Ethical Truths

This is the main board for discussing philosophy - formal, informal and in between.

Ethical Truths

Postby thinkdr » Sat May 02, 2020 11:03 pm

Since Ethics is about creating value in human interactions, if I can be of service I am creating some value and therefore I am being ethical. If I can boost you up in some way, such as giving you a well0deserved compliment, I am being ethical.
It is not enough just to avoid doing harm or even being kind and thoughtful: if one is to be ethical one is to grow (in a moral sense.) That means one is to add to his/her repertoire new moral principles, and is to live by them. One then expresses these standards in action. One’s conduct reflects them. Thus an ethical person throughout life alters his conduct in a moral direction. Thus one becomes increasingly-more ethical with the passage of time.

An ethical person lives responsibly, purposefully, has individuality. He or she respects life, at least mammalian life. S/he has humility, and balance; balances work-life and leisure. S/he believes human life is significant, and works on or supports social policies that reduce predation, and extreme inequality. S/he believes that no one is superior or inferior to anyone else. No one is entitled to rule over others, nor to manipulate them, nor exploit them.

An ethical individual is considerate of others and avoids being too self-centered, avoids being selfish. When one is ethical he observes moderation. Thus he neither overvalues nor under-values: he will be careful to neither over-do nor under-do, yet he will get something worthwhile done. He hates violence and war and will decline to take part in such activity. {The one exception is if his country has been invaded.} He loves justice and kindness.

In contrast, those with sick minds may have a personality disorder and show it by being narcissistic, authoritarian, lying compulsively – all of which are a matter of degree. They, and others, may conduct themselves as predators. They can behave in an evil manner. There are a small percentage of the population who are madmen, are fiendish or diabolical.

Children, before they mature, can be vengeful: they, as if by reflex, impose on others the lowest form of justice: retribution. They will do this on one who they believe has wronged them (done them some harm.) They say to themselves: “You harm me, I throw you a punch or a slap. Or maybe I’ll just push you away.” Retaliation is often seen in 4-to-8 year olds who have not been raised to be ethical. Once a kid matures, develops human-relationship skills, he or she seeks a higher form of justice when wronged. Forms of justice that are higher -- more-valuable than mere tit-for-tat -- are redemption, reconciliation, negotiation, and creative sentencing by a wise judge.

Your comments are most welcome! Any thoughts on these topics?
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
thinkdr
Thinker
 
Posts: 786
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 7:05 pm

Re: Ethical Truths

Postby thinkdr » Sun May 10, 2020 7:23 am

Understanding the Ethical Perspective

The following consists of two excerpts from the book, Ethics: A College Course. https://currikicdn.s3-us-west-2.amazona ... 482dfe.pdf
The first quotation is from p. 19. The second is from pp. 23-24. The symbols S, E, and I enclosed in parentheses - which you find in the first paragraph below - refer to three dimensions of value explained earlier in the book, as well as in an earlier thread here at the Forum. https://www.ilovephilosophy.com/viewtop ... ons&sid%20
I would like to learn your thinking on the subjects discussed in these quotes.Do you have any responses, any extensions, or any improvements to suggest?

Philosophy encourages us to view things from differing perspectives. When human individuals are the topic, we may view them
(S) anatomically or physiologically;
(E) psychologically or (in groups) sociologically; or
( I ) as radiating with uncountable possibilities, as irreplaceable treasures, as having depths to be explored and cultivated, as possessing untapped gifts and talents, that is, we may view them from an ethical perspective. This Intrinsic viewpoint - very similar, if not equivalent, to what Husserl spoke of as Intentionality - when it is focused on a person is the Ethics viewpoint. Chapter Six will examine the implications of this.
These definitions of value and of good (based, as they are, in set theory) and the models derived from them permit scientists in this field to then analyze where value controversies arise, have arisen, and will arise. They can now objectively categorize, analyze -- and even synthesize -- with regard to values, value-judgments, ratings, prizings, and the usage of value terms. By means of value science "ought-judgments," as you will see later in Chapter Eight, have been logically reduced to "is-judgments, to matters of fact, and have thus been made objective. There we will also cite falsifiable experiments pertaining to Ethics, by Greene, Gintis and others.


Robert S.Hartman believed that every science originates from a basic concept which is fertile: it has what Carl Hempl has spoken of as empirical import. To Hartman that basic concept is an -axiom. An "axiom," in this sense, is a basic premiss which is part formal and part empirical. Thus it qualifies as the sort of concept which Kant would call a synthetic a priori.
For Physics the axiom is the concept of energy transformation. Historically Physics really began by conceiving of motion, not as Aristotle spoke of movement or change, namely, “potentiality becoming actuality”; but rather, as Galileo’s great brilliance of thought conceived of it. He proposed that motion (or rate of speed) consists of “space units divided by time units.” [ r = D/t ] With that breakthrough The Science of Mechanics – the oldest branch of Physics – was founded. Today we write: velocity (directed speed) = s/t and after Newton extended and modified the formula it now reads s = (at2)/2 + kt + C. When generalized this yields F = ma, Newton’s second law of motion. It all started with Galileo’s redefinition of movement. The ‘axiom’ for Chemistry is The Law of Conservation of Energy. It suggested the possibility of setting up chemical equations. They show that mass and volumes are the same both before and after a chemical reaction. This launched a science that was quite new in the early 1700s.
For Biology, we would venture to suggest that the ‘axiom’ is the definition of a living cell. As we pointed out in Chapter Two, the ‘axiom’ for Value Science is the definition of x is a valuable C (where C stands for the concept under which x falls, the category of which it is a case, the class of which it is an element).

The ‘axiom’ for Ethics is “Every person has a self-concept” and a person can get to know himself, to accept himself, to create himself.
One can – if one works on it – differentiate this concept and come to see why s/he is unique and has a special contribution to make. She (or he) can have a purposeful life, one of high quality, one that is quite meaningful. Hence, for Ethics we are postulating that everyone, under normal conditions, at one time or another in life, has a self-concept. That is to say, every individual likely has a name, has a self-image (or Self) and possesses one or more of the features depicted in that self-image.
The study of these self-images, and investigations as to whether and to what degree they correspond to actual features objectively possessed by the individual, is a major part of the discipline the writer chooses to call Ethics.To review, we have argued that true sciences spring from an ‘axiom’. That fertile concept is a seed, so to speak, which has within it the potential of flowering into a full-grown tree. In some cases it is a formula that gives rise to a system that can be applied to reality
.

Your views?
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
thinkdr
Thinker
 
Posts: 786
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 7:05 pm


Return to Philosophy



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users