A Call To Men

This is the place to shave off that long white beard and stop being philosophical; a forum for members to just talk like normal human beings.

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Re: A Call To Men

Postby WendyDarling » Fri Jun 09, 2017 5:27 am

! :evilfun:
I AM OFFICIALLY IN HELL!

I live my philosophy, it's personal to me and people who engage where I live establish an unspoken dynamic, a relationship of sorts, with me and my philosophy.

Cutting folks for sport is a reality for the poor in spirit. I myself only cut the poor in spirit on Tues., Thurs., and every other Sat.
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby Gloominary » Fri Jun 09, 2017 5:36 am

WendyDarling wrote:So you take your pot shots and now you want to philosophize...FUCK OFF!

My apologies.
If you wish to get back to philosophizing, let me know.
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby phyllo » Fri Jun 09, 2017 1:59 pm

Canada 2015

Population : 35,848,600

Homicide victims : 604 ... 429 male, 175 female

Accused of homicide : 525 ... 464 male, 61 female

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2 ... 68-eng.htm

If anyone actually cares.
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby Gloominary » Fri Jun 09, 2017 2:54 pm

Men often provide for their women, financially, and in other ways, sometimes even if they can't or won't bear their children.

You'd be hard pressed to find a woman providing for a man long term just cause she loves him.

Again men can be extreme dark/light.

Perhaps women's biggest vice is just being unexceptional.

If you're really, truly sick and tired of dealing with Dr Jekyll, as it were, cause you had some bad luck/run ins with his twin brother Hyde, you can say bye to Jekyll, but I don't think there's anything objective about it.

Murder is so rare it's hardly worth thinking about or mentioning, unless you're already in a physically abusive relationship, cause men and women who commit minor-medium offences, are more likely to commit major ones.

As for domestic violence, which's of course far more common, there's good data gathered by psychologists and social scientists suggesting women commit violence against men just as much as men women (which we already went over in another thread of yours, and which you already dismissed, cause they're just "surveys", but they're not just surveys, this was research conducted by professionals in treatment centers/institutions for domestic violence), they just don't get charged or convicted of it as much, cause when a woman starts a fight with a man, either he holds back, or when he finally does go off, she receives the brunt of the damage, just on account of him being many times stronger than her, she's also more likely to press charges, cause men are supposed to be 'manly', nobody takes female on male violence seriously, often even the victims themselves, unless they hack off a penis or something, which occasionally happens.
Last edited by Gloominary on Fri Jun 09, 2017 4:00 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby phyllo » Fri Jun 09, 2017 3:09 pm

Men are more aggressive and violent then women.

The percentage of men who commit violent acts is very small.

Contrary to statistical data, Wendy insists that the majority of men are violent. It's an intentional distortion. That's the problem in this thread and with much of feminism.
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby Gloominary » Fri Jun 09, 2017 3:28 pm



A woman has to take some anger management courses because she repeatedly beat and stabbed her boyfriend, she wants her victim to pay for.

I think that about sums it up right there.

If a man did that to a woman, he would've got 5-10 years, and he certainly wouldn't have the audacity to try to make her pay for his anger management courses.

Absolutely absurd...ludicrous.

Notice the giggling and smiles on everyone's faces, except for the judge, who's more in touch with the reality of domestic violence against men, and probably reality in general.

If their roles in this were reversed, people would be just livid, shocked, outraged, in total dismay.

Take a good, hard look into the eyes of Ms Monica Armendariz cause those are the eyes of a cold blooded psychopath.
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby WendyDarling » Fri Jun 09, 2017 7:55 pm

phyllo wrote:Men are more aggressive and violent then women.

The percentage of men who commit violent acts is very small.

Contrary to statistical data, Wendy insists that the majority of men are violent. It's an intentional distortion. That's the problem in this thread and with much of feminism.


What is this small percentage? Why not give the numbers?

Then what is the percentage that conduct criminal activities, let's say who participate in human trafficking's prostitution? Human trafficking is the third most profitable criminal activity following drugs (predominantly male operations) and guns sales (predominantly male enterprises). How many men support prostitution?

Does an act necessarily have to be violent to be depraved? My comments do not strictly pertain to violence as you so fallaciously try to reckon.
I AM OFFICIALLY IN HELL!

I live my philosophy, it's personal to me and people who engage where I live establish an unspoken dynamic, a relationship of sorts, with me and my philosophy.

Cutting folks for sport is a reality for the poor in spirit. I myself only cut the poor in spirit on Tues., Thurs., and every other Sat.
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby WendyDarling » Fri Jun 09, 2017 8:10 pm

phyllo wrote:Canada 2015

Population : 35,848,600

Homicide victims : 604 ... 429 male, 175 female

Accused of homicide : 525 ... 464 male, 61 female

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2 ... 68-eng.htm

If anyone actually cares.


So it's 7.6(male murderers):1(female murderer) A much higher ratio than was suggested earlier in this thread.

In a ten year period in Canada, there are only 4,640 homicidal males in a population of 35,000,000. Only one male killer per every 7,543 people. If you are Canadian, you have probably rubbed shoulders with one of these peaches.

Phyllo, thanks for the info. Keep it coming. :mrgreen:
I AM OFFICIALLY IN HELL!

I live my philosophy, it's personal to me and people who engage where I live establish an unspoken dynamic, a relationship of sorts, with me and my philosophy.

Cutting folks for sport is a reality for the poor in spirit. I myself only cut the poor in spirit on Tues., Thurs., and every other Sat.
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby phyllo » Fri Jun 09, 2017 8:57 pm

So it's 7.6(male murderers):1(female murderer) A much higher ratio than was suggested earlier in this thread.
I already said that men are more aggressive and violent than women. In a particular year, 464 men out of a male population of around 17 million committed a homicide - 1 out of 36,000 approximately. You want to pretend that's enormously damning for all males. :confusion-shrug:
In a ten year period in Canada, there are only 4,640 homicidal males in a population of 35,000,000. Only one male killer per every 7,543 people.
Why don't you distort it even more by expanding it to 50 years instead of only 10?
If you are Canadian, you have probably rubbed shoulders with one of these peaches.
I might have. I know that my wife did through work. But let's see... before they killed someone, they were not killers. After they killed someone, they were soon dead or in jail. I didn't "rub shoulders" with anyone in jail and rubbing shoulders with someone who has not committed a crime does not seem to be problematic. Then there are the killers who got away with it, of course. :-?
Phyllo, thanks for the info. Keep it coming. :mrgreen:
I don't think I will "keep it coming". This kind of distorted discussion just gets on my nerves. I tried to move it in a rational direction but without success.
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby WendyDarling » Fri Jun 09, 2017 9:10 pm

phyllo wrote:I don't think I will "keep it coming". This kind of distorted discussion just gets on my nerves. I tried to move it in a rational direction but without success.


A distorted discussion is one Phyllo makes without answering any pertinent questions relative to the discussion between two individuals who disagree about the nature of man, instead he withdraws from his laid out path of what is rational, rather than participating in a discussion in a truthful or honest manner. Yes, distorted it is.

Does an act necessarily have to be violent to be depraved? My comments do not strictly pertain to violence as you so fallaciously try to reckon.

I already said that men are more aggressive and violent than women.
Just a couple, right?
I AM OFFICIALLY IN HELL!

I live my philosophy, it's personal to me and people who engage where I live establish an unspoken dynamic, a relationship of sorts, with me and my philosophy.

Cutting folks for sport is a reality for the poor in spirit. I myself only cut the poor in spirit on Tues., Thurs., and every other Sat.
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby phyllo » Fri Jun 09, 2017 9:38 pm

A distorted discussion is one Phyllo makes without answering any pertinent questions relative to the discussion between two individuals who disagree about the nature of man, instead he withdraws from his laid out path of what is rational, rather than participating in a discussion in a truthful or honest manner. Yes, distorted it is.
My position is that only a small percentage of men are violent. I provided statistics which show that only a small percentage of men commit homicides. You choose to ignore that and you just repeat your initial assertions.
I think that I have been truthful and honest in what I have said.
Does an act necessarily have to be violent to be depraved? My comments do not strictly pertain to violence as you so fallaciously try to reckon.
I don't know what you mean by depraved because you have not explained it. Do you have any statistics on this depravity?
Just a couple, right?
I don't know what you mean. Does the number of violent men have to be zero? Does the number of violent men have to equal the number of violent women?
:-?
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby WendyDarling » Fri Jun 09, 2017 10:40 pm

phyllo wrote:
A distorted discussion is one Phyllo makes without answering any pertinent questions relative to the discussion between two individuals who disagree about the nature of man, instead he withdraws from his laid out path of what is rational, rather than participating in a discussion in a truthful or honest manner. Yes, distorted it is.
My position is that only a small percentage of men are violent. I provided statistics which show that only a small percentage of men commit homicides. You chose to avoid all the other instances of male perpetrated violence which I've been asking for but I guess those numbers are not rational enough, to your liking.You choose to ignore that and you just repeat your initial assertions.I've asserted way more than you care to recognize and I haven't ignored that the ratio is skewed to be heavier with men as you have.
I think that I have been truthful and honest in what I have said. If avoiding the hard questions is being,
in action, truthful and honest, then we have different ways of being, in action, such.

Does an act necessarily have to be violent to be depraved? My comments do not strictly pertain to violence as you so fallaciously try to reckon.
I don't know what you mean by depraved because you have not explained it. Acts that are illegal and immoral, such as pedophilia, prostitution (plus other sex crimes), slavery. Do you have any statistics on this depravity? What depravity? There are only 20-30 million slaves worldwide to date, 80% female and 50% children.
Just a couple, right?
I don't know what you mean. Does the number of violent men have to be zero? Does the number of violent/Depraved men have to equal the number of violent/Depraved women? That is a great suggestion, equal, let's start there. What's your plan?
:-?
I AM OFFICIALLY IN HELL!

I live my philosophy, it's personal to me and people who engage where I live establish an unspoken dynamic, a relationship of sorts, with me and my philosophy.

Cutting folks for sport is a reality for the poor in spirit. I myself only cut the poor in spirit on Tues., Thurs., and every other Sat.
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby phyllo » Fri Jun 09, 2017 10:56 pm

If avoiding the hard questions is being,
in action, truthful and honest, then we have different ways of being, in action, such.
Let's just leave it there.
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby WendyDarling » Fri Jun 09, 2017 11:10 pm

A distorted discussion is one Phyllo makes without answering any pertinent questions relative to the discussion between two individuals who disagree about the nature of man, instead he withdraws from his laid out path of what is rational, rather than participating in a discussion in a truthful or honest manner.


Either the discussion goes a man's way or no way, I see. Now it's left...to people who have ideas and a spine that isn't crooked.
I AM OFFICIALLY IN HELL!

I live my philosophy, it's personal to me and people who engage where I live establish an unspoken dynamic, a relationship of sorts, with me and my philosophy.

Cutting folks for sport is a reality for the poor in spirit. I myself only cut the poor in spirit on Tues., Thurs., and every other Sat.
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby Gloominary » Fri Jun 09, 2017 11:50 pm

Women are more cowardly, many would rather fuck the crime boss than be one.

I can show you dozens of honest, hardworking guys who have trouble getting laid cause they're broke or short, stocky and bald, show me a crime boss who has trouble getting laid or finding someone to have babies with.
I'm not saying all women have no scruples, some do, but we all know if John Gotti went on POF he'd have hundreds-thousands of women lining up to suck his dick.

Women do less of everything, they commit less crimes, they work less, they're less willing to question authority for good or ill, they're more likely to live unremarkable lives of mediocrity, but this doesn't mean they're ascetics/minimalists, naw they're often just as hedonistic/materialistic or more, statistics I've look at suggest women spend nearly as much money as men, and more money on frivolous things, like clothes, cosmetics and jewelry, and in most cases it's not even their money, where as men are more apt to make investment purchases like real estate the whole family can benefit from.

I don't do drugs or encourage drug use, once in a blue moon I smoke weed socially but that's it, and I discourage drug abuse.
We live in an age where relatively harmless drugs with loads of medicinal properties like marijuana are illegal (althou apparently they're working on decriminalizing/legalizing it), where as highly unnatural and experimental pharmaceutics that're often just as dangerous and addictive as street drugs aren't, I don't expect anyone to respect such hypocritical, self serving drug laws.
Fuck if you haven't broken a couple of laws in your life than I got to question your capacity for independent thought, I mean come on.
We're talking about drug dealing and prostitution (legal to give it away but not sell it), arguably victimless crimes so long as everything's consensual, the word depravity here is highly subjective.
Last edited by Gloominary on Sat Jun 10, 2017 12:33 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby phyllo » Sat Jun 10, 2017 12:11 am

Either the discussion goes a man's way or no way, I see. Now it's left...to people who have ideas and a spine that isn't crooked.
You called me untruthful and dishonest.

Now you shoot another pair of insults my way.

Have a discussion with someone else and leave me out of it, please.
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby WendyDarling » Sat Jun 10, 2017 12:17 am

phyllo wrote:
Either the discussion goes a man's way or no way, I see. Now it's left...to people who have ideas and a spine that isn't crooked.
You called me untruthful and dishonest.

Now you shoot another pair of insults my way.

Have a discussion with someone else and leave me out of it, please.


:greetings-wavegreen: Goodbye!
I AM OFFICIALLY IN HELL!

I live my philosophy, it's personal to me and people who engage where I live establish an unspoken dynamic, a relationship of sorts, with me and my philosophy.

Cutting folks for sport is a reality for the poor in spirit. I myself only cut the poor in spirit on Tues., Thurs., and every other Sat.
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby Gloominary » Sat Jun 10, 2017 12:43 am

Consumerism is sin.
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby WendyDarling » Sat Jun 10, 2017 12:51 am

While I'm trying to discuss facts, figures, and real life/death dilemma's, the men project their ego's into "reality." How can I consider their egos more relevant than the issues at hand? They have no problems with framing reality as they "want" it, rather than it actually is. 20-30 million women and children kept as slaves is not as important as the splash of the comment of John Gotti getting his dick sucked. One man owns all those millions of lives or a scant few. We got no problems because only 450 men kill a year in Canada, okay, if you say so.


Domestic violence is a gendered crime...

Spousal violence has been consistently identified as one of the most common forms of violence against women in Canada.1
The majority of spousal violence victims are women, representing 83% of all victims (2007).2
Women are almost four times more likely than men to be victims of spousal violence (2011)3
More than 6% of married, common-law, same-sex, separated and divorced female spouses in Ontario report experiencing physical/sexual assault by a spousal partner (2009).4
Women experience more serious forms of spousal assault than men…

4 in 10 women victimized by their spouse report being physically injured (42%), more than twice the proportion of male victims (18%) (2009).5
Women are three times more likely to report being beaten, choked, sexually assaulted, or threatened with a gun or knife by their partner or ex-partner (2009).6
Women are more likely to experience multiple victimizations, according to self-reported data (2009).7
Most victims of domestic homicide are female, while most perpetrators are male…
95% of spousal homicide victims in Ontario are female (2011).8
There were 59 female spousal homicide victims in Canada in 2011, in comparison to 7 male victims.9
Of the homicide cases with domestic violence involvement which occurred in Ontario from 2002 to 2009, 80% of victims were women, 12% were children and 8% were men.10
Of the cases reviewed in Ontario’s 2011 Domestic Violence Death Review Committee Report, 88% of spousal homicide perpetrators were male while 89% of victims were female.11
The rate of domestic homicides against women has dropped in Canada…
The rate of homicides against female spouses dropped 46% from 1991 to 2011.12
Domestic homicides are more common in certain relationships…

Women are six times more likely to be killed by an ex-spouse than a current legally married spouse.13 In fact, the period immediately after a separation is the most dangerous for abuse victims.14
About 6 in 10 spousal homicides of women have a history of family violence involving the victim and the accused (2001-2011).15
Many incidents of domestic violence are not reported to police…

Less than one-third (30%) of female spousal violence victims state that the incident was reported to police (2009), down from 36% in 2004.16
Women choose not to report to police for a number of reasons…

Women are six times more likely than men to say the incident was not reported out of fear of their spouse (19% versus 3%) and they are almost twice as likely to say they did not want anyone to find out (44% versus 26%) (2009).17
79% of women who do report claim they are dealing with the situation in another way, while 74% do not report because they consider it a personal matter (2009).18
Certain types of spousal violence are more likely to be reported to police…19
53% of incidents where women are sexually assaulted, and 60% of incidents where women are beaten, choked or have a weapon used against them are reported to police (2009).20
Many victims are victimized multiple times before they report to police (2009).21
A small proportion of female victims obtain a restraining or protection order…

15% of female victims obtain a restraining or protection order; but according to 32% of these women, the terms of the order are breached (2009).22
Age is a risk factor in experiencing domestic violence…

Women aged 15 to 34 with a current or former spouse are about two to three times as likely as their older counterparts to report experiencing spousal victimization (2009).23
Women aged 15 to 24 are most at risk for spousal homicide. From 2001 to 2011, there were 18.8 spousal homicides for every million women aged 15 to 24, 10.3 spousal homicides per million women aged 25 to 34, and 7.5 homicides per million women aged 35 to 44.24
Aboriginal women are at increased risk of experiencing domestic violence…

Aboriginal women are 2.5 times more likely to experience spousal violence than non-Aboriginal women, according to self-reported data (2009).25
Nearly 6 in 10 Aboriginal female spousal violence victims report injury (59%), while just over 4 in 10 non-Aboriginal female victims are injured (41%) (2009).26
At least 4% of female spousal homicide victims are Aboriginal (2001-2011).27
Lesbian and bisexual women are at increased risk of experiencing domestic violence…

Women who self-identify as lesbian or bisexual report violence by a current or previous spouse at three times the rate of heterosexual women (2009).28
Women with an activity limitation are at increased risk of experiencing domestic violence…

Women with an activity limitation, such as a physical or mental condition, report nearly double the rate of spousal violence as those without limitations (2009).29
Education and income levels do not affect the level of risk…

Educational attainment has no bearing on women’s risk of spousal violence (2009).30
Income also has no effect on women’s risk of spousal violence (2009).31
Children are affected by domestic violence…

Children are more likely to witness violence when the spousal victim is female.32
Almost 6 in 10 women with children who were assaulted by spouses said their children heard or saw the violent episode (59%) (2009).33
Many domestic violence victims experience abuse while pregnant…

Over 1 in 10 women report experiencing spousal violence while pregnant (2009). Abuse during pregnancy can negatively impact both maternal health and birth outcomes.34
Women turn to many different sources for support…

8 in 10 women tell family, friends or another source of informal support (2009).35
38% of female victims use social services, such as counsellors, crisis lines, community centres, shelters, women's centres, and support groups (2009).36
Many women rely on women’s shelters to escape domestic violence…

More than two-thirds of violent incidents against women are committed in private residences, such as the victim and/or offender's home (69%) (2011).37
In 2009/2010, there were almost 31,000 admissions of women and children to the 171 shelters in Ontario that provided services for abused women.38
A one-day snapshot survey found 3,459 residents in Ontario shelters offering services to abused women. 54% of these residents were women, while 46% were dependent children. 74% of women were there primarily because of abuse (2010).39
Women attempt to leave an abusive relationship a number of times, before finally severing ties…

The average woman will make up to five attempts to leave her abuser before ending the relationship permanently.40
The social and economic costs of domestic violence against women are high…

Spousal violence has psychological, physical, social and economic impacts for victims, their families and society.41
Female victims of spousal violence are seven times more likely than male victims to be fearful, three times more likely to be depressed or anxious, and twice as likely to be angry (2009).42
The financial and economic costs of spousal violence for society are higher for women in all categories. This includes both tangible and intangible costs (such as the impact on work productivity).43
It is estimated that the total cost of spousal violence against women in Canada is $4.8 billion over a one year period (2009).44
1Status of Women Canada. (2013). Measuring Violence Against Women: Statistical Trends – Key Findings – Intimate Partner Violence and Spousal Violence. Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) Forum of Ministers Responsible for the Status of Women. Retrieved on October 23, 2013.

2Statistics Canada. (2009). Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 5.

3Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 20.

4Statistics Canada. (2011). Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 9.

5Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 82.

6Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 26.

7Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 8.

8Statistics Canada. (2011). Table 1: Victims of spousal homicide, by gender of victim and province/territory, 2002-2011. Retrieved on July 11, 2013. Retrieved on request from Statistics Canada.

9Statistics Canada. (2011). Table 1: Victims of spousal homicide, by gender of victim and province/territory, 2002-2011. Retrieved on July 11, 2013. Retrieved on request from Statistics Canada.

10Domestic Violence Death Review Committee. (2012). 2011 Annual Report of the Domestic Violence Death Review Committee. Toronto, ON: Office of the Chief Coroner, Pg. 5.

11Domestic Violence Death Review Committee. (2012). 2011 Annual Report of the Domestic Violence Death Review Committee. Toronto, ON: Office of the Chief Coroner, Pg. iii.

12Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 20.

13Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 57.

14Domestic Violence Death Review Committee. (2008). Sixth Annual Annual Report of the Domestic Violence Death Review Committee. Toronto, ON: Office of the Chief Coroner, Pg. 29.

15Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 21.

16Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 10.

17Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 98.

18Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 98.

19Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 10.

20Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 10.

21Statistics Canada. (2011). Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 12.

22Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 99.

23Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 58.

24Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 56.

25Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 19.

26Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 19.

27Statistics Canada. (2013). Table 2.2 Victims of homicide, by sex of the victim, accused relationship to victim, and Aboriginal identity, Canada, 2001-2011. Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Homicide Survey. Retrieved on October 24, 2013. Retrieved from http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2 ... -2-eng.htm.

28Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 59.

29Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 60.

30Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 60.

31Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 60.

32Statistics Canada. (2012). Family violence in Canada: A statistical profile, 2010. Retrieved on October 23, 2013. Pg. 1.

33Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 28.

34Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 28.

35Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 99.

36Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 100.

37Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 14.

38Statistics Canada. (2011). Transition Homes in Canada: National, Provincial and Territorial Fact Sheets 2009/2010. Pg. 17.

39Statistics Canada. (2011). Transition Homes in Canada: National, Provincial and Territorial Fact Sheets 2009/2010. Pg. 18.

40Okun, L. as cited in Yamawaki, N., Ochoa-Shipp, M., Pulsipher C., Harlos, A., and Swindler, S. (2012). Perceptions of Domestic Violence: The Effects of Domestic Violence Myths, Victim’s Relationship with Her Abuser and the Decision to Return to Her Abuser. Journal of Interpersonal Violence 27 (16). Pg. 3196.

41Statistics Canada. (2006). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 13.

42Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 80.

43Status of Women Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. – Key Findings – Intimate Partner Violence and Spousal Violence. Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) Forum of Ministers Responsible for the Status of Women. Retrieved on October 23, 2013.

44Statistics Canada. (2013). Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Industry. Pg. 89.

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So glad that the violence is only 450 weak men who murder.
I AM OFFICIALLY IN HELL!

I live my philosophy, it's personal to me and people who engage where I live establish an unspoken dynamic, a relationship of sorts, with me and my philosophy.

Cutting folks for sport is a reality for the poor in spirit. I myself only cut the poor in spirit on Tues., Thurs., and every other Sat.
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby phyllo » Sat Jun 10, 2017 1:32 am

Seems that women are better off with guys since there is more abuse in lesbian relationships. 8)
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey reports on the lifetime prevalence of rape, physical violence or stalking by an intimate partner, focusing for the first time on victimization by sexual orientation. It finds a victimization prevalence of 43.8 percent for lesbians, making it the second most affected group after bisexual women (61.1 percent), ahead of bisexual men (37.3 percent), heterosexual women (35 percent), heterosexual men (29 percent) and homosexual men (26 percent).[9]

The issue of domestic violence among lesbian couples is highly ignored due to the social construction of gender roles that women are expected to play in society.[3] The social construction of women is characterized as passive, dependent, nurturing, and highly emotional. Due to forms of discrimination, homophobia, and heterosexism, and the belief that heterosexuality is normative within society, domestic violence has been characterized as being between the male perpetrator and the female victim.[4] This contributes to the invisibility of the frequency of domestic violence that constantly takes place within lesbian relationships. Moreover, the fear of reinforcing negative stereotypes has led some community members, activists, and victims to deny the extent of violence among lesbians.[10] Social service agencies are often unwilling to assist lesbian victims of domestic violence.[10] Victims of domestic violence in lesbian relationships are less likely to have the case prosecuted within a legal system.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domestic_ ... ationships
phyllo
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby WendyDarling » Sat Jun 10, 2017 1:49 am

Phyllo,

No more whining or running away. I gave you the out you requested, but instead you now intrude where you did not want to be found. Your name was not mentioned, yet here you are...again. I know, I know...the female made you do it. Either you are honest and stay in this discussion or lie from the sidelines, please...pretty please.
I AM OFFICIALLY IN HELL!

I live my philosophy, it's personal to me and people who engage where I live establish an unspoken dynamic, a relationship of sorts, with me and my philosophy.

Cutting folks for sport is a reality for the poor in spirit. I myself only cut the poor in spirit on Tues., Thurs., and every other Sat.
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WendyDarling
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby phyllo » Sat Jun 10, 2017 2:24 am

There’s something wrong with America’s girls.

As the story of Michelle Carter, an 18-year-old in Massachusetts who encouraged her 18-year-old boyfriend, Conrad Roy, to kill himself — which he did — winds through our media, it’s easy to wonder: What’s happening to young women?

Carter is charged with involuntary manslaughter, though it doesn’t quite seem so involuntary. She pressured Roy with texts saying “when are you going to do it?” even when he tried to change the subject and, when he got cold feet and exited his car filling with the carbon monoxide that would kill him, she texted him to “get back in.”

Male violence is still the more serious phenomenon, but female violence is on the rise in a big way. A study by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration in 2010 found that one in four girls aged 12 to 17 have been involved in violent behavior. Yet we focus on boy violence, on the way they play rough-and-tumble with toy guns or on the so-called “rape culture” on campuses as if they’re the only ones involved in heinous crimes.

Another shocking story of the last year was that of the two girls in Waukesha, Wis., who attempted to stab their friend to death and left her for dead in the woods. Found by a cyclist as her organs were failing, the girl somehow survived. The initial story blamed “the Internet” — the perpetrators told police they’d committed the crime to please “Slender Man,” an Internet legend who apparently required a pre-teen girl as a sacrifice.

This story unraveled, however, as the girls acknowledged they knew Slender Man to be fake, yet tried to kill their friend anyway. All three girls were 12 years old at the time of the attack.

At the same time, the female prison population is soaring. The Netflix show “Orange Is the New Black” brought the female penitentiary to mainstream America.

While it portrayed some violence and less-than-savory interactions, the prison on the show is a federal correctional facility, often referred to as “camp,” and is modeled after the one where people like Leona Helmsley and singer Lauryn Hill did their bids and where “Real Housewives of New Jersey” star Theresa Giudice is currently serving time.

In other words, it won’t be where girls like Aniah Ferguson, 16, and the ringleader in an attack on another teen girl at a Brooklyn McDonald’s earlier this year, will end up. Ferguson had several prior arrests, including for punching her own grandmother, before she was arrested for beating a 15-year-old girl to a bloody pulp.

The fact is, by the time prison is on the horizon, just as for their male counterparts, it’s too late to save these girls. There’s an undefined cultural shift leading to this kind of violent behavior and while we’re frequently addressing it in boys, we seem to be ignoring it, or glossing over it, in girls.

There’s a lot of talk about the “mean girl,” the high school bully who tells you where to sit in the cafeteria and what day to wear purple. But the conversation rarely extends to the preteens plotting their friends’ murders.

In a Washington Post column last November, Patricia O’Brien, an associate professor at the Jane Addams College of Social Work at the University of Illinois at Chicago, argued that perhaps the solution to a 646 percent increase in female incarceration rates in the past 30 years would be to stop putting women in prison at all, ever, for any reason.

Pulling at the heartstrings while noting that women are more likely to have children depend on them than men do, O’Brien writes that “the case for closing women’s prisons is built on the experiences of formerly incarcerated women and activists who recognize that women who are mothers and community builders can find their way forward when they [are] respected and supported.”

Respect and support for women are worthy goals, but we need to fix our child violence crisis before they become imprisoned adults. The goal has to be teaching the girls respect — for themselves, their communities and the law, with the same lessons about their actions and the repercussions that we give the boys.

Girls need to be taught the same lessons in accountability as boys. The earlier we start doing so, the better.

http://nypost.com/2015/09/07/americas-y ... e-problem/
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby phyllo » Sat Jun 10, 2017 2:59 am

In April, 17-year-old Ta'Jae Warner was jumped and beaten to death while walking with her 11-year-old brother to the store in the daylight-filled streets of Brooklyn. More recently, in Delaware, 16-year-old Amy Joyner sustained a head injury that claimed her life after a high school bathroom brawl that was supposedly over a boy.

While these two cases ended in worst-case scenarios, where victims lost their lives to violence, tons of other stories of black girls brutally beating other black girls have gone viral after videos of the attacks spread like wildfire online.

In Joyner's case, the girls involved in her death immediately took to social media to brag.



Another even outlined the gruesome details of Amy's death, saying she and two other girls "stabbed her with pencils" and "kicked her while she was down" on social media.

The attacks were also video-recorded on cellphones by bystanders who did nothing but watch. Though the footage has been removed online due to pending investigations (one teen has been charged with homicide; the other two face misdemeanor conspiracy charges), a screenshot of Joyner's struggle is still circulating on social media. It was taken just moments before she lost her life.

This display of insensitivity shouldn't come as a surprise to those who are familiar with such online fight videos. Hundreds of other fight videos featuring black girls have been uploaded into the digital world, capturing the deeply embedded violence found in parts of the black community.

Among the most popular websites that share these videos is the infamous WorldStarHipHop.com, where a search for the words "girl fight" renders 42 pages of results, most of which feature black girls fighting. MediaTakeOut is another enabler.



Requests for comment were sent to both WorldStarHipHop and MediaTakeOut as to why they allow and promote images of black violence. WorldStarHipHop did not return our request, and Fred Mwangaguhunga, founder and CEO of MediaTakeOut, which posted the screenshot taken moments before Joyner's death, issued the following:

As the number once source for African American content within the web, we have an obligation to bring awareness & cover all issues that affect our community. Our hope is that by highlighting the consequences of these unfortunate events, we can encourage consciousness within our viewers. We should never have another tragedy like Amy's again.

As of this posting, MediaTakeOut's post titled "16-Year-Old DELAWARE High School Girl . . Is BEATEN TO DEATH By Gang Of Bullies . . . And They CAPTURED THE BEATING ON VIDEO!! (Shock PICS Inside)" is still up.

Yiasiah Lucas, a black woman raised in an urban environment who has witnessed plenty of intraracial violence between black girls, both on and offline, explained the general appeal of these videos: "It's entertainment and I feel like us, as human beings, we sort of like violence," she told the Daily Dot. "I think we get a little pumped up when we see violence. I don't think we want anyone to get hurt or killed — I don't think it's that extreme. But there is something about violence that intrigues humans."

While it's one thing to be a voyeur and not turn away when a video starts playing in your feed, it's another to contribute. And it is also on social media where many of these conflicts spiral out of control, with bullying get worse online even before things turn violent in real time.

"We have had so many girls that literally had to leave school, because of Snapchat," Tracie Berry-McGhee, a licensed therapist and founder of the nonprofit "SistaKeeper" — a mentoring wellness program that works with black girls — told the Daily Dot. "Whatever is written on there is gone in 24 hours, so it is impossible to monitor. So girls will say, 'I wish you would die' or 'Go kill yourself,' and then it is gone; there is no proof. They know nothing can be done."

She further explained that Facebook and apps like Kik are used as unmonitored spaces where students embarrass one another and potentially instigate violence.

"Right now, there is something popular amongst teens called 'Set out Sunday,'" Berry-McGhee said, where bullies set up victims under the premise of befriending them and then post mean things about them on Facebook for everyone to see. "For example, a girl can pretend to like another girl and ask to hang out with her at her house, but then she will use the public 'Set out Sunday' Facebook page to say her house was dirty, or some other degrading comment. So some of these kids are checking every week to see when it will be their turn to be bullied. You can only imagine how anxiety-inducing that would feel."

Though adolescence is a terrible, turbulent time for many kids, black children are much more likely to be both victims of and witnesses to violence than white children, according to the National Center for Victims of Crime. "Black youth are three times more likely to be victims of reported child abuse or neglect, three times more likely to be victims of robbery, and five times more likely to be victims of homicide," according to the center's site. "In fact, homicide is the leading cause of death among African-American youth ages 15 to 24."

Yet, despite these alarming rates, black youth are still unlikely to find support from police or governmental institutions when threatened with violence, nor do they know where to turn or how to deal with the emotional and psychological impacts of such traumatization. "Ratting out" and seeking help is often stigmatized as a sign of weakness, and without encouragement or easy access to counseling, violence has a spiraling effect, sweeping young black children into a whirlwind of more violence.

The National Center for Victims of Crime initiative further explains:

Youth who are victimized during the complicated transitional period of adolescence may experience serious disruption of their developmental processes. These effects are worsened when youth perceive institutions as unwilling or unable to help or protect them, and adults' failure to intercede confirms youth victims' sense that they must cope with an unsafe environment by themselves and leads to delayed reporting and recovery for youth.

And to exacerbate these matters, black girls are faced with their own unique struggles that make it difficult to even begin to address the perpetuation of violence, both on and offline. In media, positive black female role models are frequently overshadowed by the prevalence of angry/violent portrayals of black women who are quick-tempered and use fighting as a way to resolve conflict, especially in reality shows like the Love and Hip Hop franchise, The Real Housewives of Atlanta, and Love Thy Sister. We have become accustomed to not only seeing these angry images of black women, but to also being entertained by them.

"I think, number one, we have to look at our communities and our home environments where girls grow up not particularly caring or loving themselves," Berry-McGhee said. "These young ladies are hurting, and when they look at television, radio, social media, they are not seeing positive images of themselves. They think reality television is true. And when you see African-American women throwing drinks at one another and calling them friends ... These girls are not watching age-appropriate television, and often times the parents are watching with them and validating what they see."

And what these girls are watching in online spaces and on TV has grave impacts on their psychological and emotional development. A 2007 study in the Journal of Adolescent Health, called "The Impact of Electronic Media Violence: Scientific Theory and Research," suggested that the short-term and long-term effects of exposure to media violence are disastrous. In the short-term, such violent media can prime subjects to display violence and also mimic what they watch. In the long-term, subjects can become desensitized to violent imagery, normalizing violence as a part of their fundamental understanding of the world.

Another factor that feeds this cycle of violence: racism, even at its most covert.

Kelly Wickham Hurst, a middle school guidance counselor, understands far too well the roles that cultural insensitivities and racism play in perpetuating black girl-on-girl assaults.

"There are very well-intentioned white people who work in the system who commit acts of racism every day," she said. "In many schools, the bulk of the teachers are Caucasian and they don't really know how to deal with black children or understand their backgrounds.

"I don't think Brown v. Board of Education did us any favors," she continued. "I think what it did was force us to go to school in white systems where no one there was forced to change — except to take us in as students."

Berry-McGhee echoed this sentiment. She thinks many white teachers may need to be better trained to deal with the unique circumstances of black children.

"For example, there may be a girl who comes in and her hair covered — with a hood or a scarf or something — because it hasn't been finished; maybe it is half-braided," Berry-McGhee told the Daily Dot. "A teacher who has no cultural sensitivity, no experience dealing with this kind of situation, will demand the girl remove whatever is covering her hair, not thinking how much that may embarrass her. When the student refuses to remove the object, the teacher may possibly escalate the situation unnecessarily, and then when a fight breaks out, we will pretend the girl was just out of control."

Furthermore, many members of the black community are afraid to address the rampant violence among young black girls out of fear that they will perpetuate stereotypes of black inferiority and savagery.

"It adds to the negative portrayal of black women in society," Lucas explained. "If you look at the comments section on any videos where black girls are fighting, you will always see comments by white people like, 'Look at them fighting like animals.'"

http://theweek.com/articles/629137/soci ... l-violence
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby WendyDarling » Sat Jun 10, 2017 3:01 am

Men do suffer from domestic violence, it does happen and that video was certainly one horrific example of such violence perpetrated by a woman that man loved, completely abominable. She deserves to be behind bars as she is. Men need to report these instances and I do think that women are becoming more aggressive, more lost.

However, many laws have been changed or enacted to protect women...and men and children from abuse and that is thanks to feminism.

There are a lot of domestic violence videos available on YouTube, it would take forever to watch all of what's online and be way too depressing as well. It's an epidemic that continues to ravage more women and children than men.

I AM OFFICIALLY IN HELL!

I live my philosophy, it's personal to me and people who engage where I live establish an unspoken dynamic, a relationship of sorts, with me and my philosophy.

Cutting folks for sport is a reality for the poor in spirit. I myself only cut the poor in spirit on Tues., Thurs., and every other Sat.
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Re: A Call To Men

Postby WendyDarling » Sat Jun 10, 2017 3:12 am

phyllo wrote:Seems that women are better off with guys since there is more abuse in lesbian relationships. 8)
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey reports on the lifetime prevalence of rape, physical violence or stalking by an intimate partner, focusing for the first time on victimization by sexual orientation. It finds a victimization prevalence of 43.8 percent for lesbians, making it the second most affected group after bisexual women (61.1 percent), ahead of bisexual men (37.3 percent), heterosexual women (35 percent), heterosexual men (29 percent) and homosexual men (26 percent).[9]

The issue of domestic violence among lesbian couples is highly ignored due to the social construction of gender roles that women are expected to play in society.[3] The social construction of women is characterized as passive, dependent, nurturing, and highly emotional. Due to forms of discrimination, homophobia, and heterosexism, and the belief that heterosexuality is normative within society, domestic violence has been characterized as being between the male perpetrator and the female victim.[4] This contributes to the invisibility of the frequency of domestic violence that constantly takes place within lesbian relationships. Moreover, the fear of reinforcing negative stereotypes has led some community members, activists, and victims to deny the extent of violence among lesbians.[10] Social service agencies are often unwilling to assist lesbian victims of domestic violence.[10] Victims of domestic violence in lesbian relationships are less likely to have the case prosecuted within a legal system.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domestic_ ... ationships


Lesbians make up 5% of the population, men 45-50%. Nice glib try Phyllo. Keep the info coming though so I can make comments on it since you seem to have nothing to add.

I am aware of this type of gender enactment in the form of physicality made by the more butch type of females who exude more of a masculine persona. Also, many of these abusive relationship have ties to the military in forms of service by the perpetrators.
I AM OFFICIALLY IN HELL!

I live my philosophy, it's personal to me and people who engage where I live establish an unspoken dynamic, a relationship of sorts, with me and my philosophy.

Cutting folks for sport is a reality for the poor in spirit. I myself only cut the poor in spirit on Tues., Thurs., and every other Sat.
User avatar
WendyDarling
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