Why self-respect is a first prerequisite for discovery

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Re: Why self-respect is a first prerequisite for discovery

Postby Fixed Cross » Mon Oct 28, 2019 7:30 pm

surreptitious75 wrote:
Fixed Cross wrote:
If one does not respect oneself one does not respect the standard by which one measures anything else

This would be true where the standard in question can only be measured subjectively or predominantly so
But for objective measurement a certain degree of self respect is not really relevant so is rather arbitrary
For example self respect for the study of an academic subject is nowhere as important as an open mind is

Can one really have an open mind without self-respect?

Maybe.

But without self respect intellectual integrity is not possible, and that is required to do justice to any incoming information.
The strong do what they can, the weak accept what they must.
- Thucydides
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Re: Why self-respect is a first prerequisite for discovery

Postby surreptitious75 » Mon Oct 28, 2019 8:42 pm

The brain may have many individual parts but they work together rather than operate in isolation

The limbic system communicates with the amygdala which is primarily responsible for fear and anxiety
The amygdala is in the reptilian part of the brain so it is very old and primitive compared to other parts

It is also responsible for moral and physical disgust because disgust in any form is based upon fear or anxiety
It would have been a more active region in early homo sapiens because of the evolutionary need for survival
A MIND IS LIKE A PARACHUTE : IT DOES NOT WORK UNLESS IT IS OPEN
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Re: Why self-respect is a first prerequisite for discovery

Postby MagsJ » Mon Oct 28, 2019 9:08 pm

I’m all about da mutual respect, honey.. it’s fundamental, at a certain point in society, upwards.. I’ve seen it in action.. it’s an important aspect in business and politics and social settings.

Once respect has been lost, it’s very hard to gain back.. and near impossible for some, that are so short-sighted that their vision prohibits such necessary formalities to materialise as true.
The possibility of anything we can imagine existing is endless and infinite

I haven't got the time to spend the time reading something that is telling me nothing, as I will never be able to get that time back, and I may need it for something at some point in time. Wait! What?

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Re: Why self-respect is a first prerequisite for discovery

Postby surreptitious75 » Mon Oct 28, 2019 9:16 pm


https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLpXa ... CBQSwi_2e8


Human Behavioural Biology / Professor Robert Sapolsky / Stanford University / Lecture I4 Limbic System

I watched the first of these by chance then just went through all of the 22 that he gave
The first lecture is absolutely amazing and is one of the best ones that I have ever seen
His other single lecture video on shamanism and the biology of religiosity is just as good

A world class education freely available on YouTube to absolutely anyone - the internet as it should be
I intend to watch all of these lectures as many more times until I understand them as much as possible
A MIND IS LIKE A PARACHUTE : IT DOES NOT WORK UNLESS IT IS OPEN
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Re: Why self-respect is a first prerequisite for discovery

Postby Karpel Tunnel » Tue Oct 29, 2019 6:14 pm

surreptitious75 wrote:The brain may have many individual parts but they work together rather than operate in isolation
It can work like that, but we tend tend to try to suppress the limbic system with the neocortex. Different cultures do this more than others. Different amounts of judgment and suppression. I think this is mostly unnecessary.

The limbic system communicates with the amygdala which is primarily responsible for fear and anxiety
The amygdala is part of the limbic system.
The amygdala is in the reptilian part of the brain so it is very old and primitive compared to other parts
The amydala is not in the reptilian brain, but in the limibic system that came with mammals. Though the triune brain theory is controversial these days. But if we are looking at the brain this way, the amygdala is not in the reptilian part of the brain.

It is also responsible for moral and physical disgust because disgust in any form is based upon fear or anxiety
It would have been a more active region in early homo sapiens because of the evolutionary need for survival
Dsigust is regulated by the insular cortex. It is strongly related to the limbic system, but not generally considered part of it.
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Re: Why self-respect is a first prerequisite for discovery

Postby Fixed Cross » Wed Oct 30, 2019 6:11 pm

MagsJ wrote:I’m all about da mutual respect, honey.. it’s fundamental, at a certain point in society, upwards.. I’ve seen it in action.. it’s an important aspect in business and politics and social settings.

Yes, the is essential to building a circuitry of being, a self-valuing consisting of more than one person.
Mutual expressions of valuing is the lifeblood or heartbeat of such an entity.
The Philosophers Clan kept failing because of failure to attain this mechanism between all its members.

Once respect has been lost, it’s very hard to gain back.. and near impossible for some, that are so short-sighted that their vision prohibits such necessary formalities to materialise as true.

Yes. It takes a powerful will to favour strategy over the "right" to dissociate given by insult.
The strong do what they can, the weak accept what they must.
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Re: Why self-respect is a first prerequisite for discovery

Postby Fixed Cross » Wed Oct 30, 2019 6:25 pm

surreptitious75 wrote:[The amygdala] is also responsible for moral and physical disgust because disgust in any form is based upon fear or anxiety

They seem dissimilar to me. Though disgust will cause fear and anxiety, anxiety and fear do not suffice to produce disgust.

It would have been a more active region in early homo sapiens because of the evolutionary need for survival

I wonder about that. It seems hard to live in a city without making a measure of disgust an unspoken precondition underneath any judgment, simply because there are so very many humans with all of them different weaknesses to encounter without any warnings.

Karpel Tunnel wrote:
surreptitious75 wrote:The brain may have many individual parts but they work together rather than operate in isolation
It can work like that, but we tend tend to try to suppress the limbic system with the neocortex. Different cultures do this more than others. Different amounts of judgment and suppression. I think this is mostly unnecessary.

Like in an engine, no single module should in general be working at maximum capacity and none should be not working at all.
It is a balancing act, and because there is no standard for a literally defined perfect homeostasis, it is also an art; once has to create the criteria for ones own sort of balance. A human cant avoid creating its own world based on the kind of cerebral balance it is capable of attaining. Beliefs serve these balances, they are like default setting presets. A lot of subtle considerations hidden behind a name, a button, a trigger.

The limbic system communicates with the amygdala which is primarily responsible for fear and anxiety
The amygdala is part of the limbic system.
The amygdala is in the reptilian part of the brain so it is very old and primitive compared to other parts
The amydala is not in the reptilian brain, but in the limibic system that came with mammals. Though the triune brain theory is controversial these days. But if we are looking at the brain this way, the amygdala is not in the reptilian part of the brain.

What is this controversy about?

It is also responsible for moral and physical disgust because disgust in any form is based upon fear or anxiety
It would have been a more active region in early homo sapiens because of the evolutionary need for survival
Dsigust is regulated by the insular cortex. It is strongly related to the limbic system, but not generally considered part of it.

Interesting. That makes sense - it would be the function of that which cannot be processed in limbic systemic terms.
The strong do what they can, the weak accept what they must.
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Re: Why self-respect is a first prerequisite for discovery

Postby Karpel Tunnel » Wed Nov 06, 2019 3:57 pm

Fixed Cross wrote:
surreptitious75 wrote:[The amygdala] is also responsible for moral and physical disgust because disgust in any form is based upon fear or anxiety

They seem dissimilar to me. Though disgust will cause fear and anxiety, anxiety and fear do not suffice to produce disgust.
yes, disgust is different and I don't think it is based on fear and anxiety, though it is protective. and interestingly conservatives are more likely to feel it. I think it is a reaction to make us turn away from pathogens and things that might carry disease or cause harm. it literally motivates us to turn our heads, squinch up our mouths and nose and back away.

What is this controversy about?
I just don't think he's got a good handle on what the limbic system is and is not.
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Re: Why self-respect is a first prerequisite for discovery

Postby Fixed Cross » Thu Nov 07, 2019 12:45 am

Thats okay. I remember using the term in a rhyme once without knowing what it was.

What are your favourite parts of the brain?
Dont pretend you don't know what I mean.
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Re: Why self-respect is a first prerequisite for discovery

Postby MagsJ » Fri Nov 08, 2019 3:32 am

Fixed Cross wrote:
MagsJ wrote:I’m all about da mutual respect, honey.. it’s fundamental, at a certain point in society, upwards.. I’ve seen it in action.. it’s an important aspect in business and politics and social settings.

Yes, the is essential to building a circuitry of being, a self-valuing consisting of more than one person.
Mutual expressions of valuing is the lifeblood or heartbeat of such an entity.
The Philosophers Clan kept failing because of failure to attain this mechanism between all its members.

Oh really? that’s interesting, but also reflective of the need for mutual respect.. or be forever doomed to failure and therefore always remain in the same lane, instead of coming out of the circular samsaric nature of existing in stagnation and dullness.. so forget about who let the dogs out, who turned the bloody lights out.

..though when it does works, it’s a beautiful sight to behold.. this mutual valuing of the other/s.

Once respect has been lost, it’s very hard to gain back.. and near impossible for some, that are so short-sighted that their vision prohibits such necessary formalities to materialise as true.

Yes. It takes a powerful will to favour strategy over the "right" to dissociate given by insult.

Well that rings a bell :lol: we have had one or two misgivings in the recent past, but sometimes that’s the way relationships are formed.

..social codes-of-conduct, as opposed to work ones.. they’re a thing.. why ever would anyone think they weren’t? How else would others be deemed worthy enough to follow a remit or be a part of it.
The possibility of anything we can imagine existing is endless and infinite

I haven't got the time to spend the time reading something that is telling me nothing, as I will never be able to get that time back, and I may need it for something at some point in time. Wait! What?

--MagsJ
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