week, when 13 of them joined all Democrats in voting to block Trump's declaration, sending the measure to the Senate. McConnell has said the Senate will take up the measure by March 15.

Meanwhile, some GOP senators are looking to give Trump a way out.

Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., who has called an emergency declaration "inconsistent with the U.S. Constitution," offered an alternative last week.

Instead of declaring a national emergency, Alexander suggested Trump could secure money for his border wall by tapping into funds that Congress already approved has various programs. Not only would that give Trump access to the money he wants, it could potentially avoid months and years of litigation, Alexander said.

As the Senate vote approaches, several GOP senators said they're still deciding how they will vote. Others support Trump, saying he’s doing what he needs to do to protect the nation’s borders.

“The president’s not exercising any power that Congress didn’t give him," said Sen. John Kennedy, R-La. “Had Congress done its job instead of playing politics, he wouldn’t have to do it.”

Democrats, meanwhile, have complained Trump is trying to do an “end run around the Constitution."

“This is a president who is grasping for power, and he has to be reined in," said New Mexico Sen. Tom Udall, who serves on the Senate Appropriations Committee.

Growing list of Republicans voice concerns
Paul's weekend announcement that he opposes the emergency declaration makes him the fourth Senate Republican who has said they will vote to stop it. His decision gives opponents the 51 votes they need to block Trump's declaration.

The other three Republicans who have said they will vote to stop the declaration are Thom Tillis of North Carolina, Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska.

"As a U.S. senator, I cannot justify providing the executive with more ways to bypass Congress," Tillis wrote in an op-ed in The Washington Post, laying out his concerns. "As a conservative, I cannot endorse a precedent that I know future left-wing presidents will exploit to advance radical policies that will erode economic and individual freedoms."

Tillis was elected in 2014 and is up for re-election in 2020. The nonpartisan Cook Political Report has rated the seat “likely Republican.”

North Carolina Sen. Thom Tillis at his office located in Senate Dirksen Building.
JACK GRUBER, USA TODAY
Collins, who is also up for re-election next year, said she’s concerned about Trump using the declaration to repurpose billions of dollars that Congress has already appropriated.

It “strikes me as undermining the appropriations process, the will of Congress and of being of dubious constitutionality,'' she said.

Collins, who is serving her fourth term, is a moderate Republican who sometimes breaks with her party on key issues, including health care. She criticized a federal judge's ruling last December to overturn the Affordable Care Act, saying it was “too sweeping.”

She was also among the three Republicans, including the late Arizona Sen. John McCain and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, who voted last summer against the Republican's “skinny repeal bill,” killing the GOP health care measure.

All eyes were also on Collins last fall when the Senate voted on the controversial confirmation of U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, who had come under fire for accusations of sexual assault committed decades ago.

Collins, who had been on the fence for months, voted for Kavanaugh, saying that voting against him without witnesses or proof could start a "dangerous" precedent.

And as recently as last week Collins was the lone Republican to oppose the nomination of Andrew Wheeler, who was narrowly confirmed as Trump’s pick to head the Environmental Protection Agency. Collins said she opposed the nomination because, as acting administrator, Wheeler supported policies that “are not in the best interest of our environment and public health, particularly given the threat of climate change to our nation."

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, announces support for Brett Kavanaugh on Senate floor, Oct. 5, 2018, Washington, D.C.
SENATE TV VIA AP
Murkowski said she will support the resolution to block Trump's emergency declaration.

Murkowski, who has been in the Senate since 2002, is up for re-election in 2022. She shocked the political world in 2010 when she waged a successful write-in campaign after losing her party’s primary. Murkowski, the daughter of former Alaska governor and senator Frank Murkowski, has little allegiance to the national party that some say abandoned her during her re-election bid.

Murkowski was the only Republican to vote against Kavanaugh's appointment. She voted as “present” as a collegial gesture for her Republican colleague Sen. Steve Daines, who supported Kavanaugh but was attending his daughter's wedding.

Murkowski has worked across the aisle on issues important to her state, including with former Democrat Sen. Mary Landrieu of Louisiana on energy policies.

Murkowski, along with Collins, also voted against the confirmation of Betsy DeVos, Trump’s choice to head the Department of Education.

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Ala., speaks Dec. 11, 2018, after an order withdrawing federal protections for countless waterways and wetland was signed at EPA headquarters in Washington, D.C.
CLIFF OWEN, AP
Arizona’s Sen. Martha McSally, a newcomer to the chamber, also has voiced concerns about the emergency declaration.

McSally, appointed last December to fill McCain's seat, said recently she was "seeking assurances that the money will not come from Arizona military construction projects" for her vote supporting the president.

McSally is expected to be in a competitive races in the 2020 special election. The Cook Political Report rates the seat "leans Republican." Earlier this month, Mark Kelly, a retired U.S. Navy pilot and the husband of former Rep. Gabby Giffords, announced his plans to run for the seat.

How did it fare in the House?
Despite concerns raised by some GOP lawmakers, only 13 broke ranks with the party and voted in favor of the Democratic backed resolution when it passed the House last week.

Several of them, including Reps. Will Hurd of Texas, Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania and Fred Upton of Michigan, are expected to run in competitive races in 2020.

Most Republicans voted along party lines and against the resolution, citing the need for more border security.

Contributing: Eliza Collins, Maureen Groppe

Originally Published 2 hours ago



© Copyright Gannett 2019
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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Tue Mar 05, 2019 2:53 pm

Developing now, Tuesday, March 5, 2019

DEMOCRATS LAUNCH NEW, WIDE-REACHING PROBE INTO TRUMP: House Democrats on Monday opened a huge new avenue in their investigations into President Trump, with the chairman of the Judiciary Committee firing off document requests to dozens of figures from the president's administration, family and business ... Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., said Monday the committee served document requests to 81 agencies, entities and individuals, as part of a new probe into "alleged obstruction of justice, public corruption, and other abuses of power by President Trump." Nadler said the investigations were necessary to make sure the Trump presidency isn't a dictatorship. In addition to the White House, Nadler is also seeking information from Trump family members, like Donald Trump Jr., Eric Trump and Jared Kushner; from former administration figures like former chief of staff Reince Priebus, former national security adviser Mike Flynn, former Attorney General Jeff Sessions and former spokeswoman Hope Hicks; and from Trump campaign figures like Brad Parscale and Corey Lewandowski.

In addition, Intelligence Committee chairman Adam Schiff, Foreign Affairs Committee chairman Eliot Engel, and Oversight Committee chairman Elijah Cummings on Monday formally demanded interviews with any translators who witnessed Trump's communications with Russian President Vladimir Putin since Inauguration Day -- a request that comes as part of a sweeping series of inquiries virtually certain to be met with legal pushback by the White House. The only good news Trump received on the investigation front was that Attorney General William Barr will not recuse himself from Russia probe.









Political backlash to declaring emergency and the wall?



POLITICO

Graham: Trump says GOP senators opposing him are ‘playing with fire’
By BURGESS EVERETT

03/05/2019 03:38 PM EST

Lindsey Graham
South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham said his meeting with the president focused mostly on the border and the number of illegal crossings as Trump faces certain bipartisan defeat on his emergency declaration in the Senate. | Alex Wong/Getty Images

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President Donald Trump said Senate Republicans considering opposition to his emergency declaration on the border are "playing with fire," according to Sen. Lindsey Graham, who met with the president on Tuesday morning.

The South Carolina Republican said his meeting with the president focused mostly on the border and the number of illegal crossings as Trump faces certain bipartisan defeat on his emergency declaration in the Senate later this month.

Story Continued Below


Four Republican senators have said they will join 47 Senate Democrats in voting to block the national emergency declaration, though Trump will veto it and Congress likely won't be able to muster the votes to override it. And though Trump is not waging a massive campaign to convert Republicans to his side, he's acutely aware of the politics of the issue.

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"He says he thinks Republicans are playing with fire here because most Republicans, anyway, most people I hope, will see that the border is in a state of crisis," Graham said, adding that Trump believes GOP senators that defy him are likely to face a political backlash. "That's his observation, but he's not out there calling people out or anything."

Graham said Trump also groused about the wide-ranging investigations launched by the Democratic House, and questioned why Democrats are eager to probe his administration and 2016 campaign but not cooperate on legislation.

"He believes they are taking a wrecking ball to his life. Clinton said that about us. They're going nuts," Graham said. "'It seems like nobody wants to solve any problems.' He said that a couple times. He said he's surprised. He thought it would be in everybody's interest [to do] infrastructure and stuff like that."

This story tagged under:
Senate Lindsey Graham Donald Trump Donald Trump 2020 Border Wall National Emergency Declaration National Emergency
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POLITICO

Graham: Trump says GOP senators opposing him are ‘playing with fire’
By BURGESS EVERETT

03/05/2019 03:38 PM EST

Lindsey Graham
South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham said his meeting with the president focused mostly on the border and the number of illegal crossings as Trump faces certain bipartisan defeat on his emergency declaration in the Senate. |


President Donald Trump said Senate Republicans considering opposition to his emergency declaration on the border are "playing with fire," according to Sen. Lindsey Graham, who met with the president on Tuesday morning.

The South Carolina Republican said his meeting with the president focused mostly on the border and the number of illegal crossings as Trump faces certain bipartisan defeat on his emergency declaration in the Senate later this month.




Four Republican senators have said they will join 47 Senate Democrats in voting to block the national emergency declaration, though Trump will veto it and Congress likely won't be able to muster the votes to override it. And though Trump is not waging a massive campaign to convert Republicans to his side, he's acutely aware of the politics of the issue.



"He says he thinks Republicans are playing with fire here because most Republicans, anyway, most people I hope, will see that the border is in a state of crisis," Graham said, adding that Trump believes GOP senators that defy him are likely to face a political backlash. "That's his observation, but he's not out there calling people out or anything."

Graham said Trump also groused about the wide-ranging investigations launched by the Democratic House, and questioned why Democrats are eager to probe his administration and 2016 campaign but not cooperate on legislation.

"He believes they are taking a wrecking ball to his life. Clinton said that about us. They're going nuts," Graham said. "'It seems like nobody wants to solve any problems.' He said that a couple times. He said he's surprised. He thought it would be in everybody's interest [to do] infrastructure and stuff like that."





-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Re: Trump enters the stage-is he a criminal?

Postby Meno_ » Wed Mar 06, 2019 3:28 pm

Bits by Joe Sumerlad
Updated
1 minute ago.
President launches late-night Twitter storm as poll shows most Americans think he is a criminal
Follow latest updates from Washington

Joe Sommerlad,
Samuel Osborne @SamuelOsborne93o
1 minute ago

Click to follow
The Independent US

Donald Trump has lashed out at a number of old enemies on Twitter overnight, including Hillary Clinton, as his frustration with House Democrats and the investigations surrounding him threatens to boil over.

The president accused the Democrats of “playing games” by instigating “McCarthyite” congressional investigations against him rather than getting on with the business of government, refusing to hand over files related to his son-in-law Jared Kushner’s security clearance to the House Oversight Committee and indicating he might not co-operate with the House Judiciary Committee’s abuse of power investigation into his inner circle.

Meanwhile, a damning new poll has emerged suggesting two-thirds of American voters believe he committed a crime before his election.

We’ll tell you what’s true. You can form your own view.
From $0.18 a day, more exclusives, analysis and extras.Subscribe now
On Tuesday, Mr Trump also walked back his decision to pull all US troops out of Syria, saying he now agreed “100 per cent” with keeping a military presence there.

Meanwhile, the president’s former lawyer, Michael Cohen, will return to Capitol Hill for a fourth day of testimony.

KEY POINTS
Trump lashes out at Democratic enemies on Twitter
Refuses to hand over files on Jared Kushner's security clearance
Two-thirds believe president a criminal, poll finds
15 minutes ago
Donald Trump and his son Eric made a surprise phone call to a man dying of cystic fibrosis.

The president told 44-year-old Jay Barrett of West Haven, Connecticut: "I wish you could come to a rally. I wish you could come ... You keep that fight going. We both fight."

The call was made possible by Mr Barrett's sister, West Haven City councilwoman Bridgette Hoskie, who describes herself as "100 per cent Democrat".
Joe Sommerlad
6 March 2019 14:08
33 minutes ago
The US trade deficit has jumped nearly 19 per cent, undermining a key commitment by President Trump.

The US trade imbalance for 2018 widened to a decade-long high of $261bn (£199bn). The gap with China on goods widened to an all-time record of $419.2bn (£319bn).

Mr Trump promised to cut the trade imbalance on the belief it would bring back overseas factory jobs and bolster the broader US economy.

But America's dependence on imports appears to have increased after the tariffs Mr Trump imposed last year on foreign steel, aluminium and Chinese products.

An acceleration in economic growth last year from President Trump's debt-funded tax cuts helped to boost the appetite for foreign goods.
Samuel Osborne
6 March 2019 13:50
43 minutes ago
Melania Trump joined in with her husband's attack on the media on Tuesday.

On tour in Las Vegas to promote her "Be Best" anti-bullying initiative and discuss the impact of the opioid crisis on children, the first lady said: "I challenge the press to devote as much time to the lives lost and the potential lives that could be saved by dedicating the same amount of coverage that you do to idle gossip or trivial stories."

"When we see breaking news on TV or the front pages of newspapers, it is my hope that it can be about how many lives we were able to save through education and honest dialogue."
Joe Sommerlad
6 March 2019 14:18
58 minutes ago
Here's an unusual aside from Trumpland: Aberdeen and Scotland footballer Scott McKenna has come under fire for accepting a post as ambassador of Donald Trump's nearby golf course.

International footballer criticised after becoming ambassador for Trump's golf course
McKenna is an avid golfer and claims it is a privilege to represent the Aberdeenshire club
Joe Sommerlad
6 March 2019 12:05
1 hour ago
A spike in arrests on the US border with Mexico has prompted critics of President Trump to warn his approach to tackling illegal immigration is not only not working but having an encouraging effect.

Around 76,000 people were picked up by border agents in February, a 50 percent increase year-on-year and a 12-year high.

Here's Clark Mindock with more.


Trump administration’s 'chaotic approach' to border security is 'encouraging illegal migration’
Chaotic approach to southern border security is encouraging illegal migration, says critic
Joe Sommerlad
6 March 2019 14:17
1 hour ago
This should not be overlooked.

Just two months after President Trump announced all American troops would be leaving Syria, the commander-in-chief has backpedalled on his decision in a letter to Congress, stating he now agrees “100 per cent” with keeping a military presence in the conflict-struck country.

Here's Sarah Harvard.

Trump flip-flops on Syria, now agrees ‘100%’ with keeping troops
In December the president announced withdrawing all troops from country
Joe Sommerlad
6 March 2019 11:49
1 hour ago
In his dramatic appearance before the House Oversight Committee last week, one of Cohen's revelations was that the president asked him to threaten his old schools in order to ensure they would not release his exam grades to the media.

Here's more on how Mr Trump sought to bury the past.

How Trump managed to bury his high school records
Revelations add fresh details to allegations made by president's former lawyer Michael Cohen last week
Joe Sommerlad
6 March 2019 12:00
1 hour ago
Michael Cohen is due back before the House Intelligence Committee today for another private hearing after three days of headline-grabbing testimony on Capitol Hill last week.

The question of whether he discussed presidential pardons with White House attorneys after the FBI raided his home and business premises last April is thought to be on the bill for the latest behind-closed-doors session.

No pardon was ever given and Cohen ultimately wound up pleading guilty and cooperating against the president in separate investigations by the special counsel and by federal prosecutors in New York. He begins a three-year jail sentence in May.

While there is nothing inherently improper about a subject in a criminal investigation seeking a pardon from a president given the president's wide latitude in granting them, representatives have requested information about talks on possible pardons for Cohen and other defendants close to the president who have become entangled in Mueller's investigation.

The House Intelligence Committee's chairman Adam Schiff said after last week's private meeting with Cohen that the committee had "additional document requests" that they were discussing with him. Mr Schiff would not comment on the substance of the interview, but said it helped "to shed light on a lot of issues that are very core to our investigation".

The intelligence panel is investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election and whether Mr Trump's campaign coordinated with the Russians in any way. They are also looking into Trump's foreign financial dealings and whether there was obstruction of justice.
Joe Sommerlad
6 March 2019 11:29
2 hours ago
This was the response from "Crooked Hillary" to the president's taunting tweet by the way.

Absolutely textbook use of a Mean Girls GIF.
Joe Sommerlad
6 March 2019 11:21
2 hours ago
Meanwhile, a damaging poll from Quinnipac University has found that a staggering 45 percent of American voters surveyed believe President Trump committed a crime before he was elected.

Here's Chris Baynes.

Two-thirds of Americans think Trump is a criminal, poll finds
'Michael Cohen, a known liar headed to the big house, has more credibility than the leader of the free world', says pollster
Joe Sommerlad
6 March 2019 11:51
2 hours ago
The president's new line of attack is to accuse House Democrats of wasting the government's time with "hoax" investigations.

“Essentially what they are saying is the campaign begins,” he told reporters on Tuesday. “Instead of doing infrastructure, instead of doing healthcare, instead of doing so many things they should be doing, they want to play games.”

He also hinted he might not necessarily co-operate with Jerrold Nadler's House Judiciary Committee.

Trump suggests he will not cooperate with investigation into abuse of power
President described investigation as 'disgrace to our country'
Joe Sommerlad
6 March 2019 11:18
3 hours ago
Here's a little more on that, with CNN reporting the president also pressured former chief-of-staff John Kelly and ex-White House counsel to grant the same access to his daughter Ivanka.

Trump 'pressured White House officials' to get security clearance for Ivanka
It follows reports president made similar demands on behalf of Jared Kushner
Joe Sommerlad
6 March 2019 11:39
3 hours ago
The president appears to be digging in his heels on the investigations, the White House refusing to turn over information on his son-in-law Jared Kushner's security clearance, granted in spite of concerns raised by intelligence officials.

Mr Trump branded the decision "a disgrace" before addressing a gathering of military veterans on suicide among former members of the armed forces from the Roosevelt Room.

House Oversight Committee chair Elijah Cummings said he is considering his "next steps".

Here's Clark Mindock.

Trump refuses to hand over ‘Kushner clearance’ documents to Congress: ‘It’s a disgrace’
House Democrats are considering 'next steps' as the White House refused to supply clearance documents
Joe Sommerlad
6 March 2019 11:08
3 hours ago
President Trump laid into his Democratic rivals on Twitter last night, mocking both 2016 rival Hillary Clinton and billionaire party donor Tom Steyer for their decisions not to run against him in 2020.

"Aw-shucks, does that mean I won’t get to run against her again? She will be sorely missed!" he sneered at Ms Clinton before applying one of his signature nicknames to the hedge fund philanthropist, branding him "Weirdo Tom Steyer" and saying he lacked the "guts" to run.

He also retweeted attacks on the House Democrats' "fishing expeditions" into his affairs from his press secretary Sarah Sanders and Republican National Committee chairwoman Ronna McDaniel, as well as another plug for Fox News, broadcasting an interview with Republican congressman Jim Jordan on the opposition's "colossally stupid decision to overreach with overbroad subpoenas".

In another tweet, he quoted Hans von Spakovsky, a lawyer who was appointed to the president’s ill-fated commission on election integrity, to support his contention Democrats are “copying Joseph McCarthy” and “don’t have any evidence of wrongdoing.”

Here's Tom Embury-Dennis on the president's latest fever dream.

Trump launches overnight tirade after refusing to hand documents requested by Congress
Billionaire reacts angrily to widening congressional probes into his conduct in office
Joe Sommerlad
6 March 2019 11:55
3 hours ago
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Re: staging the groundwork so soon for the 2020 election

Postby Meno_ » Wed Mar 06, 2019 8:08 pm

Even as the 2020 race begins in earnest, President Donald Trump is already suggesting that Democrats cannot beat him fairly -- raising the specter that if he loses next November, he will suggest that the election was not legitimate.

"The Democrats in Congress yesterday were vicious and totally showed their cards for everyone to see," Trump tweeted Tuesday, referring to House Democrats' launching of a broad-scale investigation into him. "When the Republicans had the Majority they never acted with such hatred and scorn! The Dems are trying to win an election in 2020 that they know they cannot legitimately win!"



Donald Trump's mental health:


https://youtu.be/U6f4OLgzTVE
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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Thu Mar 07, 2019 1:14 am

Between the politocal absolute and the nearing of the psychologocally relative is where Trump finds himself.

The absolute is approaching, the singularity, which is upon which the stable genius can identify with, and become a bridge upon, as he has been subscribed by those to whom he may have been forced into an alliance.

The mirror through which he may recapture that which with his unfamiliarity serves a political and social service.

Sure, society is not acquainted well enough to deal with, but the channels under ground do serve a purpose , that is, presenting a stage, through which. the mirror reflects that , which has been originally presented.

He takes this chance of redemption from the general border, through which all has to pass, a border line from which no exit cam be individually be attempted. He does have backup who will follow him religiously, through the manager irrationality, which sans direction, may mean the onset of a terrible fate.

This glimmer of hope, comes at a price of going through the very narrow grey area , in between, that, which is neither here nor there, reversible at a whim, and befuddling all but those, who manage controversy, based on a near perfect assimilation between the absolute and the relative, the certain and the uncertain, the contradictory and the accommodating, : for this, no amount of politocal venom may unseat him in disgrace.

The freedom to change is position will be nullified by the reason of presumptive necessity. He is the broad stroke of.a.crayon which needs to cover the fine lines, which no one bothers to read, nor is actually capable of.

Note: this is one generic possibility among others, and is only possible in a world where every thing is allowed, and reflected.and again also all that is deflects.


As a matter of fact, one can't help to to feel for the guy. But that's only one feeling coming through.
Last edited by Meno_ on Thu Mar 07, 2019 2:39 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Trump enters the stage Mueller Report

Postby Meno_ » Thu Mar 07, 2019 1:21 am

From the publication : Independent

Mueller report to be 'instantly' printed as a book, if made public.
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Re: Trump enters the stage antisemitism, fake news & identit

Postby Meno_ » Thu Mar 07, 2019 2:09 pm

Trump news live - President attacks Democrats over antisemitism and threatens to block 'Fake News Networks' from 2020 debates

Another nerve exposed, the mud slinging(the swamp being cleaned by throwing projectiles) grows by leaps and bounds, with no holds barred.

What can be on the back of the mind of such affront to human intelligence?
Maybe either that it is on the way out unless falsity is accepted as some form of truth, or that the mind as an instrument of measuring reality is on the verge of getting lost.
Either choice suffices , but a left wing Democratic rejection may give the impression of throwing the baby away with the bathwater. It's a catch 22.

On the economic front of trade and the ID:

It’s a neat microcosm of President Trump’s economic policy: He picks a yardstick to measure the American economy — the trade deficit — that’s mostly meaningless. He spends years criticizing it as too high and promising to reduce it. And under his administration, it surges.
“By just about any measure you pick,” Slate’s Jordan Weissman writes, “his effort appears to have been an absolute flop.”
“He set out to fix a non-problem (a trade deficit) and created real ones including international conflict, higher consumer prices and gross inefficiency in our economy,” The Washington Post’s Jennifer Rubin writes, of the New York Times in today's opinion section.
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Re: Trump enters the stage hush money

Postby Meno_ » Fri Mar 08, 2019 1:04 am

President Trump says hush money does not amount to campaign finance violation
DAVID JACKSON | USA TODAY | 2 hours ago


President Trump's former lawyer, Michael Cohen, paid money to women to be quiet about alleged affairs with Trump during his 2016 campaign.
USA TODAY
WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump, under federal investigation over hush money to an alleged ex-mistress, said Thursday it has nothing to do with campaign finance laws – and appeared to acknowledge payments he previously said he knew nothing about.


"It was not a campaign contribution, and there were no violations of the campaign finance laws by me. Fake News!" Trump tweeted.

Trump has denied having an affair with adult film star Stormy Daniels, and previously denied knowing about payments to her, referring questions about the matter to Michael Cohen – the ex-personal attorney who now says Trump authorized the payoffs.





Federal prosecutors apparently disagree. They have said in court filings that the payment to Daniels and another to former Playboy playmate Karen McDougal violated laws that limit contributions to candidates. They alleged that Cohen, who pleaded guilty to violating campaign finance laws, orchestrated the payments at Trump direction.

In congressional testimony last week, Cohen said Trump and his company reimbursed him for $130,000 paid to Daniels in order to keep her quiet right before the 2016 presidential election.

It was not a campaign contribution, and there were no violations of the campaign finance laws by me. Fake News!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) March 7, 2019
Federal prosecutors are investigating whether the hush money amounted to an unreported and illegal campaign contribution, in that it was designed to influence the outcome of the election.

Cohen faces a three-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to campaign finance violations, tax evasion and lying to Congress, including allegations stemming from his involvement in the Daniels matter.

Trump did not address Cohen in his brief tweet, but has accused his former lawyer of lying in an effort to somehow reduce his prison sentence.

His current lawyers, such as Rudy Giuliani, have said the payments to Daniels amounted to a personal expense, not a campaign contribution.

More: Cohen only flipped because he got caught. That's all we can expect in the Trump era.

More: Michael Cohen's testimony prompts a new question: In web of Trump investigations, is anyone safe?


Updated 2 hours ago

© Copyright Gannett 2019
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Re: Trump enters the stage duplicity

Postby Meno_ » Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:03 pm

The strength exhibited by Trump, in spite of a state of affairs which presents a scenario putting the Nixon debacle into a far less troublesome light compared to the present one, only one conclusion can be drawn:

Identity politics plays a central role in the resiliency by which the present constitutional issues align the general framework by whose measure the factual evidence withstands its feedback into its own credibility issue.

The fracturing of this delicate balance between the held contradictory use of languages, demands both parties ' constitutional need to sustain the very meaning of their differing platforms to
Insist on qualify their differing political viewpoints to reflect their basic constitutional need to formally guarantee their very political right to exist as a defined political force.

The very being of the political social contract as a representitive national unity is under siege, with both parties reducing the particular elemental personal and induvidualmy reflected within the more generally vested dynamics of the processes of representative government.
The basis of representation are under assault, not from external identifiable causes, but from the internally and generally misunderstood state of being, which has lost the very ground in its own dynamic.

The state is in trouble primarily as resulting from primary effects from obvious signs of decay, such as inner city turmoil, visible on the faces of discontent, or the reminders of diminishing capacity to enjoy the fruits of labor so visible on the echoes of the GreY and the recent depression: , literally reminded for those still remembering it, by the present of the ranks of homeless abounding everywhere.

It is not a matter of reflection which carries the whole general debt of political diversity forward by such reflection, but by immigrating the socially vast underprivileged, who seem to revel and function far better, in an overwhelmingly more challenging new environment .

It is not the international trepidation, sm as described in the trade imbalance or taxation who h are the patent casual agents responsible for diminishing senses of political equilibrium, but the grass root misunderstanding of where and how the US empire's dysfunction becoming a vacuous question, which no amount of machinations can rearrange in an understood national policy.

The crisis stems from an internal division, aptly vested with a dynamic hope that still is reigned in by reference to the state inscribed and vested in immortal words by the founding fathers, abiding in the paternalistic and thetic framework of fate in liberty.

This constitutional crisis can not be understood in a unified understanding
ant longer, and the forces of power take advantage to this constitutional vulnerability, hence no salvation can be abstracted , other then from an e executive, a funny gut, who can still in spite hope, because he is representative of the contradiction , and using the language appropriate to it.

The identity and the economy of the soul of the United States is best described at this moment in time, when the model of our way of existence is represented by a newly firmed chief executive molded out of a failing and divisive Congress, and an equally ineffective Judiciary.

The failing hope of Capitalistic Democracy, is beginning to transform into a meaningless visual anachr anachronism , rising Phoenix like, from a time before society could be reflected in it's apparent self reflection..


(Unedited )
Last edited by Meno_ on Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:19 pm

The essential dynamic lies not in the rhetoric, promoting an elusive nationalism, but in the hidden contradictory process by which internationalism and the New World order can save Capitalism as a socially viable guarantor of peace in a fractured world, there being no other viable alternative. The contradiction is out there in a rhetoric dressed in the anesthetic of an imagenitive reactivism, lulling the senses with the visions of the good old times. Anyone capable to understand the meaning of the eternal return should know, that such symbolism merely functions as a self serving wish fulfilling device, a metaphor to cover basic fears of nihilistic abandonment. The cover to Trumpism serves to immunize the danger of exposure to a possible authorial harm, for nihilism did not start with Nietzsche, but Dostoevsky, and the resulting trouble can be sources to the boyars, sho so terribly dealt with the serfs, and likewise most generally how the West was won through subjugation and at times total nihilization through colonial suppression.

(Unedited)
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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Fri Mar 08, 2019 9:51 pm

Popularity graphs of Trump and other https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_ ... val_rating U.S. presidents .
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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Fri Mar 08, 2019 9:54 pm

Meno_ wrote:Popularity graphs of Trump and other https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_ ... val_rating U.S. presidents .





It appears that Truman, Nixon and Trump share that honor!
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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Fri Mar 08, 2019 10:07 pm

WHITE HOUSE
Manafort sentencing prompts Trump to claim vindication. But president misstated judge's declaration.
The president again slammed the special counsel's Russia investigation as a "Witch Hunt Hoax."

President Donald Trump speaks during the first meeting of the American Workforce Policy Advisory Board in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, on March 6, 2019.Saul Loeb / AFP - Getty Images

March 8, 2019, 9:16 AM ET / Updated March 8, 2019, 10:52 AM ET
By Dartunorro Clark
President Donald Trump, after his former campaign chairman was sentenced to nearly four years in prison for tax and bank fraud, said Friday that those involved in Paul Manafort's case affirmed there was "no collusion" with Russia.

"Both the Judge and the lawyer in the Paul Manafort case stated loudly and for the world to hear that there was NO COLLUSION with Russia. But the Witch Hunt Hoax continues as you now add these statements to House & Senate Intelligence & Senator Burr. So bad for our Country!" Trump tweeted.

Speaking to reporters on the South Lawn of the White House before his trip to Alabama to tour storm-damaged areas, Trump repeated that the "judge said there was no collusion with Russia," adding that he feels "very badly" for Manafort.


But that's not what the judge overseeing the case said.

Before announcing Manafort's sentence Thursday, Judge T.S. Ellis reminded the court that the longtime political operative's crimes were not related to special counsel Robert Mueller’s chief mandate — Russian election interference and whether Trump campaign officials colluded with the Kremlin.

Manafort, a longtime Republican political operative, received 47 months behind bars, far less than the sentence called for under federal sentencing guidelines.


Manafort was convicted last August in Virginia federal court on eight felony counts — five counts of tax fraud, one count of failure to file a report of foreign bank and financial accounts and two counts of bank fraud. The judge declared a mistrial on the 10 other charges he faced. Manafort faces a second sentencing hearing in federal court in Washington, D.C., on March 13 on two conspiracy counts.

Kevin Downing, Manafort's defense attorney, made a brief statement after the hearing ended on Thursday.

"There is absolutely no evidence that Paul Manafort was involved with any collusion with any government official from Russia," he told reporters.

The Senate Intelligence Committee, which is chaired by GOP Sen. Richard Burr of North Carolina, wrapped up its Russia investigation in February and said it uncovered no direct evidence of a conspiracy between the Trump campaign and Russia after two years and 200 interviews.


House Republicans announced last year they had found no evidence of collusion, but their report came under swift criticism as a partisan result that excluded Democrats.

However, since regaining control of the House, Democrats have launched several probes that include examining any links between Russia and the Trump campaign as well as if Trump broke the law while in office.


Dartunorro Clark is a political reporter for NBC News
© 2019 NBC UNIVERSAL
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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Sat Mar 09, 2019 9:21 pm

News > World > Americas

Erik Prince: Blackwater founder admits Trump Tower meeting with Donald Jr in disastrous interview
'Sure looks like Erik Prince committed perjury,' congressman says

Tom Embury-Dennis @tomemburyd
4 hours ago

Click to follow
The Independent US
Donald Trump ally Erik Prince may have committed perjury, a congressman has said, after the former Navy Seal said for the first time he held a meeting with one of the US president’s sons to discuss “Iran policy”.

Mr Prince, founder of controversial military contractor Blackwater USA, admitted he met Donald Trump Jr and an emissary for Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in Trump Tower ahead of the presidential election.


The admission comes more than a year after the 49-year-old, brother of US education secretary Betsy DeVos, failed to disclose the meeting under oath to the House intelligence committee, according to a public transcript.

We’ll tell you what’s true. You can form your own view.
From $0.18 a day, more exclusives, analysis and extras.Subscribe now
According to The New York Times, Mr Prince organised the August 2016 meeting with Mr Trump’s eldest son and Lebanese-American businessman George Nader, who reportedly revealed Saudi Arabia and the UAE wanted to help Mr Trump in his bid for the presidency.


The meeting also reportedly included Stephen Miller, now Mr Trump’s senior policy adviser, and an Israeli social media expert called Joel Zamel.

Convicted criminals among Trump's former staff
Show all 5
Michael Cohen
Paul Manafort
George Papadopoulos
Michael Flynn
During the devastating televised interview with Al Jazeeera' Mehdi Hasan, which was aired on Friday, Mr Prince acknowledged the meeting happened, but said he was not asked about contacts with the Trump campaign by the House committee.


Facing intense and meticulous interrogation from Hasan, he later changed tack, suggesting he did reveal the meeting during the testimony to lawmakers.

Read more
Trump autographs bibles while meeting disaster victims
Trump or Cohen: Who can you trust in the ongoing blame game?
How to make sense of the Trump presidency in an era of political chaos
According to the transcript, Republican congressman Tom Rooney asked Mr Prince, “So there was no other formal communications or contact with the campaign?” in reference to the Trump campaign.

Mr Prince replied: “Correct.”

Pressed by Mr Hasan, Mr Prince suggested they “may have got the transcript wrong”, to audible laughs from the studio audience.

“I don’t know, I certainly remember discussing it with the investigators,” Mr Prince added.

Ted Lieu, a congressman for California and a frequent Trump critic, shared footage of the interview on Twitter, and wrote: “Sure looks like Erik Prince committed perjury.”

A former special counsel at the Department of Defense, Ryan Goodman, tweeted: “Now seems obvious that Erik Prince lied to Congress about Aug 2016 Trump Tower meeting with Don Jr.”


Mr Prince’s comments are the first time anyone reportedly involved in the meeting has publicly spoken out about it, and the first suggestion it could have been about Iran.

The New York Times reported Mr Nader was offering “help” on behalf of Saudi Arabia and the UAE to Mr Trump’s candidacy, while Mr Zemel touted a proposal by his company to assist the campaign using social media manipulation.

Trump calls Russia investigation a 'collusion witch hoax' outside White House
A lawyer for Donald Trump Jr told the newspaper last year his client “recalls” a meeting involving Mr Prince and Mr Nader about a “social media platform or marketing strategy”.


“He was not interested and that was the end of it,” he added.

Blackwater, which Mr Prince sold in 2010, made headlines three years earlier when its mercenaries killed 17 unarmed civilians in Iraq when they opened fire in a crowded square in Baghdad.

Since Blackwater’s creation, the company has been awarded billions of dollars in US government security contracts, as well as hundreds of millions in classified contracts from the CIA.

Mr Prince has been contacted for comment.
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Re: Trump the Religious zealot

Postby Meno_ » Sun Mar 10, 2019 12:10 am

SUBSCRIBE
Trump Is Autographing Bibles Now So That's a Wrap on Humanity, Right?
BY R. ERIC THOMAS MAR 8, 2019
image
CAROLYN KASTER/AP/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Donald Trump, President of the United States and Professional Twitter Bully, spent some time in Alabama today greeting people and autographing items, among them hats, $100 bills, and Bibles. As in The Bible.


ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

To quote Judas in the song "Heaven on Their Minds," "Listen. Jesus. I don't like what I see."

The first family was in Opelika, Alabama, today visiting tornado-ravaged areas and meeting with residents. At one point, they stopped into a Baptist church and things, well, went completely off the rails. Someone actually handed a Bible to Donald Trump and asked him to put his scribble on it. Donald Trump, the man who opted out of saying the Apostle's Creed at President Bush's funeral. That Donald Trump.


I'm not saying that anyone has to say The Apostle's Creed, but it's sort of part of the whole religious deal. Just surprising that Donald Trump, basically a missionary, took a pass on it.

Also surprising: Donald Trump, who is a pointed example in many a Sunday morning sermon, agreed to sign a Bible. I feel like it's common knowledge that the only people writing on Bibles are grandmothers writing down important dates on the inside cover. Autographs are definitely a new area. Does he think he wrote it, like he also thinks he wrote The Art of the Deal? Very possible.

US-POLITICS-WEATHER-TRUMP
Donald Trump signs a hat and a $100 bill.
NICHOLAS KAMMGETTY IMAGES
ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Or is he signing it because of his pivotal guest appearance in the Book of Revelation? He's like, "Don't spoil the end for yourself; I got big plans."

I know given Trump's history, his behavior, his policies, and all of the words he says, it's hard to think of a more pious person, but for argument's sake, why would you want Trump to sign your religious text? It's like someone asking him to rub some of his bronzer on the Shroud of Turin. Peculiar! What is a person going to do with a Trump Bible? Is this a summoning ritual? A horcrux? Make it make sense!

Does Donald Trump's signature make it more Bible-y? Like all other Bibles are just kidding but this one is kicking it into overdrive. Make the Bible Great Again???

Did he sign a golden calf after this, to really seal the deal?

President Trump Signs Proclamation Declaring Sunday Day Of Prayer For Victims Of Hurricane Harvery
ALEX WONGGETTY IMAGES
It's worth noting that Donald Trump: Superstar appears to have signed the cover of The Bible in question, continuing what is a probably a lifelong streak of literally never opening it. Good Lord!

R. ERIC THOMAS
R Eric Thomas is a Senior Staff Writer at ELLE.com, home of his daily humor column "Eric Reads the News," which skewers politics, pop culture, celebrity shade, and schaedenfreude.
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POLITICAL NEWS 2019 CULTURE DONALD TRUMP WON. READ THOSE 3 WORDS AGAIN. A MAJORITY OF WOMEN WANT TO SEE TRUMP IMPEACHED DOES TRUMP ACTUALLY KNOW WHAT A HANDSHAKE IS? DONALD TRUMP RECRUITS "WOMEN FOR TRUMP" COALITION SOMEONE MADE A DONALD TRUMP BURN BOOK PAGE "ME PARDON SELF," PRESIDENT MUMBLES TO NO ONE DONALD TRUMP AUTOGRAPH DONALD TRUMP AUTOGRAPHS BIBLE DONALD TRUMP SIGNS BIBLE DONALD TRUMP BIBLE DONALD TRUMP
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Re: Trump the Religious zealot

Postby Meno_ » Sun Mar 10, 2019 12:15 am

CAROLYN KASTER/AP/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Donald Trump, President of the United States and Professional Twitter Bully, spent some time in Alabama today greeting people and autographing items, among them hats, $100 bills, and Bibles. As in The Bible.




To quote Judas in the song "Heaven on Their Minds," "Listen. Jesus. I don't like what I see."

The first family was in Opelika, Alabama, today visiting tornado-ravaged areas and meeting with residents. At one point, they stopped into a Baptist church and things, well, went completely off the rails. Someone actually handed a Bible to Donald Trump and asked him to put his scribble on it. Donald Trump, the man who opted out of saying the Apostle's Creed at President Bush's funeral. That Donald Trump.


I'm not saying that anyone has to say The Apostle's Creed, but it's sort of part of the whole religious deal. Just surprising that Donald Trump, basically a missionary, took a pass on it.

Also surprising: Donald Trump, who is a pointed example in many a Sunday morning sermon, agreed to sign a Bible. I feel like it's common knowledge that the only people writing on Bibles are grandmothers writing down important dates on the inside cover. Autographs are definitely a new area. Does he think he wrote it, like he also thinks he wrote The Art of the Deal? Very possible.

US-POLITICS-WEATHER-TRUMP
Donald Trump signs a hat and a $100 bill.


Or is he signing it because of his pivotal guest appearance in the Book of Revelation? He's like, "Don't spoil the end for yourself; I got big plans."

I know given Trump's history, his behavior, his policies, and all of the words he says, it's hard to think of a more pious person, but for argument's sake, why would you want Trump to sign your religious text? It's like someone asking him to rub some of his bronzer on the Shroud of Turin. Peculiar! What is a person going to do with a Trump Bible? Is this a summoning ritual? A horcrux? Make it make sense!

Does Donald Trump's signature make it more Bible-y? Like all other Bibles are just kidding but this one is kicking it into overdrive. Make the Bible Great Again???

Did he sign a golden calf after this, to really seal the deal?

President Trump Signs Proclamation Declaring Sunday Day Of Prayer For Victims Of Hurricane Harvery

It's worth noting that Donald Trump: Superstar appears to have signed the cover of The Bible in question, continuing what is a probably a lifelong streak of literally never opening it. Good Lord!










©2019 Hearst Magazine Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved.[/quote]
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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Sun Mar 10, 2019 9:59 pm

various on Trump


OPINION
Republicans are willfully blind to the truths about Donald Trump: Readers sound off
From Michael Cohen's testimony to Ilhan Omar's comments to women dressing modestly, our readers share their thoughts on recent headlines.
USA TODAY | 9 hours ago



Conservative pundits are arguing that Michael Cohen’s testimony demolishes the Russian collusion narrative. No, it does not. Cohen said he had no evidence of collusion and said he was not part of the campaign. If anything, it adds to Cohen’s credibility. If he were lying about Trump to get even, he would add collusion to his list. He did not.

What defies reason is for these conservatives and President Donald Trump to claim that Cohen is a liar but is only telling the truth about no collusion.

Another foray into the twilight zone occurred when Republicans argued that if former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe was worried about possible collusion with Russia, he should’ve just told Congress and not CBS News.

Mob rules
DAVID FITZSIMMONS/THE ARIZONA STAR/POLITICALCARTOONS.COM
Talker: Michael Cohen's testimony, if true, confirms Trump's crimes

But remember when in the fall of 2016, the Obama administration approached leaders in Congress to warn about Russian interference in the election and Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., dismissed this as a Democratic ploy?

George Magakis Jr.; Norristown, Pa.

Trump fixers

Blind support of Trump is a disgrace
Letter to the editor:

Having watched the Michael Cohen hearing, it has become clear to me that President Donald Trump is — and has been — an unscrupulous businessman, fabricator of false and misleading statements, and a danger to our country.

Trump’s disdain for our Constitution, legislative and judicial branches, intelligence community and attacks on the press is in direct opposition to our Founding Father’s expectations.

Related: Michael Cohen only flipped because he got caught

The blind support of Trump from the Republican Party would be laughable if it wasn’t such a disgrace. The fact that they believe all the others are lying and the president is the only one telling the truth is such a stretch. To quote from the president’s Twitter: Sad.

Joe Brennan; Davenport, Fla.

AIPCC reprimand for Rep. Omar
R.J. MATSON/POLITICALCARTOONS.COM
Criticizing Israel is not anti-Semitic
Letter to the editor:

I’m fuming over the Democrats’ willingness to drag Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., through the mud again. As a proud Jewish person completely opposed to Israel’s settler state in Palestine, the false charges of anti-Semitism leveled at Omar render me — and thousands of other Jews who criticize Israel — invisible.

As if to prove her point, the backlash against Omar’s latest (accurate) tweet, has Democrats and Republicans, Jewish and non-Jewish, falling all over each other to defend Israel against criticism the same week the United Nations has said it may have committed war crimes in Gaza.

Talker: Ilhan Omar's comments were anti-Semitic rhetoric, let's not beat around the bush

I’m outraged at the continuing Islamophobic and racist attacks on Omar that come at the expense of addressing both the real growing anti-Semitic threat of rising white nationalism and fascism, and the continued oppression of Palestinians with the help of our tax dollars.

Lee Goodman-Gargagliano; Oakland, Calif.



President Donald Trump is far worse as a president than Richard Nixon ever was. Trump not only allegedly conspired with a hostile foreign power (Russia) to sway the 2016 presidential election, but he has also been accused of being involved in countless unethical and illegal business dealings.

Like a broken record, Trump keeps claiming he did not collude with Russia. But who cares about Russian collusion with all the other alleged crimes? Trump may have committed many other serious crimes that could result him being impeached or indicted. These include bank, tax and insurance fraud, witness tampering, making false statements, perjury, campaign finance violations, corruption, abuse of power, obstruction of justice, violation of the emoluments clause of the Constitution, judicial interference and misuse of inauguration and Trump charitable foundation funds.

Kenneth L. Zimmerman; Huntington Beach, Calif.



Every now and again we hear a cry regarding Muslim women wearing hijabs (head covering). As we celebrate Women’s History Month, it would be an opportune time for me to present the essence of Islamic teaching behind modest clothing and dispel a common misconception that this injunction takes away the freedom of Muslim women.

The real purpose of covering the head and body with modest clothes is to prevent a woman from being sexually objectified and grants her protection against unwanted harassment. Furthermore, nature has created men and women in different ways. It’s not about discrimination but having different capacities and faculties. For example, women can bear children but men cannot, and men are physically stronger than women. The #MeToo campaign is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to highlighting the vulnerability of women in society at large.

Talker: McSally shared her sexual assault story, will Trump finally believe accusers?

This injunction is not specific to Islam; it’s in other religions too. For example, in Christianity we see Mother Mary covering her head in most works of art. Nowadays, questions arise regarding the type of hijabs Muslim women wear. The answer is simple. At its core, Islam is a religion that teaches modesty and requires both men and women to safeguard their dignity.

Today, our society is experiencing the evils of provocative dressing, which have destroyed our peace in the form of extramarital affairs and broken relationships, for example. In such a situation, Islamic and Christian philosophy of “modest dressing” seems to guide us in the right direction.

Rafia Mansoor Waraich; Altoona, Wis.

The Art of the No Deal
JEFF KOTERBA/OMAHA WORLD HERALD/POLITICALCARTOONS.COM
US should denuclearize, not just North Korea
Letter to the editor:

Even though the summit in Hanoi between President Donald Trump and North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un ended early and there was no signed agreement, the summit was still both welcome and historic.

This summit provided further opportunities for diplomatic negotiations.

However, it seems that demands that North Korea agree to immediate and absolute denuclearization may not work nor be realistic.

Related: After summit diplomacy collapse, what's Donald Trump's North Korea Plan B?

The naked truth is that the U.S., Russia and China all possess arsenals of massive destruction.

Shall we demand the same complete “denuclearization” of ourselves first?

Diplomatic negotiations to achieve nuclear disarmament must be an ongoing effort, not only on the Korean front, but also between all nations.

Anh Lê; San Francisco



© Copyright Gannett 2019
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Mueller should inrterview the President in person

Postby Meno_ » Mon Mar 11, 2019 1:13 am

RUSSIA INVESTIGATION
Schiff: 'Mistake' for Mueller not to get Trump to testify under oath
"I also think that the special counsel feels some time pressure to conclude his work," Schiff told NBC's "Meet the Press."

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., expected to become chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, speaks with reporters as he arrives for Democratic leadership elections on Capitol Hill on Nov. 28.J. Scott Applewhite / AP
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March 10, 2019, 4:30 PM ET
By Allan Smith
It would be "a mistake" for special counsel Robert Mueller not to get in-person testimony from President Donald Trump, House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said Sunday on NBC's "Meet the Press."

"I think it is a mistake," Schiff said when asked by anchor Chuck Todd whether Mueller would err by deciding not to interview the president before a grand jury given the public testimony of others, such as Trump's former lawyer, Michael Cohen. "And I've said all along that I don't think Bob Mueller should rely on written answers. When you get written answers from a witness, it's really the lawyers' answers as much as the client's answer. And here you need to be able to ask follow-up questions in real time."


In November, Trump's legal team submitted written answers to Mueller's questions about Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and whether Trump's campaign colluded in that effort. They did not answer questions regarding possible obstruction of justice related to the Russia probe.


Trump's attorney, Rudy Giuliani, said in December that the president and his legal team would not provide Mueller with additional answers.

The submission of written answers followed months of back-and-forth between Trump's attorneys and Mueller's team about just what exactly the president would respond to and how he would provide those responses. In August, Trump's lawyers were already preparing a memo opposing a potential subpoena from Mueller to provide an in-person interview.

Responding to Schiff’s remarks, Giuliani accused Schiff in a text message to NBC News of coaching Cohen through his congressional testimony and questioned why Schiff would question the special counsel’s decision making.


"Since when did Schiff become the Special Counsel?" Giuliani said. "I thought he trusted Mueller. It only tells you Schiff wants to hurt the President no matter what. Also ask him how his staff spent 12 hours with Cohen to prepare his testimony and Cohen committed 4 to 6 demonstrable lies (perjury) during his testimony."

If Mueller were to file that subpoena only to be met with resistance from Trump's side, it could set off a monumental legal fight in federal court, possibly going all the way to the Supreme Court.

Schiff said he believes Mueller was constrained by then-acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker, who Schiff said "was appointed because he would be hostile to a subpoena on the president."

Whitaker, who is no longer at the Department of Justice, has since been replaced by Attorney General William Barr, who Schiff said "was chosen for the same hostility to his investigation, who would likely oppose that step."


"I also think that the special counsel feels some time pressure to conclude his work," Schiff said. "And knowing that the White House would drag out a fight over the subpoena, that may be an issue as well."

"But I do think ultimately it's a mistake because probably the best way to get the truth would be to put the president under oath," Schiff continued. "Because as he's made plain in the past, he feels it's perfectly fine to lie to the public. After all, he has said, 'It's not like I'm talking before a magistrate.' Well, maybe he should talk before a magistrate."

Allan Smith

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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Mon Mar 11, 2019 6:49 am

Fox News

FOREIGN POLICYPublished March 10, 2019 Last Update 11 hrs ago
Bolton says Trump 'pretty disappointed' by reports North Korea is planning new missile test
Andrew O'Reilly By Andrew O'Reilly | Fox News




President Trump’s top national security adviser John Bolton reiterated on Sunday that the White House would be “pretty disappointed” if North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un decided to carry out a new missile test despite the progress made by Washington’s overtures to Pyongyang.

Calling the absence in recent of any missile tests from the so-called hermit kingdom a “positive sign,” Bolton pointed to the high-level talks that took place recently in Vietnam between Trump and Kim as a sign of progress in easing tensions and restoring stability to that part of Asia – despite the talks breaking down.

“As the president said he’d be pretty disappointed if Kim Jong Un went ahead and did something like that,” Bolton said to ABC News’ “This Week.” “The president said repeatedly he feels the absence of nuclear test the absence of ballistic missile launches is a positive sign and he’s used that really as part of his effort to persuade Kim Jong Un that he has to go for what the president called the big deal - complete denuclearization.”

NORTH KOREA REBUILDING ROCKET LAUNCH SITE AFTER FAILED SUMMIT, REPORTS SAY

Bolton would not confirm reports based on commercial satellite imagery that North Korea is making moves, saying he'd rather not go into specifics.

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But he says the U.S. government is watching North Korea "constantly," and that, "Nothing in the proliferation game surprises me anymore."


Bolton’s comments come only days after Trump himself said that he's a "little disappointed" by reports of new activity at a North Korean missile research center and long-range rocket site and that time will tell if U.S. diplomacy with the reclusive country will be successful.

NORTH KOREA AIRS DOCUMENTARY GLORIFYING KIM-TRUMP SUMMIT -- BUT FAILS TO MENTION TALKS COLLAPSED

South Korea's military said it is carefully monitoring North Korean nuclear and missile facilities after the country's spy agency told lawmakers that new activity was detected at a research center where the North is believed to build long-range missiles targeting the U.S. mainland.

Defense Ministry spokeswoman Choi Hyun-soo said the U.S. and South Korean militaries are sharing intelligence over the developments at the North's missile research center in Sanumdong on the outskirts of the capital, Pyongyang, and at a separate long-range rocket site. She did not elaborate on what the developments were.

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Asked if he was disappointed in the new activity, Trump told reporters at the White House that he was "a little disappointed." Then he said time will determine the future of U.S. efforts to get North Korean leader Kim Jong Un to give up his pursuit of nuclear weapons in exchange for relief from sanctions stalling economic growth.

"We'll let you know in about a year," Trump told the reporters.

Trump has favored direct talks with Kim, but the next stage of negotiations is likely to be conducted at lower levels. Trump's envoy to North Korea, Steve Biegun, had lunch Wednesday at the State Department with his counterparts from Japan and South Korea. The South Koreans have proposed semiofficial three-way talks with the United States and North Korea as it works to put nuclear diplomacy back on track.

The Associated Press contributed to this report
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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Mon Mar 11, 2019 2:48 pm

Warning signs for Trump loom as he unveils budget
Analysis by Stephen Collinson, CNN
Updated 4:34 AM EDT, Mon March 11, 2019


(CNN) Early warning signs are flashing for President Donald Trump on some of his core arguments on immigration, the economy and North Korea that are central to his 2020 re-election message.

Complications on each of those policy areas threaten to undermine the narrative of unprecedented success that the President has weaved around his first two years in office and are driving political debate as the administration unveils its budget on Monday.

A poorer than expected monthly jobs report Friday fed concern that strong economic growth that anchors Trump's best argument for a second term is ebbing -- something that should worry the President since it's a critical reelection metric.


Trump has often claimed that he is presiding over the "greatest economy in the history of our country." But his foundational political promise to eliminate the US trade deficit suffered a blow with new figures showing that the gap between imports and the amount of goods and services that the US sells abroad has grown $100 billion since Trump took office, despite two years of his "America First" tariff policies intended to reinvigorate American manufacturing.

Signs that North Korea could be preparing a missile or satellite launch and its continued expansion of an atomic arsenal undercut the President's claims that his daring outreach to the isolated state has ended its nuclear threat.

And a rise in crossings across the southern border — while playing into Trump's claims of a crisis in the short term, contradict his wider argument that hardline enforcement policies are the best way to manage immigration and suggest his totemic political plan for a border wall may be ignoring the real problem.

Trump appears sensitive to the weak points of his political pitch, and spent the weekend tweeting out glowing testimonials about the economy from allies and accusing journalists of distorting the successes of his presidency.

"Despite the most hostile and corrupt media in the history of American politics, the Trump Administration has accomplished more in its first two years than any other Administration. Judges, biggest Tax & Regulation Cuts, V.A. Choice, Best Economy, Lowest Unemployment & much more!" Trump wrote.

"More people are working today in the United States, 158,000,000, than at any time in our Country's history. That is a Big Deal!"

The good news for Trump is that the election — though it seems increasingly to be on his mind — is 20 months away, and none of the emerging complications are certain to cement themselves in the unpredictable political period ahead. And at their root, presidential elections unfold as a clash between two competing political visions and personalities as much as a contest between rival policy platforms. One of the big questions of the Democratic presidential race is how the eventual nominee will handle the President's willingness to embrace scorched earth campaigning.

Yet the challenges to Trump's re-election message are not happening in a vacuum. He has plenty of other looming political problems as well as he faces an unprecedented multi-front battle with House Democrats who have launched investigations into almost every aspect of Trump's life, political career and business.

The pros and cons of solidifying the base
The way Trump has positioned his presidency — premising his political viability on the fervent support of his base -- means he is insulated to some extent from reversals of fortune. But an eroding re-election argument could also threaten his efforts to win back more moderate voters in swing districts who helped Democrats win the midterm elections last year.

Potential road bumps for Trump's re-election message also help to explain the relish with which Republicans have seized on the growing pains of the new House Democratic majority — giving a glimpse of the searing attacks that will complement the 2020 narrative of Trump success. Many Republican strategists believe that a perceived race to the left by Democrats could give the GOP the best chance of keeping the White House in 2020.

That argument was exemplified by Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney, the chair of the House Republican conference, on NBC's "Meet the Press" on Sunday.


"They've become the party of anti-Semitism, the party of infanticide, the party of socialism. They've passed legislation that's violated the First Amendment, the Second Amendment," Cheney said.

"It's really time for the Democrats -- the leadership in that party to stop it, to stand up and to act worthy, frankly, of the trust the American people have placed in them."

All first term presidents face the conundrum of how to reconcile the expansive promises they made to win office with an accounting of their wins and losses that comes with the quest to keep their jobs.

More Presidents than not have made that leap in the modern era and won the historical validation of a second term. But few candidates made such extravagant claims to win the Oval Office in the first place as Trump did in 2016.

If today's warning signs turn into significant reversals for the President, Republican plans to run in 2020 on a "Peace and Prosperity" message will be compromised. That could lead the President to put the inflammatory rhetoric that he used in the 2018 midterms at the center of his reelection bid.

Economic numbers cause concern
A long run of staggering jobs data that helped take the unemployment rate to the lowest level in half a century got a jolt on Friday with the release of latest monthly jobs figures showing only 20,000 positions were created in February, far below expectations.

Any one bad jobs report could be an anomaly. And the economy is largely healthy following a strong run since the Great Recession more than a decade or so across the Obama and Trump presidencies and wages have recently been rising at last.

But any sign that the economic engine has peaked could be spell bad news for a President running for reelection, even if any slowing of the pace is relative.

There have been other recent warning signs for the economy. The Atlanta Federal Reserve Board estimate for first quarter growth is just 0.5%. The Conference Board is estimating growth of 2.2% for the second half of 2019. Annual growth for 2018 fell just short of Trump's 3% target and according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis quarterly growth figures have been on the decline for the last three quarters, possibly reflecting the fading stimulatory influence of the GOP tax cuts.

Figures released by the Census Bureau last week showed the trade deficit at a 10-year high in 2018, up $69 billion.

The jump came despite Trump's crusade to revive American manufacturing and reduce dependence on imports which formed a crucial part of his winning 2016 election message. The data put even more pressure on the President to extract a victory from trade talks with China that are currently believed to be in the final stages - though Beijing has in recent days signaled that there's no rush to hold a signing summit at Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida by the end of this month, as the President himself suggested.

The White House's own budget estimates are far more rosy than those of independent forecasters. In Trump's new budget to be unveiled on Monday, the administration predicts 3.2% annual growth his year, 3.1% growth in 2020, and 3% GDP expansion the following year, the Wall Street Journal reported.

Trump's failure to reach a deal with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at their second summit in Vietnam last month dealt a blow to the President's most important foreign policy venture. The White House has rejected criticism of the lack of progress at the two meetings by arguing that the halt to North Korean nuclear and missile tests has been an important victory in itself.

But warnings by analysts based on satellite images that Pyongyang could be preparing to launch a missile or space rocket soon, threatened to undermine even that narrative of limited success.

Trump said last week that he would be "very disappointed if that were happening," while stressing the report was very early assessment.

The restoration work at the launch site could be just a negotiating ploy by Kim after the failure of the summit and just the latest round of decades-long brinkmanship by the North Koreans. But it does show the perils in investing so much political and electoral capital in a diplomatic initiative with the unpredictable North Koreans.

There are also challenges looming for Trump on another signature issue -- immigration.

Customs and Border Protection warned last week that more than 76,000 people were caught crossing the southern border illegally or without proper papers in February -- the highest such number for any February in the last 12 years.

The administration used the figures to argue that the immigration crisis that Trump has proclaimed in an effort to win support for his border wall is getting worse. But critics argue that his fixation on a wall misses the point that the real problem is in a system overwhelmed by asylum claims made at ports of entry.

Trump, however, signaled that his border wall will be a pillar of his political strategy going forward, despite his failure to wring funding for the barrier out of Congress -- an impasse that prompted him to declare a national emergency on immigration.

The White House will ask Congress for $8.6 billion for the wall in the new budget, sources told CNN, prompting a quick response from Democrats at the start of a new showdown over immigration, following last year's government shutdown drama.

"Congress refused to fund his wall and he was forced to admit defeat and reopen the government. The same thing will repeat itself if he tries this again. We hope he learned his lesson," House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Democratic Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer said in a joint statement Sunday.

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