New food preservation methods and the rise of food sensitivities

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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby tentative » Sat Sep 03, 2016 3:06 am

One Liner wrote:Peter Parker became Spiderman after he was bitten by a radioactive spider and so does that mean Tentative will become Brocciliman after eating some radioactive Broccoli?


Every day you're exposed to gamma rays, x rays, all coming from the sun. Are you a gamma man?
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby One Liner » Sat Sep 03, 2016 3:12 am

tentative wrote:
One Liner wrote:Peter Parker became Spiderman after he was bitten by a radioactive spider and so does that mean Tentative will become Brocciliman after eating some radioactive Broccoli?


Every day you're exposed to gamma rays, x rays, all coming from the sun. Are you a gamma man?

That would make me Sunman not gamma man!
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby MagsJ » Fri Oct 14, 2016 2:57 am

Dabbling in processed produce is not doing me any favours, but I tried.. gotta keep testing the situation every so often...

...usually with these: 8-[

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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby MagsJ » Fri Oct 14, 2016 11:49 am

MagsJ wrote:https://actions.sumofus.org/a/eu-protect-our-food-safety/?akid=23392.7676008.Tv-SOv&rd=1&source=fwd&t=1

The EU took control of our food industry a long time ago.. about 2011 to be precise, and in that time 1000s have been hospitalised and started suffering intolerances to foods they were fine with before this date.

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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby Kriswest » Sun Oct 16, 2016 11:16 am

I think we also need to look at sanitizers and over sanitizing. Have you seen the commercials that have folks spraying their counters with a product , wipe the counter then prepare food on that counter? No thought of chemical residue. Then you have the over cleaning , disinfecting,, just how is our immune systems supposed to work when a critical infection occurs if it has been weakened by too little use? People seem to think the immune system is just for germs and viruses, it is not , it should work for certain chemical invasion and amounts.
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby MagsJ » Mon Oct 17, 2016 4:39 am

An over-sensitivity to chemicals can be debilitating in this modern age, as they are everywhere.. we are surrounded, or is that.. they've got us surrounded?
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby Kriswest » Mon Oct 17, 2016 10:26 am

I think it is both. I have a dear friend that sanitizes everything around her. She then wonders why her kids catch every cold ,flue and passable illness that comes around. If a known brand name comes out with a cleaner she gets it due to trust of the name.
We can trace the trust in brand name back to our animal herd/pack instincts. Markets exploit those subconscious instincts. We all trust our favorite brands,,, mine,, Anheuser Busch :)
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby MagsJ » Sat Nov 26, 2016 8:39 pm

UPDATE:

After my second Chronic Fatigue clinic (in the Infectious Diseases clinic, no less)

To be continued...
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby MagsJ » Mon Nov 28, 2016 4:39 am

Naviaux looked at 612 different metabolites, which are intermediate substances such as glucose produced by cells as they break down larger molecules and produce energy. They found that 80 percent of the metabolites were lower in those with CFS. They also found what they described as “abnormalities” in 20 of the metabolic pathways.

All this suggests that the metabolism of people with CFS is markedly slowed down.

The researchers said it appears to be similar to the “dauer state” in nematode worms when they are faced with starvation, overcrowding or other toxic environments. The dauer state involves a massive slowdown of the metabolism — an ability that has been of great interest to researchers for years because it is adaptive and is essentially a “non-aging” state when no cell death occurs. Cynthia Kenyon, a University of California at San Francisco scientist who now works for Google’s Calico start-up, gained fame for doubling the life span of a worm by altering a single gene that regulates the dauer state.

When it comes to CFS, this theory appears to explain some of the mysteries of the condition, such as why many people seem to come down with it after a trigger event such as an infection or exposure to chemicals.

In a Q&A to the CFS community, Naviaux described this theory of humans having a cell-danger response in more depth: “Historical changes in the seasonal availability of calories, microbial pathogens, water stress and other environmental stresses have ensured that we all have inherited hundreds to thousands of genes that our ancestors used to survive all of these conditions.”


When faced with adversity, cells go into defensive mode, he explained. “In most cases, this strategy is effective and normal metabolism is restored after a few days or weeks of illness, and recovery is complete after a few weeks or months.” But with CFS, it’s that possible the body got “stuck” in that state.

He said that although he does not believe that CFS is actually hibernation and although humans do not, in fact, hibernate, he said the “metabolic signature” is similar to that of animals in hibernation.

Stanford Professor Ronald Davis called the work — if it can be replicated and validated — a “game-changer” for people with CFS. For the first time, it presents a possible biomarker for diagnosing the condition and provides a target for possible treatments.

“What they found is that there may be an ancient pathway, and maybe in humans it’s not working very well. Or maybe people have gotten themselves too far down into the state and can’t get back out,” Davis said in an interview.

If that were the case, he explained, curing people of CFS may be akin to waking the body up. Davis said it’s possible that the treatment may not be anything radical; it might involve putting the body back in balance with the right mix of diet and supplements.

But even Davis cautioned that however alluring the paper’s implications are, “it is only a hypothesis.”

Davis, a professor of biochemistry and genetics, who was not involved in the original study, is collaborating with other scientists on a larger study to try to replicate the PNAS findings.

I can assure Davis that the answer is not a simple case of the right diet and supplements, or I would be better by now, but although that simple treatment does alleviate most of the symptoms it does not alleviate the actual fatigue.
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby Uccisore » Mon Nov 28, 2016 6:24 am

MagsJ wrote:I was talking to a fellow local Conservative doctor friend of mine yesterday about my sulphur remedy to help counteract my additive-induced gastrointestinal intestinal (GI) ailments, and he revealed that studies have shown that by the time the Japanese reach 3rd generation residency their cancer rates rise to that of the country they are residing in compared to their own very low rate.


Here's what it looks like in a Japanese super market.

http://3phc7m2it2w72rh1242t6tp2.wpengin ... rket02.jpg
http://images.dannychoo.com/cgm/images/ ... 1dfe99.jpg
https://i.ytimg.com/vi/ribCkYM9L9w/maxresdefault.jpg

Is there some reason why you think this food is not loaded with the exact same quantities of the exact same preservatives? They are a tiny island importing almost everything they eat, just like you are. Were you imagining that Japanese people buy their food in open-stall markets on the street corner, all hand picked by Japanese farmers fresh that morning? They are a civilized country, they get their food out of plastic bags on a shelf same as everybody. If anything, whatever high-tech methods of food-preservation the UK is using, the Japanese probably had it 10 years before you did. We got MSG from them, for example, and asian food is absolutely loaded with MSG despite various scares and warnings about it in the West.
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby MagsJ » Wed Nov 30, 2016 11:46 pm

That's what it also looks like in a St Lucian supermarket.. doesn't mean that's all we eat daily.. we don't.

Last month we had a televised cancer awareness campaign called Stand Up To Cancer, where the new stats of one in two Brits now being diagnosed with cancer were released, and that the new much higher figure was mainly due to a modern diet of processed and preserved foods. My chronic fatigue is also caused by these said same chemicals and a toxic environment.

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=stand ... ent=safari

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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby MagsJ » Sun Dec 04, 2016 1:22 am

Not a good day symptom-wise, as I discovered the boundaries of the physical aspects of the syndrome whilst on set standing up for 3.5 hours continuously and then subsequently feeling every muscle in my body eventually aching from the high energy-usage feat.. starting from my lower back, and quickly spreading to my shoulders, neck, jaw, and then to all my limbs. I wasn't cold or tired, but just couldn't hold it together.. or is that hold me together. :-?

Verdict: I guess I'm not as good with gravity as much as a non CF person is.
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby Ultimate Philosophy 1001 » Sun Dec 04, 2016 1:25 am

First of all, stop going outside. That is the place where commoners roam.
You should keep to the indoors, where it's safe, like in the bedroom or kitchen.
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby MagsJ » Sun Dec 04, 2016 11:38 pm

Ultimate Philosophy 1001 wrote:First of all, stop going outside. That is the place where commoners roam.
You should keep to the indoors, where it's safe, like in the bedroom or kitchen.

:lol:

I spend most days in the bedroom.. resting, and in the kitchen.. making fuel for myself, so going outside when I feel the need to is a welcome distraction from a currently mundane existence of rest and fuel.

Going outside is proving to be hazardous more often than not, but why let it turn one into a hermit or a princess in the tower.. like what happens in all good fairy tales. =;
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby Meno_ » Sun Dec 04, 2016 11:52 pm

I really hate introducing an extremely objectionable extreme example of how reality, qua.preservation, and the consumer consciousness regarding food content can be dumbed down, but here it goes.

A
food product, manufactured from human feces had been introduced, I think in it was in Asia, by a process that changed it's commonly associated
qualities into an acceptable looking burger, with the
addition of color, smell, and other additives, in addition to the preservatives.

T
hat this can be done, reaffirms a McDonald case's veracity years ago, when that company started to substitute other sources into it's products, consisting
of meat obtained from other than the usual beef.


The point is, that it has become an uncertainty to assume what the real contents of edibles are, and thus,

unscrupulous food retailer could substitute a variety of meat products, and still get away with it, in spite of federal food administration requirements of ingredient labeling.


It had been a long established Asian practice to eat other meat sources, such as dogs and rats.
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby Uccisore » Mon Dec 05, 2016 12:31 am

MagsJ wrote:That's what it also looks like in a St Lucian supermarket.. doesn't mean that's all we eat daily.. we don't.


I'm trying to figure out why you think the lack of cancer in Japan has anything to do with a lack of preservatives in their diet. I see no evidence that they eat fewer preservatives than the UK or the USA.
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby Ultimate Philosophy 1001 » Mon Dec 05, 2016 4:24 am

MagsJ wrote:
Ultimate Philosophy 1001 wrote:First of all, stop going outside. That is the place where commoners roam.
You should keep to the indoors, where it's safe, like in the bedroom or kitchen.

:lol:

I spend most days in the bedroom.. resting, and in the kitchen.. making fuel for myself, so going outside when I feel the need to is a welcome distraction from a currently mundane existence of rest and fuel.

Going outside is proving to be hazardous more often than not, but why let it turn one into a hermit or a princess in the tower.. like what happens in all good fairy tales. =;


1. princesses are hot 2. a special somepony could be with you in the tower so as not to keep you all alone
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby Ultimate Philosophy 1001 » Mon Dec 05, 2016 4:25 am

Uccisore wrote:
MagsJ wrote:That's what it also looks like in a St Lucian supermarket.. doesn't mean that's all we eat daily.. we don't.


I'm trying to figure out why you think the lack of cancer in Japan has anything to do with a lack of preservatives in their diet. I see no evidence that they eat fewer preservatives than the UK or the USA.


Lack of cancer is because they fight people with plastic swords all day and wear cosplay, keeps their spirits up
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby MagsJ » Mon Dec 05, 2016 12:53 pm

Uccisore wrote:
MagsJ wrote:That's what it also looks like in a St Lucian supermarket.. doesn't mean that's all we eat daily.. we don't.


I'm trying to figure out why you think the lack of cancer in Japan has anything to do with a lack of preservatives in their diet. I see no evidence that they eat fewer preservatives than the UK or the USA.

...because current stats show a direct correlation between the two differing diets of the more natural versus the more unnatural.
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby James S Saint » Mon Dec 05, 2016 5:38 pm

MagsJ wrote:Because of preservatives on all our food the word 'stale' will soon become obsolete and its meaning have to be explained to kids all across the land... a packet of biscuits or crisps never gets that warning smell of staleness like the good ole pre-preservative days.

All fresh produce (fruit, vegetables, and seafood) are now being sprayed with large amounts of dangerous preservatives that results in them looking like perfect plastic specimens of yummy toxic goodness.

Why are there no regulations on their use? and why aren't they listed on the packaging? I think this is a step too far in pulling the wool over our eyes while we fill our bellies on (supposedly) the freshest of foods.

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It is merely "Play with Your Food" .. and for the same reason. Preservation is merely the convenient excuse.
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby MagsJ » Mon Dec 05, 2016 6:10 pm

James S Saint wrote:It is merely "Play with Your Food" .. and for the same reason. Preservation is merely the convenient excuse.

Eating organic unprocessed foods and limiting fast foods, takeouts, and packaged foods is the best way to go... I know it, food standards know it, the medical professionals know it, but yet they still surround us with toxins.

From the recipes you post you seem to eat sensibly enough, but for most it's hard to exercise that sensibility in the face of satiation-evoking produce. A case of mind over matter/thought over instinct.. to prefer the satiating but bad options?
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby Uccisore » Mon Dec 05, 2016 8:19 pm

MagsJ wrote:...because current stats show a direct correlation between the two differing diets of the more natural versus the more unnatural.


Holy shit.

Ok, let me try this one more time.

Considering Japan is a tiny island and has to import almost everything they eat on refrigerated ships just like you.

Considering Japanese people go to grocery stores just like yours,
Considering Japanese people love food additives and preservatives such as MSG and use them even more often than you do,

Considering all of this why do you think Japanese people eat a more 'nautural' diet than the typical Westerner? Are you just making it up? Do you have some stats? Were you picturing Japan looking like a samurai movie you saw where everybody sits on the floor sipping tea and eating unflavored rice? Where is this "Japanese people eat more wholesome foods than we dirty westerners' thing coming from?

Look up some information about Japanese fast food before replying, maybe.
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby MagsJ » Mon Dec 05, 2016 10:08 pm

Uccisore wrote:
MagsJ wrote:...because current stats show a direct correlation between the two differing diets of the more natural versus the more unnatural.
Considering Japan is a tiny island and has to import almost everything they eat on refrigerated ships just like you.

We do? So we (and all other small islands) don't produce our own produce or manufacture our own foods in factories? We do.

We import foods we produce ourselves because of trade deals and obviously not because of need. Rediculous right?
I know that mountainous habitats like the Alps etc. have to import almost everything.. for obvious reasons, but even then a lot of it is fresh produce.. they eat so healthy up there you know.

Considering Japanese people go to grocery stores just like yours,
Considering Japanese people love food additives and preservatives such as MSG and use them even more often than you do,
I think you're thinking of the Chinese? but even Chinese food providers are now advertising their msg and additive free wares to remain profitable in a changing consumer market... they are also renowned for proclaiming how they don't use msg in their own food but keep it all fresh and sell us the cheaply-flavoured option. Bloody cheek huh?

Considering all of this why do you think Japanese people eat a more 'nautural' diet than the typical Westerner? Are you just making it up? Do you have some stats? Were you picturing Japan looking like a samurai movie you saw where everybody sits on the floor sipping tea and eating unflavored rice? Where is this "Japanese people eat more wholesome foods than we dirty westerners' thing coming from?
Because they do...

My Chinese doctor pal who I had that conversation with has the stats and is liaising with his/the Oriental community on health issues and optimisation... he heads a whole district county's NHS somewhere out of London.

Look up some information about Japanese fast food before replying, maybe.
I'll do that now ;)
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby phyllo » Mon Dec 05, 2016 10:27 pm

I don't think that preservatives have been studied, however, the impact of food choices on longevity has been:

People from the Ryukyu Islands (of which Okinawa is the largest) have a life expectancy among the highest in the world,[2] although the male life expectancy rank among Japanese prefectures has plummeted in recent years.[3]

The traditional diet of the islanders contains 30% green and yellow vegetables. Although the traditional Japanese diet usually includes large quantities of rice, the traditional Okinawa diet consists of smaller quantities of rice; instead the staple is the purple-fleshed Okinawan sweet potato. The Okinawan diet has only 30% of the sugar and 15% of the grains of the average Japanese dietary intake.[4]

The traditional diet also includes a tiny amount of fish (less than half a serving per day) and more in the way of soy and other legumes (6% of total caloric intake). Pork is highly valued, yet eaten very rarely. Every part of the pig is eaten, including internal organs.

Between a sample from Okinawa where life expectancies at birth and 65 were the longest in Japan, and a sample from Akita Prefecture where the life expectancies were much shorter, intakes of calcium, iron and vitamins A, B1, B2, and C, and the proportion of energy from proteins and fats were significantly higher in Okinawa than in Akita. Conversely, intakes of carbohydrates and salt were lower in Okinawa than in Akita.[5]

Records from the early part of the 20th century show that Okinawans ate less than 1% of their diet from animals products with no dairy. More animal foods were introduced into the Okinawa diet in the mid to latter part of the 20th century.[citation needed]

The quantity of pork consumption per person a year in Okinawa is larger than that of the Japanese national average. For example, the quantity of pork consumption per person a year in Okinawa in 1979 was 7.9 kg (17 lb) which exceeded by about 50% that of the Japanese national average.[6] However, pork is primarily only eaten at monthly festivals and the daily diet is almost entirely plant based.[7]

The dietary intake of Okinawans compared to other Japanese circa 1950 shows that Okinawans consumed: fewer total calories (1785 vs. 2068), less polyunsaturated fat (4.8% of calories vs. 8%), less rice (154g vs. 328g), significantly less wheat, barley and other grains (38g vs. 153g), less sugars (3g vs. 8g), more legumes (71g vs. 55g), significantly less fish (15g vs. 62g), significantly less meat and poultry (3g vs. 11g), less eggs (1g vs. 7g), less dairy (<1g vs. 8g), much more sweet potatoes (849g vs. 66g), less other potatoes (2g vs. 47g), less fruit (<1g vs. 44g), and no pickled vegetables (0g vs. 42g). [4] In short, the Okinawans circa 1950 ate sweet potatoes for 849 grams of the 1262 grams of food that they consumed, which constituted 69% of their total calories.[4]

An Okinawan reaching 100 years of age has typically had a diet consistently averaging about one calorie per gram of food and has a BMI of 20.4 in early adulthood and middle age.[8]

In addition to their high life expectancy, islanders are noted for their low mortality from cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancers. Wilcox (2007) compared age-adjusted mortality of Okinawans versus Americans and found that, during 1995, an average Okinawan was 8 times less likely to die from coronary heart disease, 7 times less likely to die from prostate cancer, 6.5 times less likely to die from breast cancer, and 2.5 times less likely to die from colon cancer than an average American of the same age.[4]

The traditional Okinawan diet as described above was widely practiced on the islands until about the 1960s. Since then, dietary practices have been shifting towards Western and Japanese patterns, with fat intake rising from about 6% to 27% of total caloric intake and the sweet potato being supplanted with rice and bread.[9] This shifting trend has also coincided with a decrease in longevity, where Okinawans now have a lower life expectancy than the Japanese average.[10]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okinawa_diet
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Re: Food preservation gone wild

Postby MagsJ » Sun Dec 11, 2016 11:15 pm

Every day is different, but not necessarily good or interesting... my younger brother/youngest sibling has expressed the scenario the best when he says it's as if I'm on opium :lol:

...it just means I get wavy easy baby!
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