Absolute Randomness

This is the place to shave off that long white beard and stop being philosophical; a forum for members to just talk like normal human beings.

Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby promethean75 » Sun Jan 12, 2020 2:37 pm

Yes. Few (primarily) herbivores in the animal kingdom command such fearless pride and confidence, and fewer still will display such swagger.

The very definition of 'cool'.

This is their world. We're just tourists.
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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby promethean75 » Sun Jan 12, 2020 4:58 pm

scene: sunday night (bloody sunday), january 22 1905, andrey turgenev writes in his journal:

"today was a disaster. my heart was wrenched from my breast as i watched so many of my comrades die. i told them we weren't prepared but still i could not convince them. Nicholas II had forced them into such squalor and poverty that they had nothing to lose. they were literally starving and would not wait any longer, i knew, but i could foresee the massacre to come. what we lacked was organization and numbers, and against his army we wouldn't stand a chance. and though we lost the day i maintain my hope that the future will be ours. my faith lies in the young and promising leader vladimir lenin, a comrade of considerable intelligence and charisma who has risen among our ranks. i will keep my spirit and not let today's events discourage me."

andrey turgenev, alone in his cottage, closes his journal and prepares his supper.
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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby promethean75 » Mon Jan 13, 2020 2:50 am

On norwegian socialism, useless complaining, and morihei ueshiba...

https://vocaroo.com/kMHoMgFOYzV
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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby MagsJ » Mon Jan 13, 2020 3:25 am

promethean75 wrote:andrey turgenev, alone in his cottage, closes his journal and prepares his supper.

Lololol.. the salt and pepper were a nice touch. =D>
The possibility of anything we can imagine existing is endless and infinite

I haven't got the time to spend the time reading something that is telling me nothing, as I will never be able to get back that time, and I may need it for something at some point in time. Wait! What?

--MagsJ
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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby promethean75 » Mon Jan 13, 2020 4:48 am

I CANNOT believe I just heard some news anchor say about Neil Peart 'he's up there with rock drummers like John Bonham and Keith Moon'.

https://vocaroo.com/161ENpD3tG9
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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby promethean75 » Tue Jan 14, 2020 12:43 am

Meanwhile, at a website far far away....

Rosa 'the kraken' Lichtenstein wrote:[...]...that a particular theory of language has dominated 'Western' (and, indeed, 'Eastern') thought for over two thousand years. This approach sees the primary role of discourse (in fact, in many cases, its only role) as representational, and hence that it acts solely as a vehicle for thought (or, perhaps, an outer expression of 'inner thought'), not as a means of communication. In fact, if discourse was ever (reluctantly) seen as a means of communication, it was then often regarded as a vehicle for communicating thoughts already arrived at independently of, and prior to, social interaction.



In fact, language was originally considered -- by priests, theologians and philosophers, for example -- to be a gift of the 'gods', and thus a 'hot line' the use of which would allow them to re-present their 'thoughts' to humanity -- or, to be more accurate, re-presented only to a 'chosen' few. Alternatively, the latter could think 'divine' thoughts on behalf of the masses, which thoughts were often expressed in esoteric, allegorical, poetic or figurative language, who would then deliver these profundities to 'expectant humanity' as if they had come from on high.



Indeed, as Umberto Eco points out (in relation to the 'western', Christian tradition):



"God spoke before all things, and said, 'Let there be light.' In this way, he created both heaven and earth; for with the utterance of the divine word, 'there was light'.... Thus Creation itself arose through an act of speech; it is only by giving things their names that he created them and gave them their ontological status....



"In Genesis..., the Lord speaks to man for the first time.... We are not told in what language God spoke to Adam. Tradition has pictured it as a sort of language of interior illumination, in which God...expresses himself....



"...Clearly we are here in the presence of a motif, common to other religions and mythologies -- that of the nomothete, the name-giver, the creator of language." [Eco (1997), pp.7-8. Bold emphases and links added.]



Language was therefore a vehicle for the "inner illumination" of the 'soul'; a hot-line to 'God'. Unsurprisingly, the theories concocted by countless generations of ruling-class hacks turned out to be those that -- 'coincidentally', you understand -- almost invariably rationalised or 'justified' the status quo, alongside obscene inequality and systematic oppression.



These ancient fantasies also suggested that not only had the heavens been called into existence by the use of language, but language -- The 'Word of God' -- now ran the entire show. And yet, the exclusive medium in which much of this fable was expressed wasn't just any old language, and it certainly wasn't the vernacular. It was a highly specialised language full of freshly minted, jargonised expressions, invented by these theorists in order to re-present the 'divine' order and 'god's' thoughts to humanity. Ordinary words based on the lives and experience of ordinary working people were plainly inadequate. As the late Professor Havelock pointed out:



"As long as preserved communication remained oral, the environment could be described or explained only in the guise of stories which represent it as the work of agents: that is gods. Hesiod takes the step of trying to unify those stories into one great story, which becomes a cosmic theogony. A great series of matings and births of gods is narrated to symbolise the present experience of the sky, earth, seas, mountains, storms, rivers, and stars. His poem is the first attempt we have in a style in which the resources of documentation have begun to intrude upon the manner of an acoustic composition. But his account is still a narrative of events, of 'beginnings,' that is, 'births,' as his critics the Presocratics were to put it. From the standpoint of a sophisticated philosophical language, such as was available to Aristotle, what was lacking was a set of commonplace but abstract terms which by their interrelations could describe the physical world conceptually; terms such as space, void, matter, body, element, motion, immobility, change, permanence, substratum, quantity, quality, dimension, unit, and the like. Aside altogether from the coinage of abstract nouns, the conceptual task also required the elimination of verbs of doing and acting and happening, one may even say, of living and dying, in favour of a syntax which states permanent relationships between conceptual terms systematically. For this purpose the required linguistic mechanism was furnished by the timeless present of the verb to be -- the copula of analytic statement.



"The history of early philosophy is usually written under the assumption that this kind of vocabulary was already available to the first Greek thinkers. The evidence of their own language is that it was not. They had to initiate the process of inventing it.... Nevertheless, the Presocratics could not invent such language by an act of novel creation. They had to begin with what was available, namely, the vocabulary and syntax of orally memorised speech, in particular the language of Homer and Hesiod. What they proceeded to do was to take the language of the mythos and manipulate it, forcing its terms into fresh syntactical relationships which had the constant effect of stretching and extending their application, giving them a cosmic rather than a particular reference." [Havelock (1983), pp.13-14, 21. Bold emphases added; quotation marks altered to conform with the conventions adopted at this site. Spelling modified to agree with UK English. Links added; some paragraphs merged.]



Subsequently, in the work of Plato, Aristotle and Plotinus, for example, language was transformed into a device that enabled the 'soul' to converse with itself (via "inner speech"), which prompted these and subsequent philosophers into concluding they had ready access to 'divine', eternal verities, derived from thought alone.1 As noted above, 'languageless thought' was regarded as the means by which the 'select few' could draw close to 'Being'/'God' -- an idea that helped motivate the 'problem' of the relation between the 'Knower' and the 'Known', which later re-surfaced as the main problematic of German Idealism -- which subsequently reappeared in an 'inverted' form in 'Materialist Dialectics' as a key component in the alleged relationship between 'Thought' and 'Being'.1a



In the work of early modern (and increasingly secular) theorists, 'consciousness' has come to refer to what supposedly goes on in an inner, private arena, where the bourgeois 'Mind'/'Soul' -- operating now as a socially-isolated 'atom' --, could represent to itself not just these 'divine' verities, but also any 'information' ('impressions', 'images', 'ideas') the senses sent its way -- in many cases with the former shaping the latter. Peter Hacker fills in the details:



"Although the ancients raised questions about our own knowledge of our perceptions and thought, and introduced the idea of an inner sense, they had no word for consciousness and they did not characterize the mind as the domain of consciousness. Aristotelians conceived of the mind as the array of powers that distinguish humanity from the rest of animate nature.... What is distinctive of humanity, and what characterizes the mind, are the powers of the intellect -- of reason and of the rational will. Knowledge of these powers is not obtained by 'consciousness' or 'introspection', but by observing their exercise in our engagement with the world around us. The medievals followed suit. They too lacked a term for consciousness, but they likewise indulged in reflection upon 'inner senses', arguably -- in the wake of Avicenna's distinguishing five such senses -- to excess.



"Descartes's innovations with regard to the uses in philosophy of the Latin 'conscientia' (which had not hitherto signified consciousness at all) as well as the French 'la conscience', were of capital importance. For it was he who introduced the novel use of the term into the philosophical vocabulary. He invoked it in order to account for the indubitable and infallible knowledge which he held we have of our Thoughts (cogitationes) or Operations of the Mind. His reflections reshaped our conception of the mind and redrew the boundaries of the mental. Thenceforth consciousness, as opposed to intellect and sensitivity to reasons in thought, affection, intention and action, was treated as the mark of the mental and the characteristic of the mind.



"The expression 'conscius' and the French word 'conscient', and the attendant conception of consciousness, caught on among his correspondents and successors (Gassendi, Arnauld, La Forge, Malebranche). So too 'consciousness' and 'conscious' caught on among English philosophers, churchmen and scientists (Stanley, Tillotson, Cumberland, Cudworth and Boyle). But it is to Locke that we must turn to find the most influential, fully fledged, philosophical conception of consciousness that, with some variations, was to dominate reflection on the nature of the human mind thenceforth. This conception was to come to its baroque culmination in the writings of Kant. In the Lockean tradition, consciousness is an inner sense. Unlike outer sense, it is indubitable and infallible. It is limited in its objects to the operations of the mind. The objects of consciousness are private to each subject of experience and thought. What one is thus conscious of in inner sense constitutes the subjective foundation of empirical knowledge. Because consciousness is thus confined to one's own mental operations, it was conceived to be equivalent to self-consciousness -- understood as knowledge of how things are 'subjectively' (privately, in foro interno ('inside the individual concerned' -- RL)) with one's self.



"The ordinary use of the English noun 'consciousness' and its cognates originates in the early seventeenth century, a mere three or four decades prior to the Cartesian introduction of a novel sense of 'conscius' and 'conscient' into philosophy in the 1640s. So it evolved side by side with the philosophical use -- but, on the whole, in fortunate independence of it. For the ordinary use developed, over the next three centuries, into a valuable if specialized instrument in our toolkit of cognitive concepts. By contrast, as we shall see, philosophical usage sank deeper and deeper into quagmires of confusion and incoherence from which it has not recovered to this day." [Hacker (2013a), pp.11-12. (See also the more detailed comments on the history of this word: pp.15-19, as well as this paper by Hacker. (This links to a PDF.)) Italic emphases in the original; links added.]



"The term 'consciousness' is a latecomer upon the stage of Western philosophy. The ancients had no such term. Sunoida, like its Latin equivalent conscio, meant the same as 'I know together with' or 'I am privy, with another, to the knowledge that'. If the prefixes sun and cum functioned merely as intensifiers, then the verbs meant simply 'I know well' or 'I am well aware that'. Although the ancients did indeed raise questions about the nature of our knowledge of our own perceptions and thought, and introduced the idea of an inner sense, they did not characterize the mind as the domain of consciousness. Aristotelians conceived of the mind as the array of powers that distinguish humanity from the rest of animate nature. The powers of self-movement, of perception and sensation, and of appetite, are shared with other animals. What is distinctive of humanity, and what characterizes the mind, are the powers of the intellect -- of reason, and of the rational will. Knowledge of these powers is not obtained by consciousness or introspection, but by observation of their exercise in our engagement with the world around us. The mediaevals followed suit. They likewise lacked any term for consciousness, although they too indulged in reflections upon 'inner senses' -- in the wake of Avicenna's distinguishing five such senses, arguably to excess....


"The English word 'conscious' is recorded by the OED [Oxford English Dictionary -- RL] as first occurring at the beginning of the seventeenth century, when, like the Latin 'conscius', it signified sharing knowledge with another or being witness to something. In its early forms, it occurred in phrases such as 'being conscious to another' and ‘being conscious to something'. But sharing knowledge rapidly evolved into being privy to unshared knowledge, either about others or about oneself. So 'to be conscious to' quickly became a cousin to the much older expression 'to be aware of'. The form 'to be conscious to' was slowly displaced by 'to be conscious of'. 'To be conscious of something', of course, signified a form of knowledge. So like 'to know', 'to be conscious of something' is a factive verb -- one cannot be conscious of something that does not exist or is not the case. Outside philosophy, there was no suggestion whatsoever that the objects of consciousness, i.e. that of which one can be said to be conscious, are restricted to one's own mental operations. One could be said to be conscious of what one perceived, or of some feature of what one perceived, of one's own or another's deeds -- both good and evil, of a pertinent fact (the lateness of the hour, the merits of a case) and of one's own or another's virtues or vices, and so forth. It was not until the middle of the nineteenth century that 'consciousness' came to be used to signify wakefulness as opposed to being unconscious. Thenceforth one could speak of losing and regaining consciousness. The common or garden notions of self-consciousness, i.e. either being excessively aware of one's appearance (a usage now lapsed) or being embarrassingly aware that others are looking at one, is nineteenth-century vintage. Being class conscious, money-conscious, or safety-conscious are twentieth century coinage....



"The expression 'conscious' was introduced into philosophy, almost inadvertently, by Descartes. It does not appear in his work prior to the Meditations (1641), and even there it occurs just once. In the Third Meditation, it occurs not in relation to knowledge of one's 'thoughts' or 'operations of the mind', but in relation to awareness of the power to perpetuate one's own existence (AT VII, 49; CSM II, 34). It was only under pressure from objectors to this single remark that Descartes was forced, in his 'Replies to Objections', to elaborate his ideas on knowing our own 'thoughts'. His developed position in the Principles and late correspondence was unstable. The expression and attendant conception, caught on among Descartes' contemporaries and successors (Gassendi, Arnauld, La Forge) and among English philosophers (Stanley, Tillotson, Cumberland and Cudworth). But it is to Locke, almost fifty years later, that we must turn to find the most influential, fully fledged, philosophical concept of consciousness that was to dominate reflection on the nature of the human mind thenceforth. The attendant conception was to come to its baroque culmination (or perhaps nadir of confusion) in the writings of Kant and the post-Kantian German idealists.


"Descartes used the terms conscientia, conscius, and conscio to signify a form of knowledge, namely the alleged direct knowledge we have of what is passing in our minds. What we are conscious of (which I shall call the 'objects of consciousness') are Thoughts, a term which Descartes stretched to include thinking (as ordinarily understood), sensing or perceiving (shorn of their factive force), understanding, wanting, and imagining. Because he held thinking to be the sole essential attribute of immaterial substances, he claimed that we are thinking all the time, waking or sleeping. He also held that consciousness of operations of the mind is indubitable and infallible. He argued that the mind is, as it were, transparent. For, he wrote (AT VII, 214; CSM II, 150), it is self-evident that one cannot have a thought and not be conscious of it -- although the thoughts we have in sleep are immediately forgotten." [Hacker (2012), pp.1-3. (This links to a PDF.) Italic emphases in the original, links added. "AT" refers to one of the standard collections of Descartes's work, edited by Charles Adam and Paul Tannery; "CSM" refers to the more recent edition by John Cottingham, Robert Stoothoff, Dugald Murdoch, and Anthony Kenny. Even though the second passage of Hacker's repeats parts of the first, I have quoted it since it adds significant extra details.]



[I have said much more about the Christian-Platonic-Cartesian Paradigm, making slightly different points in Note 1.]



In general, this family of theories held that this 'information' was processed by 'the mind' employing one or more of the following principles: (a) A set of 'innate' ideas, b) Privately applied rules or habits of 'the mind', (c) A collection of (arbitrarily chosen) 'categories' or 'concepts', which were supposedly implanted in us by 'god', or the presence of which was necessitated by our psychological, 'logical', or, more recently, our genetic and evolutionary make-up.
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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby promethean75 » Tue Jan 14, 2020 4:43 pm

0:41 - 0:48

Just look at that face. Precious.

https://youtu.be/Vt_Gi5ocXVo
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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby promethean75 » Tue Jan 14, 2020 5:36 pm

That's it. I'm getting a great horned owl and I'm gonna name him/her 'minerva'. Well for obvious reasons.

Go to 1:00 and watch how he looks at the dude when the dude tries to take his toy. Lol.

https://youtu.be/vBgKKPPsZ9U
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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby promethean75 » Tue Jan 14, 2020 5:54 pm

Next up: shadow hunter

https://youtu.be/fdoDN99jxHI
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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby promethean75 » Tue Jan 14, 2020 6:00 pm

grand finale: the melted owl

https://youtu.be/dPvwleZPQTQ
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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby promethean75 » Tue Jan 14, 2020 8:30 pm

OMG I almost forgot. Guess who's birfday it is today? Kay I'll give you a hint in the form of a riddle:

This one who walks among you
Will mingle but not mix
In threads he hits licks
Makes chumps out of John Wicks
And swings like a big.... thinker.

*waits*
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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby promethean75 » Tue Jan 14, 2020 8:35 pm

... and he wants a great horned owl for a birthday present.
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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby promethean75 » Tue Jan 14, 2020 9:24 pm

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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby promethean75 » Wed Jan 15, 2020 2:53 am

How could you not want one?

https://youtu.be/GhbQ_OJ8MzA
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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby promethean75 » Wed Jan 15, 2020 2:59 am

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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby Pedro I Rengel » Wed Jan 15, 2020 3:17 am

Yo happy birthday motherfucker!
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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby MagsJ » Wed Jan 15, 2020 3:22 am

Lololol.. yeah, they cute.. but don’t get me started on those geese. [-(
The possibility of anything we can imagine existing is endless and infinite

I haven't got the time to spend the time reading something that is telling me nothing, as I will never be able to get back that time, and I may need it for something at some point in time. Wait! What?

--MagsJ
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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby promethean75 » Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:23 pm

rosa 'the party crasher' lichtenstein wrote:On the other hand, if understanding is made manifest by our competent use of language (alongside associated skills and performances) in a public domain, then an appeal to the intercession of "inner speech" to facilitate it, is unnecessary. Indeed, we don't need to anthropomorphise the brain/'mind'/CNS in this way in order to account for our ability to comprehend one another --, since, of course, there is nothing here that needs accounting for.48



The contrary supposition (i.e., that "inner speech" is essential to understanding) is clearly motivated by a powerful set of ideological illusions, chief among which is the belief that unless something is internalised it can't be understood. This by-now-familiar representational view of language and thought is itself based on the idea that it is mere proximity and internal immediacy that renders "inner speech" directly comprehensible to 'consciousness'. That is, it is the inner manipulation of signs and/or symbols (or their physical or psychical correlates) that constitutes understanding, as opposed to 'outer' communication, behavioural competence and social interaction that does. [On this, see below.]



It is also plain that the traditional picture is itself motivated by yet another set of inappropriate nominalisations and reifications of everyday words -- terms that ordinarily express or exhibit our intellectual and linguistic skills, dispositions and states --, a wrong turn that is compounded by their consequent fetishisation.48a



This traditional approach runs along the following (highly truncated) lines: if 'consciousness', 'language' and 'the understanding' are in fact objects or inner processes (and who can possibly doubt that if they have been given names?), or if they are based on these inner objects and processes, a successful theory (especially if it hopes to be 'scientific' and 'philosophical') must account for their inter-relationship.



However, these 'inner entities' have been conjured into existence by the simple expedient of 'naming' them -- which plainly divides and then separates one from another by objectifying, or reifying, them. Because of such moves these separated 'items' now require a 'theory' to re-connect them! Enter Traditional Philosophy and contemporary Cognitive 'Science'.49



But, this is an attempt to find a 'solution' to a bogus problem. Bogus, because the original distinction between these 'internal objects and processes' was motivated by these inappropriate linguistic moves, and nothing more. Attempt because it is impossible to complete the task this pseudo-problem presents those who invented it, or who now try to wrestle with it, since these entities (i.e., 'consciousness', 'language' and 'the understanding', etc.) are figments of the imagination, motivated by the reification and fetishisation of a handful of concepts.50



As any competent user of the language may readily confirm, this isn't how we already use words like "understand", "think" and "to be aware"; we don't employ them to name inner objects and processes. This is revealed by the further fact that we ordinarily decide, for instance, whether someone has understood what is said to them by an appeal to outer criteria. We don't examine the contents of their heads, or try to access their mental imagery. If this is what we mean by "understanding" (that is, if we apply this word successfully on the basis of outer criteria like this, which cri8teria are associated with publicly checkable performances, skills and achievements (as opposed to hidden and mysterious inner 'events'), then the employment of this word to depict what goes on inside our heads will be seen for what it is -- the Platonic-Christian-Cartesian Paradigm in all but name.



Naturally, this last set of bald assertions needs some defending -- but, fortunately, no much.



Undeniably, language has developed and grown as result of the material interaction between human beings and the world. Manifestly, this didn't take place as a result of the occult deliberations of an obscure, inner ethereal entity (i.e., "consciousness", or "thought") beloved of tradition. That observation isn't just consonant with a Marxist view of the social nature of language and human beings, it agrees with everyday linguistic and social practice. When studying the social and intellectual development of humanity, for example, archaeologists and historians would make no progress at all if they attempted to consider the machinations of these mythical inner objects and processes.51 What they do (what we all do), of course, is examine the conditions under which our ancestors lived -- the social and political forms they assumed --, their struggles, writings, inter-relationships, means of production, relations of exploitation, etc., etc. In addition to this, the study of artefacts, inscriptions, buildings, coffins, possessions, property relations, class structures, and so on, would add detail, where necessary. This is what constitutes an HM study of the past (and of the present, for that matter). If language is intimately connected with humanity's social development, then a materialist account of discourse and comprehension need take no heed of these hidden, 'inner objects and processes', even if sense could be made of them.



'Inner processes' like these aren't hidden from us because they are especially well-concealed, difficult to locate or inspect; there is in fact nothing there to study -- or, rather, it makes no sense to suppose there is -- and this is so for reasons given above (which are further elaborated upon below).



The contrary supposition that there are such occult (i.e., hidden) goings-on is often motivated by yet another inappropriate use of language, itself a result of the influence of an archaic tradition, the aforementioned Platonic-Christian-Cartesian Paradigm -- and nothing more. Apart from a crass misuse of words, allied with this mystical tradition, there is nothing to suggest that such 'inner processes' exist. Indeed, that is why it was asserted above that these mysterious 'inner objects and processes' are immaterial (in both senses of that word); they couldn't feature in a materialist account of anything since they don't exist (or rather, once again, no sense can be made of the supposition that they do). In our practice we take no heed of them; our material use of language and our shared behaviour show that such 'objects and processes' are chimerical.51a



The social nature of language implies that individuals aren't free to attach their own private meaning to words so that they become the meaning of those words -- least of all a meaning that runs counter to the open, public application of terms like "understand", "thought", and "to be aware". This is partly because whatever personal gloss might be put on any such words -- as is the case with other social products, such as commodities --, their meaning or 'value' is fixed by outer, not 'inner', material conditions. [This topic will be examined in more detail presently.]



Hence, despite his disclaimers, Voloshinov's theory not only depends on just such a reification of language, it relies on an anthropomorphisation of the mind or brain. That is, it depends on a inner projection of outer social categories onto the aforementioned fictional, 'inner couch potato' -- i.e., onto what is, in all but name, the Cartesian Soul.
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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby promethean75 » Thu Jan 16, 2020 2:11 pm

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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby promethean75 » Fri Jan 17, 2020 2:11 pm

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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby MagsJ » Fri Jan 17, 2020 2:29 pm

Billie Eilish to sing the new James Bond theme
By Mark Savage
BBC music reporter

Pop star Billie Eilish has recorded the title track for the new James Bond film, No Time To Die.
The US singer, who turned 18 last month, is the youngest artist in history to write and record a theme for the franchise.
"It feels crazy to be a part of this in every way," said the star, who called the assignment "a huge honour".
"James Bond is the coolest film franchise ever to exist. I'm still in shock."
The last two Bond themes, Adele's Skyfall and Sam Smith's Writing's On The Wall (from Spectre), have both won an Oscar.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-51112742
The possibility of anything we can imagine existing is endless and infinite

I haven't got the time to spend the time reading something that is telling me nothing, as I will never be able to get back that time, and I may need it for something at some point in time. Wait! What?

--MagsJ
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Re: Absolute Randomness

Postby MagsJ » Fri Jan 17, 2020 2:40 pm

MagsJ wrote:Billie Eilish to sing the new James Bond theme
By Mark Savage
BBC music reporter

Pop star Billie Eilish has recorded the title track for the new James Bond film, No Time To Die.
The US singer, who turned 18 last month, is the youngest artist in history to write and record a theme for the franchise.
"It feels crazy to be a part of this in every way," said the star, who called the assignment "a huge honour".
"James Bond is the coolest film franchise ever to exist. I'm still in shock."
The last two Bond themes, Adele's Skyfall and Sam Smith's Writing's On The Wall (from Spectre), have both won an Oscar.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-51112742

Prom’s favourite artiste.. I’m sure you’re ecstatic over this news?

:lol:
The possibility of anything we can imagine existing is endless and infinite

I haven't got the time to spend the time reading something that is telling me nothing, as I will never be able to get back that time, and I may need it for something at some point in time. Wait! What?

--MagsJ
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