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Love my creation.

PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2011 7:15 am
by Sauwelios
Let me take you back, cause I'm going to---oh no, that's Lennon's story, not mine (and he soon changed "back" to "down"). My story begins in 1997, when I was in my last year of high school and had been a great Doors fan for a while already. I had long hair and a leather jacket. I wrote poems and songs in English. I read Blake and often used shrooms and the like (which back then were sold legally here). Now one day, I asked my German teacher about Nietzsche, as I'd read that Morrison greatly admired him. My teacher then told me and the rest of the class the beginnings of the "story" of Thus Spake Zarathustra (his coming down from his mountain etc.). But what was much more important, during my next German class, some days later, he gave me a copy of the book. (He often raffled off books in class, but this time, he just gave it to me.) My German back then was not very good, though, so when I had to make a reading list for my final mark, I read the book in English, and as it was mostly abracadabra to me, when I had to do a talk about the books I'd read I mostly just repeated to him what he himself had told in class... Somehow I still got a high mark.

Around the same time, I was in my first relationship, and I wrote a two-stanza song about it. Then my girlfriend broke up with me because I'd done shrooms in her presence, which scared her and which she had therefore forbidden; I graduated; and I got a full-time summer job. One evening I hurried home from work so as to still be in time to get some shrooms from the shop around the corner. My parents and siblings were all out of the country, so I had the house to myself. Now at one point in my trip, I tried to pick up where I'd left in the Hollingdale translation of TSZ, which I'd started to reread. I then saw that it was a collection of fake plastic jewelry and neonlights. I got the German version, and when I opened it and started to read, it was as if I'd entered a primeval forest. My native language is Dutch, and German and Dutch are very close, so it was as if I were reading very archaic Dutch. (I've heard the converse about native German speakers' experiences of Dutch.)

The last chapter I'd read in English was "Of Voluntary Death"; when I read the next chapter in German---"Of the Bestowing Virtue", the last speech of part 1---, I was inspired beyond belief. In a way I really only read the first part of the speech; from the second part, I really only picked up the essential message, "stay true to the earth, lead flown-away virtue back to the earth"; and from the third part, also only the essential message, which was that Zarathustra bade me goodbye... I then wrote a "bridge" to my two-stanza love song, knocked together a third stanza, which was a return to the first one, and---left the house.

It was a beautiful summer's eve, and I went to my city's central park, which is named after a poet and has a statue of him somewhere in the middle. The park was filled with people. I went straight toward the statue, over the flowerbeds, and climbed onto the pedestal. Then, with the poet's pedestal as my podium, I sang my song.

***

O Zoetsa,
I glance at the truth of your sight;
A glimpse of your eternal light.
The desert---I'm blinded.
Red sand---I am blinded.
O dark setting sun,
You'll be down so soon;
Look up at the sky,
Let us die now.

Mona Lisa,
You show me a mystery smile.
I know who you wish to beguile:
My heart---I am spellbound.
Our hands---we are well bound.
Oasis of Greece,
Let us rest in peace.
Oh no that's a lie,
Let us die now.

Ooooo Zoeeeeetsaaaaaaa!

I shatter your dreams.
I love my creation.
You hate me!
Ain't that what you wanted?
I want it!
And this is the truth:
I love my creation;
I want it!
Fuck all those who hate me.
They want it!
There's no one to save me.
I'm Jesus!
I'm Jesus!
I'm Jesus!


O Zoetsa,
I've glanced at your side of the truth;
One glimpse of your eternal youth.
So stunningly striking,
Thru thunder I'm light'ning---

O fiery sun,
You will dawn real soon;
You're dying to shine,
Yet let's lie
down
for now.

***

This is the final version of the song; the third stanza is much better now. In any case, what I'd written then did the job; I left the park, probably leaving some astonished people behind. On my way home, I laughed. I laughed in a way I'd never laughed before. Normally, laughter seems to be more or less inhibited by shame. My laugh then was completely uninhibited. I suspect it was the kind of laughter Zarathustra describes in his speech on "The Vision and the Enigma".

What happened that evening was that I "found my voice", as Tom Robbins puts it in his article "The Doors And What They Did To Me". One might say that I then attained my ideal, which I'd seen reflected in Jim Morrison, and thereby surpassed it. "O Zoetsa" is my "The End", though not nearly as epic, of course. I stopped being a Morrisonian and became a Nietzschean.

Sadly though, as winter approached, I fell into a depression, which lasted, with some ups and downs, for five years. In retrospect, I think it may not have been a depression so much as an anticyclone. The word "depression" also means a meteorological low, a low-pressure area. Now while it lasts, a high-pressure area behaves in much the same way as a low-pressure area, and another word for high-pressure area is "anticyclone". Nietzsche describes what I mean really well:

"We were brave enough, we spared neither ourselves nor others: but for a long time we did not know, whither with our bravery. We became dark, people called us fatalists. Our fatum---that was the fullness, the tension, the stowage of forces. We thirsted after lightning and deeds, we remained farthest from the happiness of the weaklings, from 'resignation'... A thunderstorm was in our air, the nature that we are was eclipsed---for we had no way. Formula of our happiness: a yes, a no, a straight line, a goal..." (Source: Nietzsche, The Antichrist, section 1, my translation.)

I broke out of my depression after I saw a depiction of Shiva dancing. This is a very different pose from his normal dancing poses. Anyway, that dance provided me an outlet for my rage (and in The Sopranos at least, depression is defined as internalised rage). Back then I called that dance style (which was also much inspired by "The End" at the Hollywood Bowl) "Shiva dancing"; in retrospect, I might also call it "cyclone dancing":

"The spear which I hurl at mine enemies! How grateful am I to mine enemies that I may at last hurl it!
Too great hath been the tension of my cloud: 'twixt laughters of lightnings will I cast hail-showers into the depths.
Violently will my breast then heave; violently will it blow its storm over the mountains: thus cometh its assuagement.
Verily, like a storm cometh my happiness, and my freedom! But mine enemies shall think that the evil one roareth over their heads.
Yea, ye also, my friends, will be alarmed by my wild wisdom; and perhaps ye will flee therefrom, along with mine enemies.
Ah, that I knew how to lure you back with shepherds' flutes! Ah, that my lioness wisdom would learn to roar softly! And much have we already learned with one another!" (Source: Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathustra, "The Child with the Mirror", Common trans.)

The flute, however, is Krishna's attribute, not Shiva's. While reading a book titled The Sword and the Flute recently, it struck me how much of a Dionysus figure Krishna really is. And a child figure, too. To use the symbolism of Savitri Devi's The Lightning and the Sun, the rage of Shiva is the thunderstorm that clears my sky from the clouds that make it gray; whereas Krishna is the object of my beatific vision. In fact, it's only the vision of Krishna that makes my Shiva shiva, "auspicious"; before that, he is Rudra, "the Roarer". Thus Rudra points to Krishna, the barbaric or Titanic Dionysus points to the Apollinian Dionysus. And when the former sees the latter, this apollinises the former, turning Rudra into Shiva. So in my view, Shiva and Krishna are both Apollinian Dionysuses: Shiva symbolises my Apollinian-Dionysian "I", whereas Krishna symbolises my Apollinian-Dionysian "You"; both however are symbols of the Self, symbols of wholeness.

P.S.: The last paragraph took me by far the longest to write, and is therefore probably the worst. The thing is that I was still thinking things through there, whereas in the rest of my message I was expressing things I'd already thought through. In the meantime, I've thought about it some more, and now associate Shiva with the "active subjects" mentioned in section 569 of The Will to Power (I know that number by heart, sigh), and Krishna with the "objects" mentioned there. According to the Hare Krishnas, Krishna is the only full god, whereas all the other Hindu gods are "demigods", with Shiva being the supreme demigod. I now connect this with Socrates' idea in the Symposium that Eros be not a god but a daemon. And as eros is (Plato's) Socrates' equivalent of the will to power, Shiva symbolises the highest will to power, philosophy. As Laurence Lampert says, philosophy is "the highest eros of a whole that can be understood as eros and nothing besides" (Lampert, How Philosophy Became Socratic, page 13). Krishna then symbolises how philosophy glorifies existence; he is then the objectified and deified Kama (Kama being the Hindu equivalent of Eros). These are still tentative thoughts, though. :}

P.P.S: Shiva symbolises beings---both individual ones and the sum of all beings, the whole---as seen from the inside; Krishna, the same as seen from the outside: cf. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/human_superhuman/message/425.

"From the dialogical perspective of the witness, [...] the squanderings of the genius ['the dancings of Shiva'] are often mistaken, especially by (relatively) impoverished souls, for invitations and seductions ['the flute-playings of Krishna']. From the monological perspective of the artist, however, these same emanations appear (if at all) simply as the inevitable by-products of the philosopher's private pursuit of self-perfection. Indeed, the ethical life of any community is made possible only by the amoral self-creation of the exemplary human beings who found---and then desert---it." (Source: Daniel Conway, "Love's labor's lost: the philosopher's Versucherkunst", The artist.)

Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2011 7:33 am
by The Golden Turd
Rejected







Okay- that was heartless..... but that's CO's function- divide and conquer before my coming. I'll have to give up this sham account now and reveal the real asshole you already know -who I am- in order to spend a little time being compassionate to someone who finally opened up and may be daring into a deeper philosophy than mere cultural pop readings.

Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2011 8:32 am
by The Golden Turd
YEAH... umm, I tried to log in with anew account- but never received anything in the email.... so that means I can't be nice here, I gotta be a ass until this gets fixed.

So- your trying to tell me your big life- the event that plunged you into a 5 year depression, was achieved via shrooms? And you broke out of it after seeing a Icon of Krishna-Shiva? That is a remarkably shallow depression going on there. Like- fuck... have you any idea what I was exposed to to plunge me into my depression? Do you have any clue how damnably hellish the climb was back out? I was completely isolated and abandoned, alone in the rain homeless. You saw a picture.

Fuck..... yes, there is a strong Dionysian element to Krishna. However, Krishna didn't get this attribute till later on, he's a northern God of the west coast, whereas Dionysius is a god of southern india- as the greeks knew him to be. He was introduced by indians who colonized the area called Antioch to Europe. The God Mercury/Hermes came from the same vicinity just to the south. Judiasm has a great influence from the Ugarite-Hurrian population there in the form of rituals and linguistics.... all three religions have a claim to this tradition- just the Judeo conception of it was much more advanced for the era of that time thanks to it's Abraham roots that rejected the Hermetic model from Mesopotamia. It went on to have great influence though on the Indians and the Egyptians, and Plato as well- and later on recombined into variants of jewish and christian mysticism- though the Christians and the Sufi population can lay claim to other independent systems that are pretty advanced, such as the ennegram.

This being said, there is also a blatantly strong Alexandrian element to Hinduism now in general. The religion's astrology is a direct importation of Alexander's astrology (ironically india uses it, whereas we use the older model in the west), ever since Chandragupta Alexandrian models have been pursued and formulated.

However, as someone who has spent considerable amount of time operating around ISKCON, no.... he's no longer the Dionysian you expect him to be- he does a lot in the Mahabharata...... but there isn't much Dionysian about the religion. You have to realize the religion almost completely died off under the influence of the Greek-top heavy Buddhist, and it took Vaishnavism and Shiavism along time to recuperate before launching a counter offensive. The indian states were always under attack by Muslims and reconstituted empires under odd cultures here and there that emphasized different aspects of 'hinduism'- which is like labeling Catholicism, Orthodoxy, Protestantism, Judiasm, and Islam and the Bahai faith as one lump religion.... I assure you, there was a difference of opinion at times in who lead.

Now- Krishna is a sexual heart throb and that is his esteem, but he's also monotheistic supporting a large priesthood and monastic complex and inter regional politics.


Read the Isapad Upanisad.... it's their main text.

Your cognitive structure is incorrect for Bhakti. The chanting is designed to bridge the Fe-Te separation of the right hemisphere on the INTJ faultline. The singing out load mixed with the beating that stimulates the modulated pace in the left hemisphere stimulates a large amount of brain lateralization- however, as your thalmus based, it's using pathways largely unconscious to you. You won't get the psychedelic rush as they would as your already conscious in both end points, but utilize a much more boring path. Nicheran Buddhism does this as well, as does most native chanting. You have to be open to the Basal Ganglia.

Dionysian religion stems from southern india, the hermetic tradition from mesopotamia, the Buddhist tradition was influenced by the greeks, the indians influenced poltinius who influenced later christian theologians. The Bhuddist and the Christians influenced the Manichean faith (according to the christian fathers from 50 AD, though there is a Madaean priest claiming they took from them, which is highly possibly) The chinese and muslims got the left overs. I've also been tracking evidence of a seemingly impossible flight of pagan arabs from arabia into Ethiopia across africa to Benin. I have scant sources on this, so am not in a place to say anything yet convincing even to me.

Nietzsche poundered the origins of the Dionysian cult began in a cave in asia minor in 'my sister and i'. Perhaps so, not a bad guess as to european eyes the dionysian religion and the stoic religion sprung there, the the Mithraic cult had strong ties to the cthonic earth.

Cynicism and to a extent Dionysian and Mythraic religious elements were incorporated purposely into Christianity. There isn't anything inherently mystery cult based about the religion outside the water baptism that has Zoroastrian roots in water and fire worship. But we took the trappings on cause that's what the people liked- doesn't really matter as christ didn't proscribe a form persay for the religion outside of communion and baptism and the poverty angle- the last we tended to forget. Hard to say which religion is more Dionysian. Greek Orthodoxy gets down and boogies harder in church festivals than the ratha varna festival does, and they ain't got shit in either case on roman catholic mardi gras.

Needs to be remembered that Krishna is NOT Dionysius in the beginning, and has a difficult time pulling it off sincerely today. However, Dwarka is correctly placed for the influenced to be felt, and your not incorrect for noticing elements. I myself would of noticed the orgy in the forest first over a fucking generic sphere.... but whatever.

Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2011 9:04 am
by The Golden Turd
http://murugan.org/research/valluvan3.htm

Ahmuvan is the most likely pre-vedic origination of the Dionysian myth. We can infer this from Smartism, as they are highly ritualistic and REFUSE to ever change their rituals under any circumstance, there is a split on accepting Skanda- and as you likely already know, Skanda is very closely related to Dionysius and Alexander.

The religion of Ahmuvan appears to be a sky religion that carried over from nomadism into the settled saraswati river valley civilization. It isn't wise to say it's the exclusive origin of the religion- especially considering on the otherside of the mountains the Zoroastrian religion arouse there on a blatant dichotomy to Hinduism. I am left to conclude the religion is likely a mountain religion- as Ahmuvan has some universal trinitarian features, whereas the iranians adopted a dualistic system not to dissimilar to monotheism. However, it's damn hard to know anything. It was a era where populations migrated and moved quite regularly, and brought and took away ideas.... and we still don't know what religion looked like prior to this era beyond speculations from gobekli tepe.

Get as confused or as lost as you wish in all of this. It's nothing impressive. Hinduism isn't the root of all religions, nor is Krishna. It's a development of a wide melting pot of humanity who stumbled all over. However, I won't hold it against a Vaishnav who claims it to be.... as that's the generic expected anwser. Judism isn't expected to be the original religion in the west- even if one accepted literally the creation story- we don't know what the religion was called, when it was first perceived as a religion, or what it's actual rituals were, or how it diverged and splintered and how it's orthodoxy counter balanced against whatever groups started floating around- or how Noah's lineage came about from all this. Only Hindus make the assumption they were the beginning of everything. It's much less decentralized in the west ironically. We all share Noah- the anti-dionysian- but his sons were equal and split up and went all over.

Of course, it should be pointed out various upanisads try their hands at a creation myth themselves. It's popular to ruminate on such things.

You take a remarkably late figure in antiquity and become fixated upon it. He's not to be found in the one you seek. He has claim in many religions. In Christianity we drink the wine of the Bacchus, and we take the poverty of the Cynic, and we theolgize in the religion of the Platonist and Plotinic thinkers, and have the forms of the Mythriac cults, and the robes of the pagan stoics, and the heirarchial and legalistic procedures of the roman religion, centered around on top of Jesus. It's a bloody world religion for a reason. It's synthetic in it's features, as is any large religion, but it has a real core in a great man. Dionysius was a fucking air god like the great sun sky god of the mongols in it's beginnings. Much less impressive.

Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2011 9:13 am
by The Golden Turd
And before you become anymore lost in the dionysian labyrinth, keep your cord attacked to the Pleiades and any myth listing birth and death related to them in indo-european lands. The battles and heros tend to pop up around this, as does Hermes and Dionysius. I am of course subjecting a later categorization to a older system in listing those two- but none the less... it's what I suspect THEY, the ancients were looking for. There is a reason Aquarius the water bearer is associated with the renewal but is also the inventor of the arts influenced by Dionysian and Apollonian religion..... largely filling/paralyzing the hermetic role- which shouldn't come as a shock given it's origins. I blame European Thebes for it all.

Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2011 9:53 am
by The Golden Turd
anyway: http://kataragama.org/research/krishnapillai.htm

that's my last link, the vel worship that so fascinates you. It all ties together in the south, not the north. Sorry. Gotta back herodotus on this one.

Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2011 5:46 pm
by Sauwelios
I wrote:While reading a book titled The Sword and the Flute recently, it struck me how much of a Dionysus figure Krishna really is. And a child figure, too. To use the symbolism of Savitri Devi's The Lightning and the Sun, the rage of Shiva is the thunderstorm that clears my sky from the clouds that make it gray; whereas Krishna is the object of my beatific vision. In fact, it's only the vision of Krishna that makes my Shiva shiva, "auspicious"; before that, he is Rudra, "the Roarer".

The transition from the second sentence of this passage to the last two is probably incomprehensible without this link: http://sauwelios.blogspot.com/2009/09/child-archetype-august-01-2007.html.

Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2011 6:22 pm
by Sauwelios
Impious wrote:So- your trying to tell me your big life- the event that plunged you into a 5 year depression, was achieved via shrooms?

The climactic experience from which I glided into it was catalysed by shrooms, yes. The essence of my depression, or anticyclone, was nihilism in the Nietzschean sense, i.e., goallessness.


And you broke out of it after seeing a Icon of Krishna-Shiva? That is a remarkably shallow depression going on there.

A drawing of Shiva, yes; but "after" is not the same as "by". What I wrote was this:

I broke out of my depression after I saw a depiction of Shiva dancing. This is a very different pose from his normal dancing poses. Anyway, that dance provided me an outlet for my rage (and in The Sopranos at least, depression is defined as internalised rage). Back then I called that dance style (which was also much inspired by "The End" at the Hollywood Bowl) "Shiva dancing"; in retrospect, I might also call it "cyclone dancing"[.]

Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2011 7:43 pm
by Pezerocles
And a Nietzschean lulls CO!

One more for the antichrist.

Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Fri Dec 16, 2011 8:00 am
by The Golden Turd
Nietzschean lulls? I don't understand this? Are you saying I am now a Nietzschean, or that I fell for some trap? I am a Christian- just happen to know alot about this topic. It's hardly a unknown tradition for christians to study other faiths, it's been done since day one. I've done considerable work in the history of dialectics, refuting the presumption dialectics started with Heraclitus- this came from extensive research into early religion and mythology. Doesn't mean I'm secretly a Nietzschean- just means I am in a excellent position to refute and challenge Nietzsche, as well as to give resources on topics. Dionysius is a important ancient God to track, given his relationship to Hermes/Aquarius, who is the most psychological of all the ancient gods and has a impressive history in and of himself, but also important as it is what most closely relates to INTJs in ancient typology- at least the portion of ancient religion of the pantheon of the gods that can be considered psychologically.

Still very much a christian, and your still very much the fool pezer. Keep working on your post Nietzsche, post Christianity values system- you got 5 1/2 months to figure it out.... tick tock goes the clock.

Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Fri Dec 16, 2011 4:32 pm
by Pezerocles
Impius wrote:Nietzschean lulls? I don't understand this? Are you saying I am now a Nietzschean, or that I fell for some trap? I am a Christian- just happen to know alot about this topic. It's hardly a unknown tradition for christians to study other faiths, it's been done since day one. I've done considerable work in the history of dialectics, refuting the presumption dialectics started with Heraclitus- this came from extensive research into early religion and mythology. Doesn't mean I'm secretly a Nietzschean- just means I am in a excellent position to refute and challenge Nietzsche, as well as to give resources on topics. Dionysius is a important ancient God to track, given his relationship to Hermes/Aquarius, who is the most psychological of all the ancient gods and has a impressive history in and of himself, but also important as it is what most closely relates to INTJs in ancient typology- at least the portion of ancient religion of the pantheon of the gods that can be considered psychologically.

Still very much a christian, and your still very much the fool pezer. Keep working on your post Nietzsche, post Christianity values system- you got 5 1/2 months to figure it out.... tick tock goes the clock.


The sound of your mask cracking is like the feeling of crunching crispy leafs with my shoe.

Mmmm...

Edit - Sorry CO, I let myself be goaded. You are right of course, to expect my post in the value system thread in about 5 1/2 months.

Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Fri Dec 16, 2011 5:55 pm
by The Golden Turd
There are masks nested under masks, reveal one and you expose a phantom. Look long enough into the forms of the stars, you may just make out the shape and nature of the mask we all collectively wear.

Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Fri Dec 16, 2011 5:56 pm
by The Golden Turd

Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Sat Dec 17, 2011 12:29 am
by morrisjessie33
I think the kingdom of Heaven is only Jesus.
In my creation nobody would have to come without my permission. Infact they have no opinion, if i would not create them. so, that's why i would love my creativity.

Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Sat Dec 17, 2011 3:08 am
by The Golden Turd
Why would you deny your submissives the right to cum? And what does this have to do with Iswallows bad trip that resulted in a 5 year depression?

Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2012 5:15 am
by Sauwelios
I should probably post this here.


Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 9:35 am
by Sauwelios
"Without commandments, obliging us to live after a certain fashion, our existence is that of the 'unemployed.' This is the terrible spiritual situation in which the best youth of the world finds itself to-day. By dint of feeling itself free, exempt from restrictions, it feels itself empty. An 'unemployed' existence is a worse negation of life than death itself. Because to live means to have something definite to do—a mission to fulfil—and in the measure in which we avoid setting our life to something, we make it empty. Before long there will be heard throughout the planet a formidable cry, rising like the howling of innumerable dogs to the stars, asking for someone or something to take command, to impose an occupation, a duty." (Ortega y Gasset, The Revolt of the Masses, "Who Rules the World?")

What if there is no such someone or something? Must one then not assume the duty of imposing duties on others? Or of inventing a heavenly Imposer of Duties? Is this not the duty imposed on us by the Nothing?...

Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 3:38 pm
by UrGod
Seems like we're both working on economics lately.

This 'duty' can indeed be imposed from outside, from one person upon another, but it can also be imposed upon oneself-- this is what more driven, intelligent and conscious people do with free time, they impose a duty of work upon themselves in order to keep creating values even though they lack "a job". But most people aren't like that, and without a job they will simply give in to entropy.

When the value-creating afforded by a healthy capitalist economy is sufficiently lacking for the average person, that is when self-valuing morphs into violent configurations meant to expel the void (Nothing as you called it) from oneself; namely, war.

Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 7:29 pm
by Sauwelios
I'm not working on economics. The word translated as "unemployed" is disponible, "available" (literally "disposable"). I posted that quote here because it quite perfectly describes my "anticyclone" (see the OP). The problem for me is not imposing a duty upon oneself, but imposing upon oneself a duty that is not arbitrary. I'm reminded:

"The complementary man 'is the first man who consciously creates values on the basis of the understanding of the will to power as the fundamental phenomenon.' Just what those values are Strauss is going to make clear—they are in no way arbitrary, they are not invented or created in order to celebrate mere inventiveness. Such creativity for its own sake counts for less than nothing in Nietzsche, less than nothing because mere creativity is the modern way, the way of the actor, the way Nietzsche most opposes: Nietzsche contra Wagner." (Lampert, Leo Strauss and Nietzsche, page 98.)

I'm not a "cappie" (a word I happened to learn earlier today); for me a healthy capitalist economy by no means suffices; I'm not at all impressed by classical liberalism. I rode on a tram (a kind of trolley) through the center of Amsterdam today; I didn't really see any meaning (philosophy or religion). I have my own way of "dropping the bomb" on all that, though.

Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Sat Feb 18, 2017 11:56 pm
by Venture
Your story is haunting.

Let me take you back, cause I'm going to---oh no, that's Lennon's story, not mine (and he soon changed "back" to "down"). My story begins in 1997, when I was in my last year of high school and had been a great Doors fan for a while already. I had long hair and a leather jacket. I wrote poems and songs in English. I read Blake and often used shrooms and the like (which back then were sold legally here). Now one day, I asked my German teacher about Nietzsche, as I'd read that Morrison greatly admired him. My teacher then told me and the rest of the class the beginnings of the "story" of Thus Spake Zarathustra (his coming down from his mountain etc.). But what was much more important, during my next German class, some days later, he gave me a copy of the book. (He often raffled off books in class, but this time, he just gave it to me.) My German back then was not very good, though, so when I had to make a reading list for my final mark, I read the book in English, and as it was mostly abracadabra to me, when I had to do a talk about the books I'd read I mostly just repeated to him what he himself had told in class... Somehow I still got a high mark.

Around the same time, I was in my first relationship, and I wrote a two-stanza song about it. Then my girlfriend broke up with me because I'd done shrooms in her presence, which scared her and which she had therefore forbidden


After this point our lives diverge, but I was using many more drugs. Sometimes I don't sleep for several days. Sometimes I will be completely still for nearly an hour, invigorated by thought. I have also had the same experiences with The Doors. I am still trapped in school, insitutionalized. Turd has some profound things to say and I appreciate this thread more than most I have seen on this site. Can anyone can refer me to anything similar on this site?

Re: Love my creation.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2017 11:03 pm
by MagsJ
To Sauwelious...

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