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Peacetime Social Psyche.

PostPosted: Sun Jan 12, 2020 10:14 am
by Tab
I was watching some junk on netflix, and in one scene a warrior character was staring thoughtfully at a painting. The painting was a classical warfare themed piece, guy on horse, bloodied sabre, dead and routed enemies, the usual. It struck me that if I had been standing beside the warrior character, both of us looking at the painting, my experience of it would have been vastly different from theirs because I have zero experience of war.

Then I realised that we've been, at least in the west, members of probably the first generations who have lived their entire lives without first-hand experience of war, in all of human history. At least if you take ww2 as the last war that embraced an entire generation, rather than only parts of it.

Anyway, was wondering what you thought about this, and how you think this situation has made our generation(s) different from our parent's/grandparent's.

Re: Peacetime Social Psyche.

PostPosted: Sun Jan 12, 2020 12:41 pm
by surreptitious75
Experience of war is multi faceted and any conflict can severely affect national well being regardless of how big or small it is
We are now more critical of empire but whether that is a consequence of relative peace or political correctness I cannot say

It would be interesting to ask all the men here who have never actually fought for their country if they would if it was required of them
I would not because I am a born coward but had I been born at another time I might have a different answer though I cannot be certain

Do men become more feminised when their generation is not exposed to war - I have absolutely no idea but either way the answer would not surprise me
There are many ways to assert ones masculinity without having to go to war but to lay down your life for your country is the greatest thing a man can do

Re: Peacetime Social Psyche.

PostPosted: Sun Jan 12, 2020 12:47 pm
by Tab
Let's not throw concepts of femininity and masculinity into this. They do not exist as absolutes. There are behaviour patterns and physical traits that society associates with the archetype 'male', and behaviour patterns and physical traits that society associates with the archetype 'female'.

You might not think that's an important qualification of terms, but wow, it so is, believe me. :D You would not believe the millions of words thrown about in the past concerning this topic.

I was thinking more of a missing point of commonality of experience in peacetime societies. War is a great leveller - rich people go to war, poor people go to war. Men and women are affected, those of all religions too.

Re: Peacetime Social Psyche.

PostPosted: Sun Jan 12, 2020 12:51 pm
by Berkley Babes
My myer-briggs personality type is the mediator/ peace maker. So I have a strong bias for harmony. That said, I feel that I am surrounded by a majority of people who use peacetime to prepare the next war. Since everything changes, is their excuse.

Anyway, I don't debate much on ILP because I seek agreement, while other personality types seek to sharpen their debate skills above all else.

The ironic part of any of this, the video game I've devoted the most hours to is Battlefield 4. So basically, in concept, I still support the idea of war. I guess I should have faith in the way things are.

Re: Peacetime Social Psyche.

PostPosted: Sun Jan 12, 2020 12:59 pm
by Tab
Yeah, video games are a thing. My kids play them, I used to play a lot too. All of them involve sanitized violence to a degree, small or large.

If play is the mirror of the psyche, then war/peace is only a question of graphic resolution and granularity of experience lol.

Re: Peacetime Social Psyche.

PostPosted: Sun Jan 12, 2020 1:02 pm
by surreptitious75
There is commonality in peacetime but it is not as vital as in wartime
Obvious things such as religion and sport which bring people together

Re: Peacetime Social Psyche.

PostPosted: Sun Jan 12, 2020 1:14 pm
by Berkley Babes
surreptitious75 wrote:There is commonality in peacetime but it is not as vital as in wartime
Obvious things such as religion and sport which bring people together


Sport does bring people together, but jets fly over the stadium before the game starts. So the question is unite for what, towards what, an enemy? Maybe that's what you were suggesting, that people are more patriotic during wartime. The flags come out on doorsteps more.

Concentrations of power, city by city, then countrywide, invisible borders to be enforced, ect.

Then of course, the need for secret keeping, against other nations, which is really about keeping one's own citizens in the dark.

Right about now the only thing that would unite us in worldly peace would be a universal enemy of the alien variety.

Re: Peacetime Social Psyche.

PostPosted: Sun Jan 12, 2020 1:19 pm
by Berkley Babes
Tab wrote:Yeah, video games are a thing. My kids play them, I used to play a lot too. All of them involve sanitized violence to a degree, small or large.

If play is the mirror of the psyche, then war/peace is only a question of graphic resolution and granularity of experience lol.


haha, yeah, of pixelated punches . . .

Re: Peacetime Social Psyche.

PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 4:57 am
by Fixed Cross
Tab wrote:I was watching some junk on netflix, and in one scene a warrior character was staring thoughtfully at a painting. The painting was a classical warfare themed piece, guy on horse, bloodied sabre, dead and routed enemies, the usual. It struck me that if I had been standing beside the warrior character, both of us looking at the painting, my experience of it would have been vastly different from theirs because I have zero experience of war.

Then I realised that we've been, at least in the west, members of probably the first generations who have lived their entire lives without first-hand experience of war, in all of human history. At least if you take ww2 as the last war that embraced an entire generation, rather than only parts of it.

Anyway, was wondering what you thought about this, and how you think this situation has made our generation(s) different from our parent's/grandparent's.

It made pansies, freeloaders, god-damned COMMUNISTS - oh wait of course the Commies won us WWII.

No but seriously. For generations post-war in families who have been enveloped entirely in war, horrors and possibly victories and all, it is not possible to not be aware of the vicious nature of he human species and have some deep anxiety over this. I see it split people into two groups; ultra-pacifists, and ultra-vigilants. I count myself among the latter.

Re: Peacetime Social Psyche.

PostPosted: Tue Jan 21, 2020 8:49 pm
by Fixed Cross
Tab wrote:I was watching some junk on netflix, and in one scene a warrior character was staring thoughtfully at a painting. The painting was a classical warfare themed piece, guy on horse, bloodied sabre, dead and routed enemies, the usual. It struck me that if I had been standing beside the warrior character, both of us looking at the painting, my experience of it would have been vastly different from theirs because I have zero experience of war.

Then I realised that we've been, at least in the west, members of probably the first generations who have lived their entire lives without first-hand experience of war, in all of human history. At least if you take ww2 as the last war that embraced an entire generation, rather than only parts of it.

Anyway, was wondering what you thought about this, and how you think this situation has made our generation(s) different from our parent's/grandparent's.

Actually theres war whenever you open your eyes and step out of your comfort zone these days. Wars are fought nowadays with very interesting means, too. Its dangerous out there if you're awake. And it gets weird quick once you approach the sources of danger.

But then, the most dangerous thing to do is to turn your back on danger.
And that, probably, is the "Peacetime Social Psyche". The neurotic back-turning masses, consumed with fear of their own shadows.