Equanimity

This is the main board for discussing philosophy - formal, informal and in between.

Moderator: Only_Humean

Forum rules
Forum Philosophy

Equanimity

Postby phyllo » Wed Jan 24, 2018 6:15 pm

From another thread:
I believe the state of equanimity is a very generic prescription for the well being of an individual.

wiki wrote:
Equanimity (Latin: æquanimitas having an even mind; aequus even animus mind/soul) is a state of psychological stability and composure which is undisturbed by experience of or exposure to emotions, pain, or other phenomena that may cause others to lose the balance of their mind. The virtue and value of equanimity is extolled and advocated by a number of major religions and ancient philosophies.

I believe there is something wrong with the person and out of one's mind if they reject the idea of 'equanimity' and not wanting to cultivate such a state.

Note the opposite of equanimity;
agitation excitement distrust doubt fear frustration uncertainty alarm anxiety discomposure excitableness upset worry.

Are you implying you ignore equanimity and prefer the above tuburlences of the mind which you are acting out at present.

I believe any rational wiser person will spontaneously agree 'equanimity' is a prerequisite state that everyone should strive for.

viewtopic.php?f=5&t=186929&start=1225#p2691228

The first thing that came to my mind was 'The Logical Song' by Supertramp:
When I was young, it seemed that life was so wonderful
A miracle, oh it was beautiful, magical
And all the birds in the trees, well they'd be singing so happily
Oh joyfully, playfully watching me
But then they send me away to teach me how to be sensible
Logical, oh responsible, practical
And they showed me a world where I could be so dependable
Oh clinical, oh intellectual, cynical

There are times when all the world's asleep
The questions run too deep
For such a simple man
Won't you please, please tell me what we've learned
I know it sounds absurd
Please tell me who I am

I said, watch what you say or they'll be calling you a radical
Liberal, oh fanatical, criminal
Won't you sign up your name, we'd like to feel you're Acceptable
Respectable, oh presentable, a vegetable!
Oh, take it take it yeah

But at night, when all the world's asleep
The questions run so deep
For such a simple man
Won't you please tell me what we've learned
I know it sounds absurd
Please tell me who I am, who I am, who I am, who I am
'Cause I was feeling so logical
D-d-digital
One, two, three, five
Oh, oh, oh, oh
It's getting unbelievable


A rational person may want to 'surf' the ups and downs of life. He/she can see this as a more authentic life than one based on equanimity.

Equanimity involves a loss of extremes of emotion. In compensation one gets "stability and composure".

Is that a good trade?

Not every person will think so. Not everyone needs to strive for equanimity.
phyllo
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 10728
Joined: Thu Dec 16, 2010 1:41 am

Re: Equanimity

Postby Magnus Anderson » Wed Jan 24, 2018 6:25 pm

Making choices wouldn't make sense if everything was right and nothing was wrong. Would you agree with that? Imagine if someone came along and said "if you're discriminating between right and wrong then you're limiting your experience of reality". It's a surrender to chaos.
I got a philosophy degree, I'm not upset that I can't find work as a philosopher. It was my decision, and I knew that it wasn't a money making degree, so I get money elsewhere.
-- Mr. Reasonable
User avatar
Magnus Anderson
Philosopher
 
Posts: 3711
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2014 7:26 pm

Re: Equanimity

Postby WendyDarling » Wed Jan 24, 2018 6:29 pm

There are times to enact equanimity, for instance it would be very justified in times of dire crisis when having to deal with other affected individuals who may turn to you for calm guidance, but in general it seems like a flat line on a heart monitor. The way my brain functions, the way my memories are formed as episodic (heavily influenced by emotional content), the highs and lows of experiences allow me to thrive. What is interesting about many psychiatric medications is that they bring their recipients closer to equanimity than many participants prefer for they are giving up all the highs for a more methodical and lumbering emotional middle ground.

Good topic Phyllo.
I AM OFFICIALLY IN HELL!

I live my philosophy, it's personal to me and people who engage where I live establish an unspoken dynamic, a relationship of sorts, with me and my philosophy.

Cutting folks for sport is a reality for the poor in spirit. I myself only cut the poor in spirit on Tues., Thurs., and every other Sat.
User avatar
WendyDarling
Heroine
 
Posts: 7014
Joined: Sat Sep 11, 2010 8:52 am
Location: Hades

Re: Equanimity

Postby phyllo » Wed Jan 24, 2018 6:50 pm

Magnus Anderson wrote:Making choices wouldn't make sense if everything was right and nothing was wrong. Would you agree with that? Imagine if someone came along and said "if you're discriminating between right and wrong then you're limiting your experience of reality". It's a surrender to chaos.
Equanimity can be taken to the absurd level where there is complete indifference to any result. All choices then become "equal".

Proponents of equanimity don't go that far.
phyllo
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 10728
Joined: Thu Dec 16, 2010 1:41 am

Re: Equanimity

Postby Carleas » Wed Jan 24, 2018 7:11 pm

Interesting idea. It does seem that equanimity might only be a subjective preference. Though I personally aspire to equanimity, one counterargument could be that highs-and-lows tend to be more productive, as the positive flurry of the highs produces more than the dragging of the lows destroys. That is intuitively plausible; looking at artists and entrepreneurs, fame and productivity do seem associated with an uneven temperament.

I agree that equanimity is good for the individual, but for a healthy society, we probably need both the steady and the volatile.
User Control Panel > Board preference > Edit display options > Display signatures: No.
Carleas
Magister Ludi
 
Posts: 5619
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2005 8:10 pm
Location: Washington DC, USA

Re: Equanimity

Postby Magnus Anderson » Wed Jan 24, 2018 7:33 pm

phyllo wrote:Equanimity can be taken to the absurd level where there is complete indifference to any result. All choices then become "equal".


How so? Equanimity favors composure over discomposure. Apparently, not every choice is equal to every other choice.
I got a philosophy degree, I'm not upset that I can't find work as a philosopher. It was my decision, and I knew that it wasn't a money making degree, so I get money elsewhere.
-- Mr. Reasonable
User avatar
Magnus Anderson
Philosopher
 
Posts: 3711
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2014 7:26 pm

Re: Equanimity

Postby phyllo » Wed Jan 24, 2018 7:56 pm

How so? Equanimity favors composure over discomposure. Apparently, not every choice is equal to every other choice.
I suspect that we are not even talking about the same thing. :-?
phyllo
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 10728
Joined: Thu Dec 16, 2010 1:41 am

Re: Equanimity

Postby Magnus Anderson » Wed Jan 24, 2018 9:19 pm

Possible.

equanimity
calmness and composure, especially in a difficult situation

Equanimity can be interpreted to mean emotional dullness, in which case I agree it is a bad thing, but it can also simply mean composure, in which case I agree it is a good thing. In the first case, it means absence of emotions. In the second case, it means absence of neurosis.

I don't think that Buddhists preach emotional dullness. They preach emotional regulation. They want a healthy nervous system. If they appear to be emotionally dull it might simply be because they find it difficult to experience certain emotions and not because they don't want to experience these emotions.
I got a philosophy degree, I'm not upset that I can't find work as a philosopher. It was my decision, and I knew that it wasn't a money making degree, so I get money elsewhere.
-- Mr. Reasonable
User avatar
Magnus Anderson
Philosopher
 
Posts: 3711
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2014 7:26 pm

Re: Equanimity

Postby phyllo » Wed Jan 24, 2018 9:47 pm

Equanimity can be interpreted to mean emotional dullness, in which case I agree it is a bad thing, but it can also simply mean composure, in which case I agree it is a good thing. In the first case, it means absence of emotions. In the second case, it means absence of neurosis.
Equanimity (or composure) does not mean "absence of neurosis".
phyllo
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 10728
Joined: Thu Dec 16, 2010 1:41 am

Re: Equanimity

Postby Magnus Anderson » Wed Jan 24, 2018 10:02 pm

Sure thing.
I got a philosophy degree, I'm not upset that I can't find work as a philosopher. It was my decision, and I knew that it wasn't a money making degree, so I get money elsewhere.
-- Mr. Reasonable
User avatar
Magnus Anderson
Philosopher
 
Posts: 3711
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2014 7:26 pm

Re: Equanimity

Postby Pandora » Thu Jan 25, 2018 1:39 am

Extremes in emotion can lead to transformational breakthroughs. Such a person may end up reaching the same conscusion in the end, but not as a same person. It’s like reading a biography vs actually living through the events. Isn’t safety on of the main considerations of such person, or not wanting to lose his self?
User avatar
Pandora
Philosopher
 
Posts: 4153
Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2007 11:31 am
Location: Ward 6

Re: Equanimity

Postby Prismatic567 » Thu Jan 25, 2018 3:07 am

phyllo wrote:From another thread:

Prismatic wrote:I believe the state of equanimity is a very generic prescription for the well being of an individual.

wiki wrote:
Equanimity (Latin: æquanimitas having an even mind; aequus even animus mind/soul) is a state of psychological stability and composure which is undisturbed by experience of or exposure to emotions, pain, or other phenomena that may cause others to lose the balance of their mind. The virtue and value of equanimity is extolled and advocated by a number of major religions and ancient philosophies.

I believe there is something wrong with the person and out of one's mind if they reject the idea of 'equanimity' and not wanting to cultivate such a state.

Note the opposite of equanimity;
agitation excitement distrust doubt fear frustration uncertainty alarm anxiety discomposure excitableness upset worry.

Are you implying you ignore equanimity and prefer the above tuburlences of the mind which you are acting out at present.

I believe any rational wiser person will spontaneously agree 'equanimity' is a prerequisite state that everyone should strive for.


Phyllo wrote:A rational person may want to 'surf' the ups and downs of life. He/she can see this as a more authentic life than one based on equanimity.

Equanimity involves a loss of extremes of emotion. In compensation one gets "stability and composure".

Is that a good trade?

Not every person will think so. Not everyone needs to strive for equanimity.

Obviously you misunderstood the essence of 'equanimity'. Equanimity do not mean indifference to the range of life activities.

A person with a state of 'equanimity' would be in a better position to surf the 'highest ups' and 'lowest downs' of life plus the ability to face the worst extremes if they are unfortunately caught in them.

For example, a person with 'equanimity' may even volunteer to experience LSD or other powerful drugs that can induce the highest high, but what is critical here is the person with a high state of equanimity will not be carried away to seek the next fix and ends up being an addict.

When a person with equanimity is caught is any life threatening situation s/he will not instinctively panic and be reckless.

ALL humans are subjected to the risk of mental sufferings that trigger very strong emotions, and existential angst, e.g. terminal illness, loss of spouse [grief] etc. but a person with equanimity [anchored or strong stable keel] will be able to ride through these strong emotions rationally and wisely.

Note equanimity by default is complemented with wisdom [rational knowledge in action].
I am a progressive human being, a World Citizen, NOT-a-theist and not religious.
Prismatic567
Philosopher
 
Posts: 1907
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2014 4:35 am

Re: Equanimity

Postby Prismatic567 » Thu Jan 25, 2018 3:19 am

phyllo wrote:Equanimity (or composure) does not mean "absence of neurosis".
Equanimity (or composure) will enable one to psycho-analyze one's neurosis, seek the necessary treatment. self cure or do whatever is necessary to manage one's neurosis.

    Neurosis is a class of functional mental disorders involving chronic distress but neither delusions nor hallucinations. -wiki

    Neurosis = a relatively mild mental illness that is not caused by organic disease, involving symptoms of stress (depression, anxiety, obsessive behaviour, hypochondria) but not a radical loss of touch with reality. - google dictionary

Where a person suffer extreme mental illnesses that is beyond the person's rational mind to deal with, it is not likely the person would be able to develop or maintain a state of equanimity, thus irrelevant to the OP.
I am a progressive human being, a World Citizen, NOT-a-theist and not religious.
Prismatic567
Philosopher
 
Posts: 1907
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2014 4:35 am

Re: Equanimity

Postby pilgrim-seeker_tom » Thu Jan 25, 2018 3:40 am

Where a person suffer extreme mental illnesses that is beyond the person's rational mind to deal with, it is not likely the person would be able to develop or maintain a state of equanimity, thus irrelevant to the OP.


Huh?

More familiar imagery to illustrate somethang that can not be defined/described.

Gravity.jpg
Gravity.jpg (5.37 KiB) Viewed 2455 times


How long did it take mankind to figure out a way to pierce the planet's gravitational field.

There was very likely several instances of neurosis along the way ... equanimity would certainly not have achieved such a result.

Neurosis and other mental disorders do not operate in thought-tight compartments suggested by psychologists/psychiatrists.
"Do not be influenced by the importance of the writer, and whether his learning be great or small; but let the love of pure truth draw you to read. Do not inquire, “Who said this?” but pay attention to what is said”

Thomas Kempis 1380-1471
User avatar
pilgrim-seeker_tom
Philosopher
 
Posts: 1858
Joined: Sun Dec 17, 2006 11:16 am

Re: Equanimity

Postby Prismatic567 » Thu Jan 25, 2018 4:22 am

pilgrim-seeker_tom wrote:
Where a person suffer extreme mental illnesses that is beyond the person's rational mind to deal with, it is not likely the person would be able to develop or maintain a state of equanimity, thus irrelevant to the OP.


Huh?

More familiar imagery to illustrate somethang that can not be defined/described.

Gravity.jpg


How long did it take mankind to figure out a way to pierce the planet's gravitational field.

There was very likely several instances of neurosis along the way ... equanimity would certainly not have achieved such a result.

Neurosis and other mental disorders do not operate in thought-tight compartments suggested by psychologists/psychiatrists.
I stated one can have a neurosis [as defined above] and still cultivate and maintain a state of equanimity.

Where a person suffer EXTREME mental illness [e.g. extremely serious dementia, alzheimer's, loss sense of reality, loss of mental faculty] as defined, it can be easily observed the person is incapable to maintain a state of equanimity.
What is wrong with such a point?

I believed on hindsight of past mistakes, psychologists/psychiatrists do take extreme care to do their best in assessing mental patients in accordance to the DSM. But being human, mistakes will and did happen.
I am a progressive human being, a World Citizen, NOT-a-theist and not religious.
Prismatic567
Philosopher
 
Posts: 1907
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2014 4:35 am

Re: Equanimity

Postby phyllo » Thu Jan 25, 2018 4:38 am

Obviously you misunderstood the essence of 'equanimity'. Equanimity do not mean indifference to the range of life activities.
You said that it's the opposite of :
- excitement ... I don't think I want to get rid of that.
- distrust ... which can be a reasonable attitude.
- doubt ... again a reasonable attitude.
- fear ... often useful.
- uncertainty ... welcome to life. Seriously.

Let's concentrate on "excitement". A person is in love. If the person does not have equanimity, then he fully feels the excitement of being in love. If the person does have equanimity, then what? He feels no excitement? He feels only a little excitement? He feels contentment? He feels apathy?

The person without equanimity may write a great song or story about that love. What will the person with equanimity write about it?
For example, a person with 'equanimity' may even volunteer to experience LSD or other powerful drugs that can induce the highest high, but what is critical here is the person with a high state of equanimity will not be carried away to seek the next fix and ends up being an addict.
Now you're making it into some kind of magical state in which a person cannot become addicted to chemicals?
ALL humans are subjected to the risk of mental sufferings that trigger very strong emotions, and existential angst, e.g. terminal illness, loss of spouse [grief] etc. but a person with equanimity [anchored or strong stable keel] will be able to ride through these strong emotions rationally and wisely.

Maybe a person ought to grieve the loss of a loved one ... fully, emotionally, irrationally.
Note equanimity by default is complemented with wisdom [rational knowledge in action].
Why can't you be stupid and ignorant and still have equanimity? It is after all, a particular attitude towards events and therefore it does not seem to require any wisdom beyond adopting that attitude. (If that is in fact wisdom.)
phyllo
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 10728
Joined: Thu Dec 16, 2010 1:41 am

Re: Equanimity

Postby pilgrim-seeker_tom » Thu Jan 25, 2018 5:45 am

I believed on hindsight of past mistakes, psychologists/psychiatrists do take extreme care to do their best in assessing mental patients in accordance to the DSM. But being human, mistakes will and did happen.


A statement that exists comfortably within the bosom of equanimity. :-)

What about the individuals who believe they never make mistakes? Irrational people???

Perhaps these individuals 'see' what others refer to as mistakes as indispensable "teachers".

In my case ... most who know me believe either my first marriage was a mistake or my first divorce was a mistake. Ditto for my second marriage and so on.

Most people believe a serious case of epilepsy is both painful and undesirable. OTH ... Dostoevsky stated he preferred epilepsy over normalcy because he believed his epilepsy was the vehicle for his deeper insights concerning "being."

I like Jordan Peterson's statement ... "Life is a catastrophe ... accept it ... work with it ... not against it."

Pain is a teacher ... why the propensity to avoid pain?
"Do not be influenced by the importance of the writer, and whether his learning be great or small; but let the love of pure truth draw you to read. Do not inquire, “Who said this?” but pay attention to what is said”

Thomas Kempis 1380-1471
User avatar
pilgrim-seeker_tom
Philosopher
 
Posts: 1858
Joined: Sun Dec 17, 2006 11:16 am

Re: Equanimity

Postby phyllo » Thu Jan 25, 2018 6:20 am

Driven by a desire for control.
phyllo
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 10728
Joined: Thu Dec 16, 2010 1:41 am

Re: Equanimity

Postby Prismatic567 » Thu Jan 25, 2018 6:37 am

phyllo wrote:
Obviously you misunderstood the essence of 'equanimity'. Equanimity do not mean indifference to the range of life activities.
You said that it's the opposite of :
- excitement ... I don't think I want to get rid of that.
- distrust ... which can be a reasonable attitude.
- doubt ... again a reasonable attitude.
- fear ... often useful.
- uncertainty ... welcome to life. Seriously.

Let's concentrate on "excitement". A person is in love. If the person does not have equanimity, then he fully feels the excitement of being in love. If the person does have equanimity, then what? He feels no excitement? He feels only a little excitement? He feels contentment? He feels apathy?

The person without equanimity may write a great song or story about that love. What will the person with equanimity write about it?

I had a pause when I read 'excitement' in the list, but I realize there if a difference when one is excited like a monkey and not being able to modulate it.
A person who has equanimity will naturally and definitely feel excited over a new job, first time visiting a country or anything that is novel [positive] but such a person can modulate the natural excitement effectively.

When a person is in love, s/he could be with the partner who is or not reciprocating, or
fell in love with some one merely based on sight without the other being aware of it.

A person who is in love but does not have equanimity will be overwhelmed by his emotions and likely to do the silliest things to the extent the potential lover could even reject all his moves. To such a person love could be blind.
If such a person were to write a song, story or poem, it will not a presented smoothly due to the unmodulated excitability in the brain.

A person who is in love and have equanimity will definitely have his love circuit activated with the standard chemicals oozing and body triggered to react accordingly but s/he will not do all the above silly things. If such a person who were to write a song, story or poem it will be one that has high quality and reflect the appropriate intensity.

For example, a person with 'equanimity' may even volunteer to experience LSD or other powerful drugs that can induce the highest high, but what is critical here is the person with a high state of equanimity will not be carried away to seek the next fix and ends up being an addict.
Now you're making it into some kind of magical state in which a person cannot become addicted to chemicals?
Yes, a person with equanimity will not be addicted to drugs if s/he happened to try it. There is nothing magical about this.

ALL humans are subjected to the risk of mental sufferings that trigger very strong emotions, and existential angst, e.g. terminal illness, loss of spouse [grief] etc. but a person with equanimity [anchored or strong stable keel] will be able to ride through these strong emotions rationally and wisely.

Maybe a person ought to grieve the loss of a loved one ... fully, emotionally, irrationally.
All normal humans experienced grief naturally and where they do not have equanimity, they could fall into deep depression, various mental sufferings and all sort of other related problems.
A person with equanimity will definitely suffer grief naturally when triggered by death of a close one or others, but s/he will understand it is just a natural psychological reactions and let the effects wear off without amplifying its effects.

Note equanimity by default is complemented with wisdom [rational knowledge in action].
Why can't you be stupid and ignorant and still have equanimity? It is after all, a particular attitude towards events and therefore it does not seem to require any wisdom beyond adopting that attitude. (If that is in fact wisdom.)
I did not deny ignorance. Nothing wrong is I am ignorant of certain knowledge I am not interested in. As for stupidity it depend on degrees.
If one is stupid to the lowest degree, then one is stupid enough not be able to cultivate and develop a state of equanimity.
The fact that one has equanimity by default some degree of wisdom in one's ability to develop the state of equanimity and practice it.
Last edited by Prismatic567 on Thu Jan 25, 2018 6:43 am, edited 1 time in total.
I am a progressive human being, a World Citizen, NOT-a-theist and not religious.
Prismatic567
Philosopher
 
Posts: 1907
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2014 4:35 am

Re: Equanimity

Postby Prismatic567 » Thu Jan 25, 2018 6:41 am

pilgrim-seeker_tom wrote:
I believed on hindsight of past mistakes, psychologists/psychiatrists do take extreme care to do their best in assessing mental patients in accordance to the DSM. But being human, mistakes will and did happen.


A statement that exists comfortably within the bosom of equanimity. :-)

What about the individuals who believe they never make mistakes? Irrational people???

Perhaps these individuals 'see' what others refer to as mistakes as indispensable "teachers".

To topic re above, in general, qualified psychologists/psychiatrists will be drilled in their studies and practices, plus they will have the intelligence to understand no human can be infallible.
I am a progressive human being, a World Citizen, NOT-a-theist and not religious.
Prismatic567
Philosopher
 
Posts: 1907
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2014 4:35 am

Re: Equanimity

Postby Pandora » Thu Jan 25, 2018 7:52 am

In the military, they use a peculiar self assessment stress test. I’m not sure what model it’s based on (maybe Holmes and Rahe) but it reminded me of this topic. The test has a list of lifetime events most of which mark some type of defining change in ones life, like a death in the family or getting a new job. In the test, if an event applied to you you added points to your score. The thing is that the test does not discriminate between positive or negative events, so if, for example, you had a positive event, like marriage, birth of child, or a even just a promotion, you still add “stress” points to your overall stress score. The overall stress score does not discriminate where the points came from, only how high your overall number is, so the higher your overall number the higher your health risk. The presumption there appears to be that the less lifetime events (or changes) you’re experiencing, the better your overall health will be in the long run. Personally, I think this test is a little absurd by not differentiating the stimuli, but it doesn’t even address variables like the presence or absence of composure or self-control, it disregards it completely too.
User avatar
Pandora
Philosopher
 
Posts: 4153
Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2007 11:31 am
Location: Ward 6

Re: Equanimity

Postby Magnus Anderson » Thu Jan 25, 2018 8:13 am

I am bold enough to state that pretty much every mental illness can be cured using nothing other than meditation. Equanimity is the polar opposite of neurosis.
I got a philosophy degree, I'm not upset that I can't find work as a philosopher. It was my decision, and I knew that it wasn't a money making degree, so I get money elsewhere.
-- Mr. Reasonable
User avatar
Magnus Anderson
Philosopher
 
Posts: 3711
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2014 7:26 pm

Re: Equanimity

Postby pilgrim-seeker_tom » Thu Jan 25, 2018 8:19 am

phyllo wrote:Driven by a desire for control.


Sounds about right Phyllo ... the Adam/Eve/Serpent myth. :D
"Do not be influenced by the importance of the writer, and whether his learning be great or small; but let the love of pure truth draw you to read. Do not inquire, “Who said this?” but pay attention to what is said”

Thomas Kempis 1380-1471
User avatar
pilgrim-seeker_tom
Philosopher
 
Posts: 1858
Joined: Sun Dec 17, 2006 11:16 am

Re: Equanimity

Postby pilgrim-seeker_tom » Thu Jan 25, 2018 8:29 am

Magnus Anderson wrote:I am bold enough to state that pretty much every mental illness can be cured using nothing other than meditation. Equanimity is the polar opposite of neurosis.


I am bold enough to state that there is pretty much no such thing as mental illness. :D

I like your confidence in meditation ... for me, meditation is simply a process that facilitates the appropriate reconstruction ... usually not an exact replication ... of the brain's neural pathways and circuitry.

Nehru's prison life comes to mind.

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/ind ... 281702.cms
"Do not be influenced by the importance of the writer, and whether his learning be great or small; but let the love of pure truth draw you to read. Do not inquire, “Who said this?” but pay attention to what is said”

Thomas Kempis 1380-1471
User avatar
pilgrim-seeker_tom
Philosopher
 
Posts: 1858
Joined: Sun Dec 17, 2006 11:16 am

Re: Equanimity

Postby Magnus Anderson » Thu Jan 25, 2018 10:11 am

Pandora wrote:The presumption there appears to be that the less lifetime events (or changes) you’re experiencing, the better your overall health will be in the long run.


Emotions are stress. Apathy is sort of like fasting. Whereas fasting cleanses the body of toxins, apathy cleanses the mind (or nervous system.) And again, whereas fasting increases the appreciation for food, apathy increases the appreciation for emotions.
I got a philosophy degree, I'm not upset that I can't find work as a philosopher. It was my decision, and I knew that it wasn't a money making degree, so I get money elsewhere.
-- Mr. Reasonable
User avatar
Magnus Anderson
Philosopher
 
Posts: 3711
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2014 7:26 pm

Next

Return to Philosophy



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users